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  1. #1

    Default Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    We're ready to get rid of our 15yr old carpet and upgrade to hardwood floors. We're open to several options, from a DIY floating floor to having a pro come in and glue it down. House is 1999 on slab. Any advise or tips/tricks to making sure the job is done right the 1st time? We've looked at the big box stores and Home | Metro Flooring & Design | Moore, OK Has anybody used metro flooring? If so, what are your thoughts?

  2. #2

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    If you glue it down make absolutely sure you have no moisture coming up through the slab. In this house, I went with ceramic tile that looks like grey washed wood on my first floor, due to prior houses with moisture. I would do a nail down instead of glue down if I were you.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Our first set of hardwood floors came from Lowe's and the planks were beautiful; hickory, I believe. We installed them on our own (glue), and it was grueling, to say the least. The following year, a pipe burst in our foundation and flooded the entire house while we were on vacation. Hot water ran throughout the house for about four days and the floors buckled. So, the second set of hardwoods came from a local place here in Amarillo, and we paid to have them installed. Well worth it.

  4. Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    We've done laminate and hardwood - from now on its traditional tile and tile that looks like wood. So many upsides to the wood plank looking tile. Have you given it any consideration?

  5. #5

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    The wood look alike tiles are pretty cool and there are a lot of colors and styles available, but nothing feels like wood on your feet. I wouldn't do a glue down unless the veneer is thick enough to be sanded and refinished cheap glue down planks have a tendency for the finish to wear off relative quick within ten years or so. A good 1 1/4" nail down sand and finish is the way I would go. I like a company called lifetime floors very talented group and the styles and finishes are endless.

  6. #6

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by BBatesokc View Post
    We've done laminate and hardwood - from now on its traditional tile and tile that looks like wood. So many upsides to the wood plank looking tile. Have you given it any consideration?
    Haven't heard of it, can you provide a link to a sample?

  7. #7

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    I got my tile at Tile and Design on Western. I actually like the way the tile feels underfoot and it is amazing to just mop it and not worry about scratches.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    I had Kregger's in Edmond do about 800 SF in my house about a year ago. Really happy with the results using Anderson hand-scraped engineered hickory (they are literally hand-scraped by prisoners in South Carolina as part of a work release program). I think it ended up being around $8/SF installed (included carpet & tile removal and glue-down install over slab).

  9. #9
    Prunepicker Guest

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Servicetech571 View Post
    We're ready to get rid of our 15yr old carpet and upgrade to hardwood floors.
    We're open to several options, from a DIY floating floor to having a pro come
    in and glue it down. House is 1999 on slab. Any advise or tips/tricks to making
    sure the job is done right the 1st time? We've looked at the big box stores and
    Home | Metro Flooring & Design | Moore, OK Has anybody used metro
    flooring? If so, what are your thoughts?
    I used Sine's on N. Western. It was expensive but the results were
    spectacular. Almost everyone who walks in my home for the first time
    says, "Wow! Look at the floor."

    Oh, make sure they don't use transition pieces. Those are the hugh humps
    of wood that are supposed to transition between rooms. If you'll look at
    any wood floor from the 40's or 50's you won't find any "transition" piece.
    Everything flows from one room to the next. The transition from wood
    to marble should be the same level. No humps. Don't let them tell you it
    can't be done. It can and you should insist upon. Don't cave.

  10. #10
    Prunepicker Guest

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Servicetech571 View Post
    Haven't heard of it, can you provide a link to a sample?
    I don't care for laminate. Seeing the same patterns drive me nutz. Real wood
    is worth the $$$

  11. Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Prunepicker View Post
    I don't care for laminate. Seeing the same patterns drive me nutz. Real wood
    is worth the $$$
    Not talking about laminate - talking about wood look tile - extremely popular right now.

    However, good laminate does not repeat the same pattern over and over and each box contains several different 'grains.' We went ahead and put laminate in the home we just bought because we could do it ourselves and have it in, in a day and not have the mess and cost associated with real wood or wood look with tile.

    That said, we will most likely change over to wood look tile in a about 5-7 years after we build a guest house on our property. That way we can move in there while the floors are redone and the kitchen completely taken out and redone.

  12. Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Servicetech571 View Post
    Haven't heard of it, can you provide a link to a sample?
    Every tile specialty store or even Home Depot and Lowes carry it. Like wood and tile, it comes in hundreds of variations and quality level.

    I agree, it doesn't feel like a wood floor when you walk on it barefoot but you can make it heated (fairly costly) from underneath. What I like about it is that you never have to refinish it, great for homes with dogs, easy to clean and best of all, no water damage to worry about like with real wood or laminate.

    We did travertine in half the house (to break up the individual rooms) and then did very dark wood laminate in the rest of the house.

    Shop Wood Look Tile at Lowes.com!

    Tile-that-looks-like-wood-floor-305 : Flooring Ideas ? Nbaarchitects.com

  13. #13

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    I 2nd the wood look tile. Looks like a wood floor, and people are amazed when I tell them mine is tile. I got mine at Lowes. It's the Interceramic brand. Good thing about it the durability as in no scratching. You can just sweep and mop it. They do a really good job with the way they make it look like stain, wood grains, and even a few knots here and there. It's cheaper too.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Very interested in the wood looking tile. Price is about the same, with durability of tile.
    Other than the way it feels on bare feet is there any disadvantage? How does it affect resale value vs. real wood floors?

  15. Default Re: Hardwood Floors, exploring options

    Quote Originally Posted by Servicetech571 View Post
    Very interested in the wood looking tile. Price is about the same, with durability of tile.
    Other than the way it feels on bare feet is there any disadvantage? How does it affect resale value vs. real wood floors?
    Only disadvantages I can see are really on par with wood. Its a messy instal and you need to buy quality materials and have it installed by someone who knows what they are doing. However, after the instal is where the wood look tile really outsides real wood. Its very 'modern', extremely low maintenance, very durable, pet friendly, water friendly and very easy to clean.

    As for quality materials - just be careful with the lower end stuff because it needs to be uniform in shape and the longer the 'plank' the more likely it is to be uneven on either the sides or bottom. Most people instal without grout lines, so it is crucial the planks are uniform and that the installer keeps a very straight line.

    I was looking at new homes for ourself in 2012 and been looking again recently with a friend - the tile look wood is being used a lot in new construction and marketed as a upgraded amenity. So, I think it really helps with the value of a home. The only timer I think I might choose real wood over wood look tile is in the case of an historic home where the real wood just seems to be the natural choice.

    Had a relative recently go with all wood look tile in their new home because of the nightmare they experienced twice with a real wood floor in their previous home and water leaks. Each time the entire 1st floor had to be repaired, sanded and re-coated (no transitions, which meant all 2,600 feet each time).

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