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  1. #326

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Thomas Vu View Post
    I never saw an Aldi in OKC until I moved out of Norman (2011), but I know there were Aldi's in Tulsa before I moved out from Tulsa (2006)
    I'm not sure why anyone cares about who had Aldi first, but the first Aldi in the Tulsa area that I'm aware of is the one on Memorial in Bixby in front of the Starworld movie theater. They opened about the same time 20 years ago. But then Lawrence, KS had an Aldi when I went to college at KU in the late 80s, I used to shop there in college. I've never been to an Aldi in Tulsa.

  2. #327

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Swake View Post
    Quick Trip is a semi-national chain with 800 locations in 13 states with more than 20k employees and $10 billion a year in sales while being regarded as the best convince store brand in the nation along with Philly based WaWa. OneCue is not. They aren't comparable.
    you are right oncue's are nicer ..

  3. #328

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Swake View Post
    Quick Trip is a semi-national chain with 800 locations in 13 states with more than 20k employees and $10 billion a year in sales while being regarded as the best convince store brand in the nation along with Philly based WaWa. OneCue is not. They aren't comparable.
    And they aren't relevant to this conversation, which is why they are left off the list, along with 7/11 and restaurants.

  4. #329

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Swake View Post
    Quick Trip is .... OneCue is not. They aren't comparable.
    Not that it matters, but they are the same thing and, in pretty much every metric except maybe "semi-national" status, totally comparable. Personally, I'm indifferent to both. If I need gas, a quart of oil, wiper fluid, chapstick, a slushie and a hot dog on warming rollers and need it all immediately from the same place, my preference is gonna be the one that is closest to me at that time of crisis.

    I do have to say, though, that the inevitable mention of QT in every thread / discussion comparing some aspect of OKC and Tulsa is one of the most endearing things about Tulsans (and, also, the epitome of the daftness of the whole exercise). I've never felt that level of affection or loyalty towards a convenience store chain. I know it's headquartered there, like Love's is here, but I have to give it to QT for making their brand of convenience stores inseparable from their community's identity and, even, a point of civic pride. It's any brand managers dream.

  5. #330

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by BDP View Post
    Not that it matters, but they are the same thing and, in pretty much every metric except maybe "semi-national" status, totally comparable. Personally, I'm indifferent to both. If I need gas, a quart of oil, wiper fluid, chapstick, a slushie and a hot dog on warming rollers and need it all immediately from the same place, my preference is gonna be the one that is closest to me at that time of crisis.

    I do have to say, though, that the inevitable mention of QT in every thread / discussion comparing some aspect of OKC and Tulsa is one of the most endearing things about Tulsans (and, also, the epitome of the daftness of the whole exercise). I've never felt that level of affection or loyalty towards a convenience store chain. I know it's headquartered there, like Love's is here, but I have to give it to QT for making their brand of convenience stores inseparable from their community's identity and, even, a point of civic pride. It's any brand managers dream.
    This post made me grin pretty darn wide...

  6. #331

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by soonerfan_in_okc View Post
    Regarding the fresh market in Tulsa; I have no idea how it stays open. I just bought a home nearby so I visit it quite often, and half the time there are more employees than customers. It is really, really nice - the nicest in oklahoma imo - but prices out 85% of oklahoma shoppers.
    I agree it’s a great store! I’ve been to the one on Hilton Head Island, SC too. The one in Tulsa is near high income neighborhoods so they must help keep it open but also competes with the South Tulsa Whole Foods a mile away.

  7. #332

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by BDP View Post
    Not that it matters, but they are the same thing and, in pretty much every metric except maybe "semi-national" status, totally comparable. Personally, I'm indifferent to both. If I need gas, a quart of oil, wiper fluid, chapstick, a slushie and a hot dog on warming rollers and need it all immediately from the same place, my preference is gonna be the one that is closest to me at that time of crisis.

    I do have to say, though, that the inevitable mention of QT in every thread / discussion comparing some aspect of OKC and Tulsa is one of the most endearing things about Tulsans (and, also, the epitome of the daftness of the whole exercise). I've never felt that level of affection or loyalty towards a convenience store chain. I know it's headquartered there, like Love's is here, but I have to give it to QT for making their brand of convenience stores inseparable from their community's identity and, even, a point of civic pride. It's any brand managers dream.
    which also tells you all you need to know about tulsa ... their civic pride is based on a gas station chain and that they have hills .. (i guess they have never been to the east side of the okc metro)

  8. Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Teo9969 View Post
    This post made me grin pretty darn wide...
    Same! I think it's funny that Tulsans like talk about how much better QT is than Oncue, almost unprompted at times, when they are almost in every way the same.

  9. #334

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by PhiAlpha View Post
    Same! I think it's funny that Tulsans like talk about how much better QT is than Oncue, almost unprompted at times, when they are almost in every way the same.
    No, that's simply not true. By far most people in Tulsa have never even heard of Oncue and have no idea it even exists.

  10. #335

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    OnCue and QT are the same store except that OnCue has a cover from the gas pumps to the store. So therefore, OnCue > QT

  11. Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Lafferty Daniel View Post
    OnCue and QT are the same store except that OnCue has a cover from the gas pumps to the store. So therefore, OnCue > QT
    Not exactly. The two are very similar but QT places a high emphasis on fast checkout that few other convenience stores can match. They also make a ton of high quality cold sandwiches within the company that get distributed to most of their stores; OnCue sources theirs from a third-party supplier that just aren't as tasty, in my opinion. There's a few other minor differences too. Personally, I'm super glad we have OnCue in OKC - they've been nothing short of revolutionary for the local market in terms of convenience stores - but I understand why people would still have a preference for QT.

  12. #337

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail


  13. Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Swake View Post
    No, that's simply not true. By far most people in Tulsa have never even heard of Oncue and have no idea it even exists.
    Ok Swake. I guess you spend your time exclusively around people who never venture out of Tulsa to OKC or other parts of the state. My statement is 100% true about experiences with people I know and have met in Tulsa.

  14. #339

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by PhiAlpha View Post
    Ok Swake. I guess you spend your time exclusively around people who never venture out of Tulsa to OKC or other parts of the state. My statement is 100% true about experiences with people I know and have met in Tulsa.
    i go to the Tulsa area 2 or 3 times a week ... and your statement is 100% correct from my experience ..

  15. #340

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Other than the fact that most QT's I've seen don't offer 100% gas, the differences between the two to me are negligible.

  16. #341

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    OnCue vs QT sounds a lot like the Sam's vs Costco debate.

  17. Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    OnCue vs QT sounds a lot like the Sam's vs Costco debate.
    Yeah. QT fans build it up as better in nearly every way than OnCue but they are for all intents and purposes, the same store with a few minor differences. The biggest difference for awhile in favor of QT was the QT Kitchens that they started adding (the food is actually pretty good) but now OnCue is doing the same thing in some of their older stores and all of their new ones so that's mostly been cancelled out.

  18. #343

  19. #344

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    They've already pulled a building permit for Penn Square Mall.

    Maybe the Tulsa store will edge it out in terms of opening date?

  20. #345

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Both are scheduled to open in Fall of 2019 on Simon's website.

    Maybe they will brand both as "First to Oklahoma", open them at the exact same time so they are both first, and turn this whole Tulsa/OKC rivalry into an advantage. We fall for it and spend all our money on the first day.

  21. #346

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Jake View Post
    OnCue vs QT sounds a lot like the Sam's vs Costco debate.
    Or Apple vs the rest of the industry.

    QT seems to be on the cutting edge (if possible) in this particular niche. There may be a few other QTs out there, but not that I have seen in this part of the country.

    There are a few locals that do one thing as well as QT, but none that I can tell can put it all together in the way they do.

  22. #347

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    However, in Tulsa anyway, a disturbing new trend has been to have gun fights outside of QTs. I'm sure I've missed plenty of bad news over the last few months, but I swear every other breaking alert on my phone that involves a shooting happened at a QT. Maybe it's less that shooters are drawn to them so much as there are just QTs everywhere, so odds are that's where it would happen.

  23. #348

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    Maybe it's less that shooters are drawn to them so much as there are just QTs everywhere, so odds are that's where it would happen.
    Bingo, QT’s are all over Tulsa at almost every major intersection including higher crime areas on the north and east side.

  24. #349

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    Quote Originally Posted by Eric View Post
    However, in Tulsa anyway, a disturbing new trend has been to have gun fights outside of QTs. I'm sure I've missed plenty of bad news over the last few months, but I swear every other breaking alert on my phone that involves a shooting happened at a QT. Maybe it's less that shooters are drawn to them so much as there are just QTs everywhere, so odds are that's where it would happen.
    The Circle K by where I work has had a shooting twice during the past year.

    I'd say in OKC, it seems like Circle Ks are frequent targets.

  25. #350

    Default Re: OKC vs. Tulsa Retail

    From the Gazette:

    Retail Oklahoma
    The Oklahoma City metro is seeing an influx of new-to-market retailers.
    BY MIGUEL RIOS

    [img]http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/oakgazette.jpg]/img]

    Oak is one of several developments attracting new retailers to the metro area. - WAKEFIELD BEASLEY & ASSOCIATES / PROVIDED
    Wakefield Beasley & Associates / provided
    Oak is one of several developments attracting new retailers to the metro area.

    While traditional retail appears to be on a decline in some markets, Oklahoma is seeing various new retailers throughout the metro. About a dozen new-to-market stores have opened recently, and more are coming soon.

    Tammy Fate, senior manager of retail development and recruitment for Greater Oklahoma City Chamber, said the metro’s growing population, which is now about 1.3 million according to a 2010 U.S. Census estimate, helps draw retailers.

    “When you hit that 1.5 million in your population, you kind of become more on people’s radar, and we’re getting closer to that threshold,” Fate said. “People are also seeing the success that other retailers are having. All these retailers talk, and it’s becoming more about being part of a master plan development, not just coming out here and setting up shop by yourself. … Like Chisholm Creek had a 180-acre master plan development. There’s so many retailers, and they kind of play off of each other in that development.”

    Chisholm Creek is a mixed-use development offering dining, shopping and entertainment on Memorial Road and Western Avenue. In May, it announced the next phase of development, which would include five-story buildings with office space, more apartments, additional retail and a boutique hotel.

    On the other side of Western Avenue stands Oklahoma City’s first Costco Wholesale, which hosted a grand opening in early May at which store managers estimated nearly 8,000 people had already signed up for memberships.

    The Half is another development Fate said serves as an example of retailers playing off each other. The 52-acre development, which is named for being the halfway point between downtown OKC and Edmond, is the future home of two more new-to-market retailers opening in 2020: Texas-based Flix Brewhouse, a microbrewery and movie theater, and Chicken N Pickle, an indoor-outdoor entertainment complex with a restaurant, a sports bar and pickleball courts.

    Oak, a third development attracting retailers to the area, was announced in July. Formerly known as Penn Central, the new 20-acre development just south of Nichols Hills will have a 4-star hotel, 12 bars and restaurants and 250,000 square feet of retail and office space. Officials hope for a 2020 groundbreaking.

    When recruiting retailers, Fate said her role is to sell the market in general, so she doesn’t necessarily favor one development over another.

    “We’ve worked with some of the retailers that are looking at going into the Oak,” she said. “We showcase the entire market. I’ve done driving tours and met with several of the tenants that are looking at Oak, but at the end of the day, it comes down to the cost of the lease and terms and location and all those things. Our job is to make sure they are aware of the opportunities and possibilities within our market. At that point, as long as they locate to Oklahoma City, my goal was accomplished.”

    New to Oklahoma

    One of the most recent store openings was REI in the former Babies R Us space at Belle Isle Station. The Seattle-based outdoor retailer hosted a two-day grand opening celebration at its newest location, a 23,000 square-foot facility next to Nordstrom Rack. Fate said REI is one of her favorite stores and was elated to have a hand in finally bringing it to Oklahoma City. Before officially committing to open a location in OKC, she had been selling the market for years and it is a good example of the fact that they have to customize recruitment strategies from retailer to retailer.
    “Pushing that one over the edge was really trying to get them to understand that even though we don’t have mountains here or the type of topography that they typically like to locate in — like a Colorado or a Washington, where their headquarters are — there’s still a lot of active people here from hiking and biking and some climbing opportunities,” she said. “It takes years to really build that relationship. I’ve been doing retail development for about 15 years now total, and it’s always been on my target list. I’ve toured with them many times, and … really just continued to reach out and make sure that we stayed in the forefront of being on their agenda and their mind.”

    “There’s a lot of momentum and lot of positive growth that it makes it attractive.”
    —Tammy Fate

    Penn Square Mall also saw new-to-market retailers like Untuckit and Dry Goods, two clothing stores, open earlier this year. The Container Store also opened its first Oklahoma location just northwest of Penn Square Mall last September.

    “We worked on [The Container Store] for many years, and then they had to get approval through the neighborhood to even build there because it had to be rezoned,” Fate said. “Even though a retailer wants to be here, some of them have such specifics in terms of the demographics that they’re willing to locate in. I think that’s the thing that a lot of people don’t understand. They know who their customer is, and they know their disposable income, who the shopper is and what their target is.”

    At Classen Curve, national developer Washington Prime Group has brought several new retailers and restaurants to Oklahoma City since acquiring the shopping center. Trader Joe’s, Drybar, Sur la Table, Warby Parker and Bonobos are among the already-open, new-to-Oklahoma retailers in Classen Curve. The next one comes this weekend when western wear brand Tecovas hosts its grand opening.

    “You’re seeing ecommerce sites that are opening brick-and-mortar locations now. Warby Parker is an example of an ecommerce store that just opened at Classen Curve, and even Bonobos,” she said. “There’s a lot of these different stores that started out online. But then they realized they needed to have that brick-and-mortar presence and that Oklahoma City kind of fits that opportunity.”

    Other new-to-market retailers across the metro area include recently opened Duluth Trading Co., Cost Plus World Market in Norman and ShowBiz Cinemas in Edmond. Round 1, a big Japan-based entertainment complex, is set to open in Quail Springs Mall in 2020 or 2021.

    Retail outlook

    Through her role, Fate spends a lot of time at trade shows, pitching Oklahoma City. She said MAPS is one of the big things that sets OKC apart, along with some of the unique districts and the fact that the city is 620 square miles.
    “The future looks positive,” she said. “From our traditional economic development team, we have like over 90 projects in the pipeline, so showing a very healthy economy and showing that there’s companies that want to be here and move here. The traditional economic development team has had such a successful year. Last year alone, it was 7,355 new jobs that were added to the metro, and the capital investment was $495 million. That was either a project that was announced or opened in 2018.

    “When people see those companies locating here and seeing the housing market as well as the growth that’s happening and those kinds of things, it really helps kind of move the needle for retail as well. … It’s a fun city to promote. There’s so much happening here, and there’s a lot of momentum and lot of positive growth that it makes it attractive for people to consider our market.”

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