Widgets Magazine
Page 66 of 67 FirstFirst ... 1661626364656667 LastLast
Results 1,626 to 1,650 of 1653

Thread: Oil prices

  1. #1626

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Continental has some plans in the STACK. I think they are pushing through with their plans, but the hold up may be investor's sentiment.

  2. Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by OkiePoke View Post
    Continental has some plans in the STACK. I think they are pushing through with their plans, but the hold up may be investor's sentiment.
    They will definitely be heavier in the SCOOP and Merge than the STACK. They are likely going to reduce their rig count as well but if their continued high dollar mineral purchases ahead of the drill bit in the SCOOP & Merge are any indication (they greatly reduced their STACK mineral purchasing activity last year), they will still be active in Oklahoma just probably a little less than they are now.

  3. #1628

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by PhiAlpha View Post
    They will definitely be heavier in the SCOOP and Merge than the STACK. They are likely going to reduce their rig count as well but if their continued high dollar mineral purchases ahead of the drill bit in the SCOOP & Merge are any indication (they greatly reduced their STACK mineral purchasing activity last year), they will still be active in Oklahoma just probably a little less than they are now.
    I'd say they have pretty long term plans in the SCOOP judging from the prices they are paying.

  4. #1629

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Significant drone attacks on main Saudi Arabian oil refineries. Oil prices have spiked. Houthi rebels in Yemen take credit but everyone knows Iran behind it. Houthi's don't have the means to do this alone. Look for respones from Arab nations against both groups.

  5. #1630

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    Significant drone attacks on main Saudi Arabian oil refineries. Oil prices have spiked. Houthi rebels in Yemen take credit but everyone knows Iran behind it. Houthi's don't have the means to do this alone. Look for respones from Arab nations against both groups.
    could certainly see a temporary bump in pricing. probably not anything crazy, and I doubt the bump lasts more than a few weeks. but we shall see.

  6. #1631

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Pre market opens at 530. Probably a 10% jump, if SA retaliates against Iran that’s when this spirals out of control quickly

  7. #1632

    Default Re: Oil prices

    The last five economic recessions were preceded by a spike in oil and gas prices. This type of conflict in the ME could be what kicks that off. I’m a believer that we will see much higher oil prices by spring/summer 2020.

  8. #1633

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
    The last five economic recessions were preceded by a spike in oil and gas prices. This type of conflict in the ME could be what kicks that off. Iím a believer that we will see much higher oil prices by spring/summer 2020.
    I am very concerned SA will launch a major retaliation againt Irans oil industry. I find it hard to believe Iran could think such an attack by Houthi rebels is believable and that Iran isn't behind it. I'm shocked the Iranians are that stupid.

  9. #1634

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    I am very concerned SA will launch a major retaliation againt Irans oil industry. I find it hard to believe Iran could think such an attack by Houthi rebels is believable and that Iran isn't behind it. I'm shocked the Iranians are that stupid.
    Oh I don’t think so. I think they’re testing MBS

  10. #1635

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
    The last five economic recessions were preceded by a spike in oil and gas prices. This type of conflict in the ME could be what kicks that off. Iím a believer that we will see much higher oil prices by spring/summer 2020.
    That was because we were dependent on foreign oil and price shocks would greatly impact consumer spending. We're no longer dependent on foreign oil, so while a price increase wouldn't be great for the consumer, it wouldn't have nearly the economic impact previous price spikes had.

  11. #1636

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    I am very concerned SA will launch a major retaliation againt Irans oil industry. I find it hard to believe Iran could think such an attack by Houthi rebels is believable and that Iran isn't behind it. I'm shocked the Iranians are that stupid.
    I donít buy it either. First of all, I havenít believed hardly a word from SA since they got away with 9/11 without any repercussions. They had us by the ba**s in 2001. That monarchy is as evil as can be.

  12. #1637

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by king183 View Post
    That was because we were dependent on foreign oil and price shocks would greatly impact consumer spending. We're no longer dependent on foreign oil, so while a price increase wouldn't be great for the consumer, it wouldn't have nearly the economic impact previous price spikes had.
    Also those spikes were like 90% not 15%

  13. #1638

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by Mr. Blue Sky View Post
    I donít buy it either. First of all, I havenít believed hardly a word from SA since they got away with 9/11 without any repercussions. They had us by the ba**s in 2001. That monarchy is as evil as can be.
    You said the opposite of me but you have to look beyond SA. I don't like them, how they treat women or much of anything about their Salafist religion but they are FAR better than the Iranian regime which is the cause of the vast majority of unrest in the Middle East today.

    Iran's Shiites and Sunnis are battling for control of Islam and the Persian Gulfs vast oil wealth. Iran has subtly aided but allowed the US to destroy ISIS and supporters but is quietly filling in the vaccuum and territory ISIS has left. They are trying now to establish a territorial control bridge from Iran to the Mediterranean to expand their influence and are doing this through well -trained and armed surrogate militias - with little direct action so they can deny responsibility. This is exactly why the Houthi's are taking responsibility for the oil refinery attack.

    The Houthi's barely have the ability to move beyond donkey carts and mud houses - nevermind coordinated multi-drone attacks specifically hitting the most expensive, explosive and vulnerable parts of a refinery. Obviously, this was an Iranian attack.

    By hitting these refineries, they are attacking the world's economies. The US could easily live without Middle-east oil but Asia and Europe can't. Like SA or not, they are an easy lesser-of-two-evils.

  14. Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    You said the opposite of me but you have to look beyond SA. I don't like them, how they treat women or much of anything about their Salafist religion but they are FAR better than the Iranian regime which is the cause of the vast majority of unrest in the Middle East today.

    Iran's Shiites and Sunnis are battling for control of Islam and the Persian Gulfs vast oil wealth. Iran has subtly aided but allowed the US to destroy ISIS and supporters but is quietly filling in the vaccuum and territory ISIS has left. They are trying now to establish a territorial control bridge from Iran to the Mediterranean to expand their influence and are doing this through well -trained and armed surrogate militias - with little direct action so they can deny responsibility. This is exactly why the Houthi's are taking responsibility for the oil refinery attack.

    The Houthi's barely have the ability to move beyond donkey carts and mud houses - nevermind coordinated multi-drone attacks specifically hitting the most expensive, explosive and vulnerable parts of a refinery. Obviously, this was an Iranian attack.

    By hitting these refineries, they are attacking the world's economies. The US could easily live without Middle-east oil but Asia and Europe can't. Like SA or not, they are an easy lesser-of-two-evils.
    None of that is worth the USA going to war over. Let Iran and SA hash it out.

  15. #1640

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
    The last five economic recessions were preceded by a spike in oil and gas prices. This type of conflict in the ME could be what kicks that off. I’m a believer that we will see much higher oil prices by spring/summer 2020.
    Hmm, recessions caused by high oil prices. or more of a case or world leaders foreseeing upcoming recessions and preemptively looking for anything to point their finger at? Purely speculative on my part and more of a though experiment.

    World is pretty tense right now. You have India and Pakistan on edge over Kashmir again. You also have the tense relations with US and China over Hong Kong and trade.

  16. #1641

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by jn1780 View Post
    Hmm, recessions caused by high oil prices. or more of a case or world leaders foreseeing upcoming recessions and preemptively looking for anything to point their finger at? Purely speculative on my part and more of a though experiment.

    World is pretty tense right now. You have India and Pakistan on edge over Kashmir again. You also have the tense relations with US and China over Hong Kong and trade.
    That could very well be the case, however it’s worth noting that in the past 50 years there has been a spike prior to the start of recession. With many predicting we will be in a recession this time next year I expect to see higher prices, understanding the global oil industry is different than it was during the last recession spike in 2008-09.

  17. #1642

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
    That could very well be the case, however it’s worth noting that in the past 50 years there has been a spike prior to the start of recession. With many predicting we will be in a recession this time next year I expect to see higher prices, understanding the global oil industry is different than it was during the last recession spike in 2008-09.
    Those “spikes” were 90% spikes and shale wasn’t a thing. We aren’t going to spike 90%.

  18. #1643

    Default Re: Oil prices

    We’re a long way from a recession induced by an oil spike. Like $40/barrel away.

    https://www.cnbc.com/2019/09/16/oil-...s-economy.html

  19. #1644

    Default Re: Oil prices

    i just wonder how many HZ locations are viable at current pricing in Oklahoma. just seems like a lot of these companies are into the idea of taking big barrels of cash and lighting them on fire.

  20. #1645

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Watching Jim Cramer on CNBC, he said US domestic is now the global " swing producer " .

    I thought , what ???

    Our domestic production can not be increased quickly. Increasing production involves drilling instead of tapping storage. And storage is bottlenecked in some places by lack of pipeline.

    Some times I wonder about Cramer. He says Rusty Braziel will be on his Mad Money show Monday. Cramer has sources but I still wonder what he's selling.

  21. #1646

    Default Re: Oil prices

    If you watch him much, his feeling is that demand growth in the US is declining with the proliferation of hybrid and electric cars as well as the desire among some groups to go carless or cut to one car.

    He is also huge on the Permian Basin and SE New Mexico production finally getting adequate pipelines to the gulf. That eliminated bottleneck is expected to be able to siphon off excess oil coming into Cushing- which is also getting some new pipeline capacity. Overall, his thinking is more efficient transportation from the well to the refinery and the US being able to be a huge net exporter now - especially in gas.

  22. #1647

    Default Re: Oil prices

    I watch CNBC in the mornings every day, have for a lot of years. I don't get that being his view.

    This event in Saudi shows why US domestic can not be a swing producer. No way US can get oil to the market that fast. Production growth is a long slow process. And cutting production to support a price level only comes when companies go bankrupt. They pretty much have the pedal to the metal all the time and don't show a lot of financial discipline. Many of the producers are so highly leveraged and have wells that deplete so fast, they can't quit drilling.

    No doubt increased domestic US production has created a glut of oil, but to call them swing producers globally is in accurate.

    Cramer keeps talking about " young money managers " who won't invest in oil stocks for climate change reasons. I don't think that has a whole lot to do with anything. Bill Gates said as much yesterday, said it accomplishes nothing. Sometimes these guys like Cramer only breathe the Wall Street air, they live in an echo chamber.

  23. #1648

    Default Re: Oil prices

    On Tuesday 7-11 raised regular gasoline prices from $2.159 to $2.199. Yesterday it was back down to $2.179. This was at 71st & N. Western.

  24. #1649

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by RedDollar View Post
    I watch CNBC in the mornings every day, have for a lot of years. I don't get that being his view.

    This event in Saudi shows why US domestic can not be a swing producer. No way US can get oil to the market that fast. Production growth is a long slow process. And cutting production to support a price level only comes when companies go bankrupt. They pretty much have the pedal to the metal all the time and don't show a lot of financial discipline. Many of the producers are so highly leveraged and have wells that deplete so fast, they can't quit drilling.

    No doubt increased domestic US production has created a glut of oil, but to call them swing producers globally is in accurate.

    Cramer keeps talking about " young money managers " who won't invest in oil stocks for climate change reasons. I don't think that has a whole lot to do with anything. Bill Gates said as much yesterday, said it accomplishes nothing. Sometimes these guys like Cramer only breathe the Wall Street air, they live in an echo chamber.
    Sorry, CNBC has been my constant background in my business for 20+ years.
    Cramer has said precisely what l said and has done so more than once. The young money managers issue is one of his points but he has long talked about the Permian fundamentally changing the country's energy situation once pipelines of sufficient volume can be built and opened. This has now been done. The efficient transportation of O&G is his main reason, not necessarily imcreased production. Once the next pipeline is complete, they can export the Gas from the Permian insteadvof flaring it off. There is also the issue that production could be increased pretty significantly if prices were higher. There are a lot of higher cost wells that are shut down.

    Cramer has talked about this frequently on his morning show so you couldn't possibly watch every day (no offense intended but he has talked in detail just in the last 2 weeks).

    He is often wrong but investing is like baseball you'll never hit them all and you work to correct your mistakes. One of his biggest disappointments, and he said so on air, was beleiving Aubrey McClendon and how he ran Chesapeake. He has also been very wrong about GE.

    As far as the wall street cocoon, you can't be a successful fund manager and not be attuned to what goes on around you. You definitely can get tied up in your own work and lose touch with everday knowledge for the rest of us. I used to work for a major fund company and spoke to a person once thought of as the greatest living stock fund manager. He was calling to ask how much he could put in his IRA for his annual contribution. Cramer doesn't seem to have this problem.

  25. #1650

    Default Re: Oil prices

    Quote Originally Posted by RedDollar View Post
    I watch CNBC in the mornings every day, have for a lot of years. I don't get that being his view.

    This event in Saudi shows why US domestic can not be a swing producer. No way US can get oil to the market that fast. Production growth is a long slow process. And cutting production to support a price level only comes when companies go bankrupt. They pretty much have the pedal to the metal all the time and don't show a lot of financial discipline. Many of the producers are so highly leveraged and have wells that deplete so fast, they can't quit drilling.

    No doubt increased domestic US production has created a glut of oil, but to call them swing producers globally is in accurate.

    Cramer keeps talking about " young money managers " who won't invest in oil stocks for climate change reasons. I don't think that has a whole lot to do with anything. Bill Gates said as much yesterday, said it accomplishes nothing. Sometimes these guys like Cramer only breathe the Wall Street air, they live in an echo chamber.
    Sorry, CNBC has been my constant background in my business for 20+ years.
    Cramer has said precisely what l said and has done so more than once. The young money managers issue is one of his points but he has long talked about the Permian fundamentally changing the country's energy situation once pipelines of sufficient volume can be built and opened. This has now been done. The efficient transportation of O&G is his main reason, not necessarily imcreased production. Once the next pipeline is complete, they can export the Gas from the Permian insteadvof flaring it off. There is also the issue that production could be increased pretty significantly if prices were higher. There are a lot of higher cost wells that are shut down.

    Cramer has talked about this frequently on his morning show so you couldn't possibly watch every day (no offense intended but he has talked in detail just in the last 2 weeks).

    He is often wrong but investing is like baseball you'll never hit them all and you work to correct your mistakes. One of his biggest disappointments, and he said so on air, was beleiving Aubrey McClendon and how he ran Chesapeake. He has also been very wrong about GE.

    As far as the wall street cocoon, you can't be a successful fund manager and not be attuned to what goes on around you. You definitely can get tied up in your own work and lose touch with everday knowledge for the rest of us. I used to work for a major fund company and spoke to a person once thought of as the greatest living stock fund manager. He was calling to ask how much he could put in his IRA for his annual contribution. Cramer doesn't seem to have this problem.

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. Oil prices low but why are gas prices still so high?
    By Jesseda in forum Current Events & Open Topic
    Replies: 28
    Last Post: 09-26-2011, 07:46 PM
  2. Replies: 8
    Last Post: 02-13-2011, 05:25 PM
  3. oil prices rising due to less resession fears
    By Jesseda in forum Current Events & Open Topic
    Replies: 4
    Last Post: 08-23-2009, 10:36 PM
  4. I'm glad our oil prices are up for this
    By kmf563 in forum General Civic Issues
    Replies: 11
    Last Post: 07-12-2008, 09:08 PM
  5. Replies: 6
    Last Post: 04-06-2005, 01:56 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO