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  1. #76

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    With the recent "frakkn'" earthquakes in mind . . . perhaps a redux of "Shakey's Pizza" here in OK is overdue? (Shakey's--at least the one up by May and The Expressway--wuz good. It wasn't The Wedge or Element (MN) good. It was just really good. And the burgers at The (real) Split-T were too. Coit's? Good root beer. Not as good as A&W . . . Still, good

  2. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by RadicalModerate View Post
    With the recent "frakkn'" earthquakes in mind . . . perhaps a redux of "Shakey's Pizza" here in OK is overdue? (Shakey's--at least the one up by May and The Expressway--wuz good. It wasn't The Wedge or Element (MN) good. It was just really good. And the burgers at The (real) Split-T were too. Coit's? Good root beer. Not as good as A&W . . . Still, good
    Shakey's was a kid favorite of mine, and we frequented the location near my grandmother over on S. Western around 56th. Even though I was a little kid at the time, I have a fairly vivid memory of them putting me on one of the tables and dancing to one of their player pianos, and they gave me one of their hats, just all kinds of fun. I distinctly remember their pepperoni pizza having a wonderful and distinctive flavor that I've *never* again encountered. I was always fascinated by their blue-and-red-keyed player pianos, the hardwood tables, and the jugs/pitchers of soft drink they'd bring to your table. And I loved the colored "bottle-glass" door on the front - something I think the nasty remaining holdout from those surviving old Shakey's buildings actually retained (RoundUp in MWC on 29th).

    I remember Split-T being an event, although we didn't go there often. The hickory burgers were awesome. And we never made a trip near 50th and Portland without stopping for a rootbeer - and there was always something about Coit's root beer I liked better than A&W's. Can't tell you why, but I did, and I still miss treating myself to a Coit's chili cheese dog. Does their foodtruck serve those?

    Sadly, my very last memories of Split-T were a bit sad - it had been closed for a time, then someone reopened it around 1999 with, I think, grand aspirations of fixing it up, getting it back to some measure of its former self, but I think soon in they realized they'd bitten off more than they could chew. I worked in an office building near there at that time, and we'd go over there for lunch once in a great while, but it was deserted; it seemed two guys ran the whole thing, and parts of it clearly weren't even used anymore. Parts of it were in really poor repair. I was always surprised to see it was still open and operating when we'd go by - and then, finally, it was gone.

    Here's a curve ball for the ol' memory department....There was a really good BBQ place on SW 29th called "Han's BBQ", and I have fleeting memories of it being one of the first places I'd had (or at least remember having) a chopped BBQ sandwich...and it was really good. The sauce had a real zing to it; not really heavy or sweet, just really good.

    But for me, the granddaddy of all "missed places" for eating will be Glen's HikRy Inn on NW 12th. We used to go to Sunday "SMOR*GAS*BORD" after church, but once in a while we'd go there for a fancy family dinner night on a Friday. I still remember the rich aroma of hickory-cooked steaks permeating the dining area, just fostering your anticipation for the arrival of your own. Blueberry muffins were the appetizer, and you'd always look on the little service board near the pit for your waitress' number to light up. I always thought it was be THE impressive place to take a young lady on a date when I got to that age, but by the time that era of my life rolled around, Glen's was, sadly already gone. Wonderful place.

  3. #78

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerDave View Post
    Here's a curve ball for the ol' memory department....There was a really good BBQ place on SW 29th called "Han's BBQ", and I have fleeting memories of it being one of the first places I'd had (or at least remember having) a chopped BBQ sandwich...and it was really good. The sauce had a real zing to it; not really heavy or sweet, just really good.
    unless there was more than one han's, the only one i remember (in the mid to late 80's) was on nw 10th. i want to say they were on ne 23rd before moving there but that would've been way before my time.

  4. #79

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    unless there was more than one han's, the only one i remember (in the mid to late 80's) was on nw 10th. i want to say they were on ne 23rd before moving there but that would've been way before my time.
    I wasn't borned and raised here neither . . . yet I still remember how good the Han's BBQ on The 23 was (before it became a suburb of The Tower Theater District). =~) The one on the West Side was just as good . . . yet didn't celebrate diversity quite so much. =~)

  5. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    unless there was more than one han's, the only one i remember (in the mid to late 80's) was on nw 10th. i want to say they were on ne 23rd before moving there but that would've been way before my time.
    Martin,
    I only remember the one on 10th street and I'm 74 years old. That doesn't mean there wasn't other Han's but I don't know of any.
    C. T.

  6. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I was totally skewed by a mile, folks. You guys are absolutely right about where Hans was...just got my streets confused. Many apologies.

  7. #82

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    don't sweat it... i was just wondering if there was another han's that i'd never heard about.

  8. #83

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I just had an old place pop into my head: "Shipman's Cafe" I think the location we usually went to when visiting down here was on S. Robinson. They were famous for their chicken and their endless "biscuits" that were actually more like rolls. I was just a kid but I remember going there as a real treat. So maybe it WAS as good as I thought it was. Although the other, more modern location--on Reno?--that I visited perhaps a decade or two later wasn't quite the same.

  9. #84

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Seems like it has been mostly settled, but just to chime in, Han’s BBQ without question was located at NW 10th and Tulsa in a building which still exists, now home to a Mexican restaurant called Cocino Marin. Visited there many times with my dad as a kid. On one memorable visit we were seated next to Cecil Samara and his family. For a ten-ish year old OU fan in the seventies that was almost as cool as sitting next to Barry Switzer.

  10. #85

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?


  11. #86

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    ^ Thanks for that, Urbanized. It's hard to believe that a guy from Norway could create BBQ that was Nationally Recognized. I'll just say this one more time: There was definitely a Han's BBQ location, still operating, on the south side of NE 23, perhaps in the vicinity of Eastern, sometime in the early '60s. It might have been one of the "various locations" mentioned in the article and it was the one that introduced me to an appreciation of good BBQ, c/o my Oklahoma born and raised grandparents, that continues to this very day. I guess it was just that good. (the place wasn't far from Swick Auto Supply and some Motor Rewinding Shop. granddad was an old school auto mechanic. who appreciated good BBQ).

  12. #87

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Here's a defunct place to consider: The old-style A&W just west of and in the shadow of Persimmon Hill next to the old highway. It's distinctive architecture, including proper placement of a simple structure, nestled under some native trees, with room for a couple of picnic tables was delightful. The root beer was excellent. The choices of Papa, Mama, Teen and Baby Burgers was amazing. It was good. Gratitude always leads to Happiness. Or so it is said. Persimmon Hill was so nice that they built a Cowboy Hall of Fame on it.

  13. #88

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by RadicalModerate View Post
    ^ Thanks for that, Urbanized. It's hard to believe that a guy from Norway could create BBQ that was Nationally Recognized. I'll just say this one more time: There was definitely a Han's BBQ location, still operating, on the south side of NE 23, perhaps in the vicinity of Eastern, sometime in the early '60s. It might have been one of the "various locations" mentioned in the article and it was the one that introduced me to an appreciation of good BBQ, c/o my Oklahoma born and raised grandparents, that continues to this very day. I guess it was just that good. (the place wasn't far from Swick Auto Supply and some Motor Rewinding Shop. granddad was an old school auto mechanic. who appreciated good BBQ).
    Yes I won’t argue, as I read in several online stories about Hans that the 10th street location was not the first one. I just know from personal experience that in the 70s-80s and until closing in 1990 it was in that building at 10th and Tulsa.

  14. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I remember going to Punch and Janie's about 20 years ago, is that place still around. Seems like it was a converted house with some people still living in part of the building.

  15. #90

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by RadicalModerate View Post
    There was definitely a Han's BBQ location, still operating, on the south side of NE 23, perhaps in the vicinity of Eastern, sometime in the early '60s. It might have been one of the "various locations" mentioned in the article and it was the one that introduced me to an appreciation of good BBQ, c/o my Oklahoma born and raised grandparents, that continues to this very day.
    absolutely true... talked to my mom about this today and it was on the southside of ne 23rd just west of eastern... i'm gonna guess ne 23rd & hood because she said it was across the street from a restaurant owned by a greek named pappas. mom graduated from northeast in '61 and remembers selling ads in the school newspaper to hans... she says could always count on him buying an ad and thought it was due to the fact that her dad was off-the-boat swedish to hans being from norway.

  16. #91

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    ^^^^^^^^^
    Interesting...my maternal grandfather - before buying 80 acres at NW 150th and Santa Fe in the 30s - owned a home just north of 21st on Jordan, which is three blocks west of Hood. He had moved from Wisconsin and was half Swede and half Norwegian. Obviously that is now almost exclusively an African American neighborhood now, but these coincidences make me wonder if there was a Scandinavian community concentrated there at one point. Also makes my wonder if my grandfather knew Hans. It was my father (other side of my tree) who took me to the place on 10th for bbq.

  17. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I was a doubter about Han's, but I searched the DOK archives and found the following. They were in the 1700 block of N. E. 23rd. It surprises me, I'm one of the older folks here and have eaten at Han's since the 60's, but didn't know about the one on 23rd.
    C. T.

    p.s. I said "found the following", but I can't seem to upload it. Oh well, what I said was correct.

  18. #93

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I worked at Han's in the late 70's, the NW 10th & Tulsa location we the only one. The 23rd street location was prior to the 10th location. She was ready to turn it over to a family member but some thing happened which caused her to not pass it on.

  19. Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by bluedogok View Post
    I worked at Han's in the late 70's, the NW 10th & Tulsa location we the only one. The 23rd street location was prior to the 10th location. She was ready to turn it over to a family member but some thing happened which caused her to not pass it on.
    That really makes sense. I worked near N. E. 23rd (between 40th and 45th and Lincoln Blvd) for about eleven years and when we wanted Han's barbecue, we drove to N. W. 10th street. If it had been open on 23rd, we wouldn't have driven all the way to 10th and Tulsa.
    C. T.

  20. #95

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    charcoal oven?, shotgun sams, zieder zee?, the cafeteria that had the big fountain, johnnies hamburgers in el reno.....the family style chicken place. cant remember the name..i was a little kid in the 60's. the pizza wasnt as good as pizza from italy i have eaten as an adult. the fish at der dutchmen wasnt as good as fresh out of the pacific but we didnt know any better. any of the old cafeterias were better than eating at a fast food place today. in fact i dont remember eating at a mcdonalds in the 60's? there was a wendy's on 39th and meridian? there was a place on 39th that had 'curly fries'.

    i think these old unique places were/are better than the homogenous plastic places today.

  21. #96

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    I thought the original place at the top was the Chandel club. Vaguely remember going there once about '67 or '68, whenever it opened. Given my age at the time, (about 7 or 8) I remember nothing about the food . . . Only the rotating floor.

  22. #97

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Quote Originally Posted by Martin View Post
    i was curious myself and looked it up... according to a 1978 ad in the oklahoman, that shakey's was at 5733 s. western where autozone is now.
    Yes, that is it. . . They had torn down the old Shakeys many years ago. . .

  23. #98

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Your comment:

    "Shakey's was a kid favorite of mine, and we frequented the location near my grandmother over on S. Western around 56th. Even though I was a little kid at the time, I have a fairly vivid memory of them putting me on one of the tables and dancing to one of their player pianos, and they gave me one of their hats, just all kinds of fun. I distinctly remember their pepperoni pizza having a wonderful and distinctive flavor that I've *never* again encountered."

    Hit home. . That is exactly what I remember. I found a guy recently (2020) who lives near an open Shakey's. He says it has not changed, but I have my doubts. . . The original Shakey's had a very unique taste .

  24. #99

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    ^

    There are still Shakey's in California, but in all my time there I never went in. Were very different than what I remembered and focused heavily on buffets.

    There was one on NW 39th west of Meridian and we'd often go there after Putnam City football games; the piano player would play our fight song.

    They had those long tables and benches and the workers wore straw (really styrofoam) hats. They'd give kids the hats too; maybe for birthdays? Tons and tons of little league parties there.

    It was one of the very first pizza franchises along with Pizza Hut which started a bit later. And in Oklahoma, Shotgun Sam's was the other big place to go.

    Great memories.

  25. #100

    Default Re: Were the defunct places we miss really that great?

    Shotgun Sams

    Holloways Hamburgers on 23rd St.

    Split-T

    Hollies Drive-In

    A&W Root Beer 23rd and Meridian

    Casa Bonita

    I can't think of the name of the place just east of May Ave. on 10th, north side of the street.

    Nicolosi's Italian on W 10th.

    Delores Restaurant on 23rd east of Broadway.

    Kips Big Boy on May Ave.

    Other things;

    Didn't like it but the smell of packing town with a south wind

    Loved the sound of the stock car races at the fairgrounds

    Hearing Charlie 89er (l think that was his name) blow his bugle at the games then shoot his shotgun. Shooting his shotgun for every run scored.

    The old black guy who sold beer at the 89er games, "beah, getcha beah heah!" Him telling all the little kids, "you can't have no beer. We'll get you buttermilk!"

    Smelling the dirt laid fresh on the baseball field in high school the first days of spring practice.

    Smelling the burning brush from grassfires around during the spring.

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