Widgets Magazine
Results 1 to 25 of 25
  1. #1

    Default Norman Economic Development

    Here is really cool website with an interactive map outlining some cool projects and helping lure new development and businesses to the city.

    Welcome to Norman

  2. #2

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    There is also a survey you can take on the city's website for restaurants and retailers, such as what you'd like see, what you are interested... etc.

    https://www.surveymonkey.com/s/Cityo...staurantSurvey

  3. Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Edmond getting too boring for you? :-P

  4. #4

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Quote Originally Posted by venture View Post
    Edmond getting too boring for you? :-P
    Come on man... you can never have enough Churches, banks, single story, housing style, office complexes

  5. #5

  6. #6

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Locked article?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Maybe warreng would be kind enough to post?

  8. #8

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    I'll pm Warreng.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Here you go, sorry I am just now getting around to it:

    Boomtown: Norman could see $300M in developments

    By: Michael Clements March 29, 2016

    NORMAN – The city of Norman reported more than $90 million in economic development in 2015. Sara Kaplan, retail marketing coordinator for the city, said 2016 is shaping up to be even more active.

    Kaplan said that, based on projects that have applied for permits or have received permits, there are more than $300 million worth of developments in the works.

    “It’s hard to say how many will get finished. I’m going to guess it will probably be higher (than 2015),” Kaplan said.

    According to Destination Norman, 28 projects were completed in 2015 for a total of $93,583,348 invested. The website only lists projects that cost more than $500,000. The majority of the projects range from $500,000 to $5 million and are new retail construction, renovations and multifamily residential projects.

    The three largest projects from 2015 are the Aspen Heights Norman on Steamboat Way, an 83-unit student housing project worth $8.7 million; the $17.7 million Avenue Apartments on 12th Avenue SE; and the 196-unit, $23 million Millennium Apartments on E. Lindsey Street.

    The list doesn’t include OU projects because the college isn’t required to seek city permits for work on its campus. Still, Kaplan said improvements to the campus benefit the city. Just northeast of the college’s stadium expansion is a $53.5 million project. Construction is underway on the 430-unit University Apartments complex on Brooks Street. The project is expected to be complete by August 2017.

    Jason Smith, president and CEO of the Norman Economic Development Coalition, said Norman has always benefited from its proximity to Oklahoma City and OU’s presence. Smith said the low number of industrial developments isn’t necessarily a negative for Norman. While manufacturing is lagging around the state, Norman’s economy remains relatively strong.

    “There’s a lot of demand in all sectors of the city,” Smith said.

    Kaplan said the nature of the projects reflects the city’s demographics. Norman, the third-largest city in the state, boasts a high percentage of college-educated and high-skilled workers. As part of the Oklahoma City metro area, Norman is home to many people who work outside city limits. She said the university and the surrounding employers enable Norman to offer big-city amenities while keeping a community feel.

    “We’re not just a sleepy little college town,” Kaplan said. “We try to keep our unique identity.”

    Terry Floyd, development coordinator for the city, pointed out that even though its economy is not based on manufacturing, there are manufacturing projects. He said Evans Enterprises is building $2.7 million office and electric motor manufacturing facilities just off Interstate 35. The project will cover 86,890 square feet in three buildings.

    Smith added that Norman-based IMMY, which manufactures medical diagnostic equipment that can be used in under-developed countries, has begun an $8 million expansion. The company’s new facilities will be located off Corporate Center Drive in Norman’s new business park. Floyd said the company is an example of Norman’s strength.

    “They’re the first tenant (of the business park). It’s really great to have a local company as our first tenant,” Floyd said.

    The city is also investing in itself. Last October voters passed a one-half percent sales tax increase over the next 15 years with 72 percent of voters approving. The plan, called Norman Forward, will finance a wide range of public projects. The projects include expansion of the library system, improvements to the city’s swimming pools, expansion and improvements for city-owned sports facilities, public art projects and infrastructure improvements.

    Floyd said work has already begun, with design work on the library expansion underway. There has been a public meeting to discuss work on the East Branch Library. A public meeting to discuss work on the Central Library is scheduled for April 11 at 6 p.m. in the Norman City Council chambers, 201 W. Gray St. Kaplan said the projects will ensure further investment in Norman.

    “It’s all about quality of life. (Investors) want to see a high quality of life,” she said.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    This is a really cool website! Destination Norman

  11. #11

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Disappointing that Norman can't land more dense housing near Campus Corner and Main Street... All those new apartments are in general poor areas for walkability.

  12. #12

  13. #13

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Waaaay too much housing being built in Norman right now. It has to be stopped.

    http://www.news9.com/story/34217224/...e-construction

  14. #14

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Quote Originally Posted by Plutonic Panda View Post
    Waaaay too much housing being built in Norman right now. It has to be stopped.

    http://www.news9.com/story/34217224/...e-construction
    “There is a concern that it’s overwhelming the neighborhood,” said Norman planning director Susan Connors.
    Lol. What does that even mean? Ugh. Norman is constantly shooting itself in the foot.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Norman is in the beginning stages of becoming like New York City and that can't be tolerated.

    In all honesty though, I would really like to know as well. It would help if people would elaborate as to what they're getting at because I was OKC for the last 3 weeks and though I noticed an uptick, traffic was almost always moving and especially in this area around Campus Corner I noticed nothing about the area being "overwhelmed." In fact, I wouldn't mind seeing the area become much more dense than it is now.

  16. #16
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12,687
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    I bet Norman businesses in the area affected are most pissed off about no more new housing being built. No new housing, no new customers.

    “It’s completely destroyed the feet of the this area,” said OU professor Lloyd Bumm. Didn't he mean feel?

    Stillwater doesn't seem to mind the 5 story apartment complexes that have been going up within walking distance of OSU. One more complex around there means one less complex going up along N. Perkins Rd., which is already too congested from them. It was good how one residential area of single family homes in that area fought off a complex proposed to go up next to it.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    I believe what some of those complaining are concerned about is the fit for the neighborhood. There are some duplexes and multi-unit buildings going up that don't fit with the architecture or construction of the surrounding homes. They have large concrete parking lots in front of them where the neighboring homes have single car driveways. And the construction looks really cheap. To get an idea think of the new house on 16th in the Plaza (but with far cheaper construction) or those duplexes everyone hates in the Plaza.

    So I get what some of them are saying.

    On the other hand, a vocal contingent of Norman residents have been notorious in opposing virtually all new development, regardless of quality and fit. They want Norman to return to being a quaint college town. These people generally live right in the core of Norman. They're reflexively anti-development, and it gets pretty annoying because they offer no constructive ideas for the future of growth in Norman.

  18. #18

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Quote Originally Posted by king183 View Post
    I believe what some of those complaining are concerned about is the fit for the neighborhood. There are some duplexes and multi-unit buildings going up that don't fit with the architecture or construction of the surrounding homes. They have large concrete parking lots in front of them where the neighboring homes have single car driveways. And the construction looks really cheap. To get an idea think of the new house on 16th in the Plaza (but with far cheaper construction) or those duplexes everyone hates in the Plaza.

    So I get what some of them are saying.

    On the other hand, a vocal contingent of Norman residents have been notorious in opposing virtually all new development, regardless of quality and fit. They want Norman to return to being a quaint college town. These people generally live right in the core of Norman. They're reflexively anti-development, and it gets pretty annoying because they offer no constructive ideas for the future of growth in Norman.
    Excellent post and I agree with everything you said.

  19. #19
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12,687
    Blog Entries
    3

    Norman Re: Norman Economic Development

    Landlords: Blighted Boyd St. corridor properties in need of being replaced
    http://www.stwnewspress.com/oklahoma...45b5d9616.html

  20. #20

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    So apparently this actually went into effect and no new homes are going to be approved in the central part of the city until some study is completed. When it's completed then what? Streets widened to six lanes? Billion dollar transit system recommended? Sounds exactly like what's going on in Edmond. People just don't want the city to grow.

    http://m.newsok.com/article/5533916

  21. #21

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Quote Originally Posted by king183 View Post
    I believe what some of those complaining are concerned about is the fit for the neighborhood. There are some duplexes and multi-unit buildings going up that don't fit with the architecture or construction of the surrounding homes. They have large concrete parking lots in front of them where the neighboring homes have single car driveways. And the construction looks really cheap. To get an idea think of the new house on 16th in the Plaza (but with far cheaper construction) or those duplexes everyone hates in the Plaza.

    So I get what some of them are saying.

    On the other hand, a vocal contingent of Norman residents have been notorious in opposing virtually all new development, regardless of quality and fit. They want Norman to return to being a quaint college town. These people generally live right in the core of Norman. They're reflexively anti-development, and it gets pretty annoying because they offer no constructive ideas for the future of growth in Norman.
    I'm not quite sure that's what they're saying. They use words and phrases in the article like "growing too fast" and "overwhelming the area" etc... that seems to point out that they are just frustrated with Norman actually becoming a city.

    If the issue is that they think it should be more architecturally in synch with the surrounding neighborhood or built/designed better, than that's different, sure. But I didn't get that from the article though the news is often deceiving.

  22. Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    I'd love to see a photo comparison of Jenkins north of Boyd from the early 2000s to now. These new developments have greatly improved what was a street full of poorly maintained properties -- many of which were used as rentals anyway. I guarantee property values have increased exponentially and added density around one of the few walkable districts in the OKC metro has to be beneficial to Campus Corner businesses.

    "I want to live close to campus where 30,000 students are present daily."

    "I don't want students bothering me."

    /logic

  23. #23

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    I talked with a few people that live in the area on this and they indicated that historic homes were being demolished for cheap condos that didn't really fit with any houses around them. I think it's fair to have standards for the neighborhood, but I also think these neighborhoods near OU should also look to be more dense. So...

  24. #24

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Quote Originally Posted by dankrutka View Post
    I talked with a few people that live in the area on this and they indicated that historic homes were being demolished for cheap condos that didn't really fit with any houses around them. I think it's fair to have standards for the neighborhood, but I also think these neighborhoods near OU should also look to be more dense. So...
    From what I have seen these aren't cheap condos going in. What would bother me more if I were a resident are the crappy, old apartment complexes/duplexes scattered throughout that area.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Norman Economic Development

    Not sure if this was ever posted in the Norman section but I stumbled across this article outlying a recently passed transportation bond measure: https://www.normantranscript.com/new...d94c47018.html

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New economic development in Edmond
    By Plutonic Panda in forum Edmond
    Replies: 118
    Last Post: 12-04-2019, 08:55 AM
  2. Economic Development in Moore
    By Plutonic Panda in forum Moore
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 04-19-2019, 09:33 PM
  3. Norman Economic Development District.
    By ou48A in forum Norman
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 01-25-2013, 10:20 PM
  4. Replies: 13
    Last Post: 03-05-2012, 11:18 PM
  5. Norman Economic Development Coalition Business Practices
    By G.Walker in forum Suburban & Other OK Communities
    Replies: 2
    Last Post: 02-21-2012, 10:51 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO