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  1. #76

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Wal-mart will always be king here because OKC will always be a price-conscious city. The vast majority of people shop mainly for national brands (dole, kellogs, etc) on staples and Wal-Mart is virtually ALWAYS cheaper than everybody else on these items. Heck Target (which is more expensive than Wal-Mart) is around 50 cents cheaper PER CAN on Eden's beans than Sprouts. Why the heck would anybody go to Sprouts over Target for everyday items? Whole Foods is like 20% more expensive per tub of Stonyfield greek yogurt than Target. The EXACT SAME PRODUCT.

    Meats and prepared food. Yes, Whole Foods is so much better, but come on...

  2. #77

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Do you base that on anything? I hope you are right, but as OKCPulse confirmed, a new national player is unlikely to enter the market going up against a 60% Wal-Mart marketshare. The best case scenario is for Homeland to get bought or somebody local (Crest, Uptown Grocery, Reasor's) to do substantial expansion.
    Unfortunately no. I just have a feeling that OKC will see some better grocers come to town within the next few years.

  3. #78

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by td25er View Post
    Wal-mart will always be king here because OKC will always be a price-conscious city. The vast majority of people shop mainly for national brands (dole, kellogs, etc) on staples and Wal-Mart is virtually ALWAYS cheaper than everybody else on these items. Heck Target (which is more expensive than Wal-Mart) is around 50 cents cheaper PER CAN on Eden's beans than Sprouts. Why the heck would anybody go to Sprouts over Target for everyday items? Whole Foods is like 20% more expensive per tub of Stonyfield greek yogurt than Target. The EXACT SAME PRODUCT.

    Meats and prepared food. Yes, Whole Foods is so much better, but come on...
    I agree with you Wal-Mart will always be king in this market, but hopefully one day there are more higher quality alternatives. Many OKCitians will continue to shop at Wal-Mart no matter what because the lowest price is their top concern. There is nothing wrong with that. I am sure however there are enough people here who would support a higher quality option if it were available. Just take a look at Homeland. They are more expensive than Wal-Mart but in most of their stores provide an inferior product, yet they manage to survive. Now imagine if all Homeland stores were like the one at May and Britton. Then add a couple more Crest Fresh Markets on the Northside to that, and I think Wal-Mart's market share could be bumped down from 60% to around where it is in Tulsa - 45ish%.

  4. #79

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Those are 5 stores in a metro of 1.3 million people. Add in the select few nice Homelands and you still have less than 10 quality grocery stores in the entire metro. For comparison, Little Rock is a metro of 700,000 and they have 19 Krogers, one Whole Foods, and one Fresh Market.
    Yoohoo!!! Nail on the head!!

  5. #80

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Those are 5 stores in a metro of 1.3 million people. Add in the select few nice Homelands and you still have less than 10 quality grocery stores in the entire metro. For comparison, Little Rock is a metro of 700,000 and they have 19 Krogers, one Whole Foods, and one Fresh Market.
    Do you know -- are all those Krogers on par with the Crest Fresh Market stores, or on par with some of the lesser Homelands?

  6. #81

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by Plutonic Panda View Post
    I disagree. OKC's retail scene is really getting going and I think the grocer revolution is around the corner lol. . .

    I really think we'll see Krogers and perhaps Tom Thumb here soon.
    Tom Thumb is Safeway, they were still Dall based Tom Thumb stores when I lived in Dallas but shortly after I moved back to OKC they sold out to Randall's (Houston based) who sold out to Safeway. I really liked Tom Thumb's Simon-David store at Audelia & Skillman.

    I do believe someone will enter the market, it is too big for all of the national/regional chains to ignore even with Walmart.

  7. #82

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubya61 View Post
    Do you know -- are all those Krogers on par with the Crest Fresh Market stores, or on par with some of the lesser Homelands?
    Having lived in Little Rock, I would say the worst of them were on par with the Edmond Crest - one of the best stores in OKC. The best were on the level of Uptown Grocery or a Crest Fresh Market. Little Rock had another chain that folded - Harvest Foods - that were like most Homelands. Dirty, smelly, horrible selection, and looked straight out of 1980.

  8. Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Having lived in Little Rock, I would say the worst of them were on par with the Edmond Crest - one of the best stores in OKC. The best were on the level of Uptown Grocery or a Crest Fresh Market. Little Rock had another chain that folded - Harvest Foods - that were like most Homelands. Dirty, smelly, horrible selection, and looked straight out of 1980.
    Based on the latest demographics and what is being projected, OKC is about to take a serious turn in the retail and grocery market. It is worth noting that before the Wal-Mart invasion, OKC had a decent grocery store selection. I worked at Price Mart in 1997-99 (and another year at the same location after Price Mart was sold) and in those days, you could choose between Price Mart, Albertson's, Homeland, Akin's and the IGA chain.

    Then, Price Chopper came in and bought out all of the Price Mart locations, ran them in to the ground (I was still employed at the same location), and then sold the locations out to Homeland. When the sale to Homeland was announced, most of our best employees walked because they knew the cluster Homeland was about to institute. It's too bad the owner of Price Mart over-extended himself, because the food was quality, the selections were awesome and the employees were treated well. Very well.

    At that point, Wal-Mart had kicked off its market saturation strategy by using OKC as a test market because of the recent opportunities presented to them by the failures from Price Chopper and subsequently, Homeland. It was the perfect storm.

    As OKC's market continues to grow and as demand for non-Wal-Mart locations grows stronger, the days of lack of quality grocery stores are numbered for OKC. And Wal-Mart can feel it. Wal-Mart recently met a ton of opposition to put in a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market in northern Edmond from area residents. The application to rezone was denied. In the future, I foresee Wal-Mart shifting its focus to areas like Midwest City, Del City, Yukon and Bethany/Warr Acres while more quality stores will want Northwest OKC, Southwest OKC, North-Central OKC, Edmond, Norman and Moore.
    Continue the Renaissance!!!

  9. #84

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by okcpulse View Post
    Based on the latest demographics and what is being projected, OKC is about to take a serious turn in the retail and grocery market. It is worth noting that before the Wal-Mart invasion, OKC had a decent grocery store selection. I worked at Price Mart in 1997-99 (and another year at the same location after Price Mart was sold) and in those days, you could choose between Price Mart, Albertson's, Homeland, Akin's and the IGA chain.

    Then, Price Chopper came in and bought out all of the Price Mart locations, ran them in to the ground (I was still employed at the same location), and then sold the locations out to Homeland. When the sale to Homeland was announced, most of our best employees walked because they knew the cluster Homeland was about to institute. It's too bad the owner of Price Mart over-extended himself, because the food was quality, the selections were awesome and the employees were treated well. Very well.

    At that point, Wal-Mart had kicked off its market saturation strategy by using OKC as a test market because of the recent opportunities presented to them by the failures from Price Chopper and subsequently, Homeland. It was the perfect storm.

    As OKC's market continues to grow and as demand for non-Wal-Mart locations grows stronger, the days of lack of quality grocery stores are numbered for OKC. And Wal-Mart can feel it. Wal-Mart recently met a ton of opposition to put in a Wal-Mart Neighborhood Market in northern Edmond from area residents. The application to rezone was denied. In the future, I foresee Wal-Mart shifting its focus to areas like Midwest City, Del City, Yukon and Bethany/Warr Acres while more quality stores will want Northwest OKC, Southwest OKC, North-Central OKC, Edmond, Norman and Moore.
    I hope you are right about a change coming soon in this area. SW OKC and Norman are already starting to turn the corner in my opinion. They have the better Homelands as well as the Crest Fresh Market stores. Not sure about Norman, but SW OKC has less Neighborhood Markets than most areas of the metro so there may be a correlation there. As for Midwest City, Del City, SE OKC...many places on that side of town are food deserts. Even a Wal-Mart neighborhood market would be welcome, especially in the I-240/Sooner area.

    As far as the Edmond Wal-Mart, the NIMBYs also have been strongly opposing Reasor's from going in at Bryant and 15th. If Reasor's gets built, it will be one of, if not the nicest grocery store in the metro area. I think the opposition there is more due to Edmond residents not wanting the noise and traffic from additional grocery stores than it is any opposition to Wal-Mart. Reasor's in my opinion is the wildcard here. If the Edmond location does well, its very possible they could expand further into the metro area and become that quality option many are looking for. It would be great if they could buy up some of the worst Homeland locations as well as the abandoned ones and revamp them.

  10. #85

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    I hope you are right about a change coming soon in this area. SW OKC and Norman are already starting to turn the corner in my opinion. They have the better Homelands as well as the Crest Fresh Market stores. Not sure about Norman, but SW OKC has less Neighborhood Markets than most areas of the metro so there may be a correlation there. As for Midwest City, Del City, SE OKC...many places on that side of town are food deserts. Even a Wal-Mart neighborhood market would be welcome, especially in the I-240/Sooner area.

    As far as the Edmond Wal-Mart, the NIMBYs also have been strongly opposing Reasor's from going in at Bryant and 15th. If Reasor's gets built, it will be one of, if not the nicest grocery store in the metro area. I think the opposition there is more due to Edmond residents not wanting the noise and traffic from additional grocery stores than it is any opposition to Wal-Mart. Reasor's in my opinion is the wildcard here. If the Edmond location does well, its very possible they could expand further into the metro area and become that quality option many are looking for. It would be great if they could buy up some of the worst Homeland locations as well as the abandoned ones and revamp them.
    Ok, what is NIMBYS???? They sound like one of those awful groups that complain about anything and everything.

  11. #86

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by Plutonic Panda View Post
    Ok, what is NIMBYS???? They sound like one of those awful groups that complain about anything and everything.
    Sort of. NIMBY stands for "Not in my backyard." They are usually people who live near a proposed development who try to take action to stop that development from happening. Many times its simply people who don't want to deal with the traffic or noise that development would bring, as is the case for the Reasor's. It's also not uncommon for people in an upscale neighborhood to oppose a middle class neighborhood or an apartment complex going up nearby because of the demographic it would bring. Sometimes they can be environmental activists as well. Other times, they can be perfectly logical, such as the opposition to the Springhill Suites downtown.

  12. #87

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerDave View Post
    Just for my own curiosity, and for the edification of the broader discussion, could you put that contrast in concrete terms? "High quality" is very subjective. When you use that term, what do you mean, specifically? Store environment? Specific brand availability? Deli counter? Lack of a deli counter? Ample checkout staff? A pharmacy?

    The point is that it is easy to bash current selection under a fairly generic veil of "high quality," but as we all know, its very difficult to define quality except to the extent that we all seem to "know it when we see it." I'm really interested to know what you're thinking of when you use that term.



    And that begs a critical difference in the perception of what a grocery store is supposed to be. I go to a grocery store to (surprise, surprise) buy groceries. I don't go to "sit down and hang out or eat..."

    To me, a grocery store is a grocery store, not a coffee klatch. If it increases the operating costs of a "grocery store" by X% that I ultimately see in the prices of my day-to-day goods merely to sustain a place to "sit down and hang out or eat," then that store has very little chance of capturing very much of my business.

    That's not at all to suggest that I think providing such a place or wanting such a place is wrong, its just different. It doesn't mesh with my personal expectations. However, I don't think I'm walking a plank of drastic independence to suggest that most people I know view a grocery store in a substantially similar way. It tends to go back to that perception/practicality issue I mentioned in an earlier post.
    I think others have already answered this in my absence, but when I say high-quality it captures a lot of what you've described. In other words, it's not just one thing. It means an attractive store environment, including the interior and exterior, and it means a selection of interesting products and speciality items that you might not find everywhere. For instance, the Crest Market is nice, but when I've been there, it sometimes seems like they just have a lot of regular products rather than lots of speciality products. Also, a quality grocery store, as I define it, should have a bakery where everything isn't just pre-packaged. For instance, Crest, Walmart, and Homeland all carry some of the same pre-made cupcakes. I'd like to have a grocery store that actually makes their own cupcakes. And, yes, the deli should be good, and there should be a broad selection of pre-prepared foods that you can take home or eat at the store. Whole Foods offers these things, but it is really focused on organic products. This goes back your other question. If they have a dining area, live music, a coffee shop, a gelato counter, and a great gathering place, is it really a grocery store? Maybe not, but these kind of grocery stores (like Central Market in Dallas) can be found in lots of places outside of Oklahoma, and they are curiously absent here. Maybe Walmart is somewhat to blame (I'm not entirely convinced), but it is baffling to me that we have very few options like this in the entire metro area. I spend a lot of time in Northern VA, outside of Washington, DC. There you can find a lot of different grocery stores like Harris Teeter, Wegmans, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, Giant Food, and others. I guess it just depends on what you're used to. Like you, sometimes I just want groceries, but sometimes I want something more, and if I do, I basically have Whole Foods (and even our Whole Foods is smaller than others I have been to). Again, I wish we had some chains that whose slogans weren't "Low Prices," "Rock Bottom Prices," and "Buy 4 Less." That just tells you that they are focused on low cost, which is typically inversely correlated with an upscale offering.

  13. #88

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by gamecock View Post
    I think others have already answered this in my absence, but when I say high-quality it captures a lot of what you've described. In other words, it's not just one thing. It means an attractive store environment, including the interior and exterior, and it means a selection of interesting products and speciality items that you might not find everywhere. For instance, the Crest Market is nice, but when I've been there, it sometimes seems like they just have a lot of regular products rather than lots of speciality products. Also, a quality grocery store, as I define it, should have a bakery where everything isn't just pre-packaged. For instance, Crest, Walmart, and Homeland all carry some of the same pre-made cupcakes. I'd like to have a grocery store that actually makes their own cupcakes. And, yes, the deli should be good, and there should be a broad selection of pre-prepared foods that you can take home or eat at the store. Whole Foods offers these things, but it is really focused on organic products. This goes back your other question. If they have a dining area, live music, a coffee shop, a gelato counter, and a great gathering place, is it really a grocery store? Maybe not, but these kind of grocery stores (like Central Market in Dallas) can be found in lots of places outside of Oklahoma, and they are curiously absent here. Maybe Walmart is somewhat to blame (I'm not entirely convinced), but it is baffling to me that we have very few options like this in the entire metro area. I spend a lot of time in Northern VA, outside of Washington, DC. There you can find a lot of different grocery stores like Harris Teeter, Wegmans, Whole Foods, Trader Joe's, Giant Food, and others. I guess it just depends on what you're used to. Like you, sometimes I just want groceries, but sometimes I want something more, and if I do, I basically have Whole Foods (and even our Whole Foods is smaller than others I have been to). Again, I wish we had some chains that whose slogans weren't "Low Prices," "Rock Bottom Prices," and "Buy 4 Less." That just tells you that they are focused on low cost, which is typically inversely correlated with an upscale offering.
    Exactly. I do want to correct one thing - Tulsa does have these stores so I don't think its as much of an Oklahoma problem as it is an OKC problem. I don't think people who haven't spent much time other places realize what OKC is missing. I'll go as far as to say its not so much an 'upscale' offering that OKC needs but a mid-range one. I would consider H-E-B and Kroger decidedly mid-range.

  14. Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    I don't think people who haven't spent much time other places realize what OKC is missing. I'll go as far as to say its not so much an 'upscale' offering that OKC needs but a mid-range one.
    We had such stores, 30 years ago. For example, McCartney's, which was the original occupant of the NW Hiway and Rockwell location that's now Aldi's. McCartney's used almost the entire building, from the Ace Hardware on its east clear out to and including the PetCo area on its west. They featured a seafood department, a custom butcher shop that rivalled Kamp's in both quality and variety, and a wide range of products -- but were unable to survive as the area deographics changed.

    Others followed in that location, but both the size of the store and its range of products grew smaller with each failure. The current occupant has such a limited choice that I've never found reason to return after my first visit there. And all of these failures pre-date WalMart's entry into the grocery business in the area; the giant did take advantage of the problem, but we cannot blame them for its existence.

    I believe that the change in demographics due to the 1982 Penn Square Bank crisis, followed by failure or buy-out of almost all the existing financial institutions of OKC as the dominoes continued to fall, created the "low prices uber alles" mindset that has brought us to the current state of affairs -- and also that the current renaissance of OKC is being reflected in the rise of such stores as those cited by others in this thread. After all, when one hits rock bottom the only way out is up!

  15. #90

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    I am surprised that no grocery stores offer home delivery in Oklahoma City. I know Schwann's and a few others maybe out there but, I thinking more along the lines of traditional stores. I figured Homeland or Crest would have jumped on it a long time ago. All you need is a cargo van or one of the little mini commercial trucks with refrigerator unit on it. I figured people would be willing to pay $10-$25 for delivery depending on the distance from the store.

    If nothing else, I figure somebody would have started online orders and drive thru pickup. I think many people would pay for delivery or pickup if it meant they could avoid 30 minutes to an hour of gathering what they needed and standing in line at the checkout.

  16. Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by td25er View Post
    Wal-mart will always be king here because OKC will always be a price-conscious city. The vast majority of people shop mainly for national brands (dole, kellogs, etc) on staples and Wal-Mart is virtually ALWAYS cheaper than everybody else on these items. Heck Target (which is more expensive than Wal-Mart) is around 50 cents cheaper PER CAN on Eden's beans than Sprouts. Why the heck would anybody go to Sprouts over Target for everyday items? Whole Foods is like 20% more expensive per tub of Stonyfield greek yogurt than Target. The EXACT SAME PRODUCT.

    Meats and prepared food. Yes, Whole Foods is so much better, but come on...
    Wal-Mart is definitely not the cheapest by far. I compare prices and shop around. I live near a Wal-Mart but drive to But For :ell on 23rd & Penn. I save 30% over Wal-Mart. It is not the best store to look at but The prices, especially the sales can't be beat. I do shop at Wal-Mart sometimes for convenience and am amazed at how pricey their groceries are in general compared to others.

  17. #92

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by GaryOKC6 View Post
    Wal-Mart is definitely not the cheapest by far. I compare prices and shop around. I live near a Wal-Mart but drive to But For :ell on 23rd & Penn. I save 30% over Wal-Mart. It is not the best store to look at but The prices, especially the sales can't be beat. I do shop at Wal-Mart sometimes for convenience and am amazed at how pricey their groceries are in general compared to others.
    I agree. Personally I think Wal-Mart continues to dominate on the fact people perceive it to be cheaper on groceries. On top of that, people love the one stop shopping aspect of Wal-Mart. No need to go to a grocery store, hardware store, and variety store when you can get it all in one place. Familiarity also has quite a bit to do with it. My family, who are fully aware of the business practices of Wal-Mart, continue to insist on shopping there because they always have and it's what is familiar to them.

  18. Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by Jim Kyle View Post
    We had such stores, 30 years ago. For example, McCartney's, which was the original occupant of the NW Hiway and Rockwell location that's now Aldi's. McCartney's used almost the entire building, from the Ace Hardware on its east clear out to and including the PetCo area on its west. They featured a seafood department, a custom butcher shop that rivalled Kamp's in both quality and variety, and a wide range of products -- but were unable to survive as the area deographics changed.

    Others followed in that location, but both the size of the store and its range of products grew smaller with each failure. The current occupant has such a limited choice that I've never found reason to return after my first visit there. And all of these failures pre-date WalMart's entry into the grocery business in the area; the giant did take advantage of the problem, but we cannot blame them for its existence.

    I believe that the change in demographics due to the 1982 Penn Square Bank crisis, followed by failure or buy-out of almost all the existing financial institutions of OKC as the dominoes continued to fall, created the "low prices uber alles" mindset that has brought us to the current state of affairs -- and also that the current renaissance of OKC is being reflected in the rise of such stores as those cited by others in this thread. After all, when one hits rock bottom the only way out is up!
    And let's not forget Wehba's Grand Bazaar and I-240 and Walker, which vastly predated even McCartney's (and McCartney's eventually took over that space years later). They had drive-up, canopied grocery loading, they were among the first in OKC to use UPC price scanners and electronic cash register systems, had a full-service bakery and fish counter...you name it, they had it, and they were very successful for several years. I don't know why the bottom fell out of them (it eventually did, and the place was empty for a long time before McCartney's took it over, and then, years later, Pratts, which folded).

    And to roll the clock back just a bit further, keep in mind that Wal Mart was in essentially all of the surrounding states back in the 70's (albeit not exactly in their current form), but not in Oklahoma due to the presence of TG&Y. It wasn't until TG&Y took its ill-fated venture into "higher-end" shopping (anyone remember the awful "Aim for the Best" stores?) that led them to bankruptcy and opened the barn door wide and free to let WalMart in.

  19. #94

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Does anybody know if Buy For Less has any more Uptown Grocery locations planned or if the far north Edmond location is it?

    Crest is expanding their Fresh Market stores, if ever so slowly. Buy For Less could cover the Northside pretty well with a couple more locations. Gaillardia would be a great place to start.

  20. #95

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerDave View Post
    And let's not forget Wehba's Grand Bazaar and I-240 and Walker, which vastly predated even McCartney's (and McCartney's eventually took over that space years later). They had drive-up, canopied grocery loading, they were among the first in OKC to use UPC price scanners and electronic cash register systems, had a full-service bakery and fish counter...you name it, they had it, and they were very successful for several years. I don't know why the bottom fell out of them (it eventually did, and the place was empty for a long time before McCartney's took it over, and then, years later, Pratts, which folded).
    Those stores seemed to do real well until the oil bust hit, for the most part they were just ahead of their time in the OKC market.

    Quote Originally Posted by SoonerDave View Post
    And to roll the clock back just a bit further, keep in mind that Wal Mart was in essentially all of the surrounding states back in the 70's (albeit not exactly in their current form), but not in Oklahoma due to the presence of TG&Y. It wasn't until TG&Y took its ill-fated venture into "higher-end" shopping (anyone remember the awful "Aim for the Best" stores?) that led them to bankruptcy and opened the barn door wide and free to let WalMart in.
    That was after the local TG&Y ownership had sold to someone else and became nothing more than another cog in a large corporation who really didn't understand what they meant to this market. The same thing happened with Anthony's.

  21. #96

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Walmart is cheaper. Period. $300 buys you a nearly two cart full of groceries at Walmart, the same will buy you maaaybe one Cart at Homeland. I've people at Sprouts with half a cart and racked up $250 bill. There is nothing wrong with Walmart and these documentaries paint it in the worst picture. I agree they can be harmful to the local economy, but business is business. The strong survive and the weak perish. Some businesses will have to die so others can profit. That is the way or goes.

    Me personally, out of preference I shop at Sprouts and Uptown Grocery because I want to support "local" business. Walmart is not a bad company though, I'll give few examples. The one in Edmond had a lot of grime and crap accumulating on the outside wall facing Santa Fe, I wrote a letter to Corporate and literary within a week or two, they had someone with pressure washer, washing the exterior. When I lived in Dallas, they had one on Coit Rd. and G.B. Turnpike, I would buy fish from them occasionally and their selection was awful and their fish were dead half of the time, wrote a letter to corporate and in two months, they replaced all the tanks and have one of the best fish selections I've ever seem to this day(I was just there yesterday). Most recently, back in March I bought two computer monitors from them, had dual setup and one of them didn't work properly, they said they had discontinued that model and didn't have anymore and just because I wanted matching monitors, the manager took back the ones I bought and gave me a newer, better pair worth more than the old ones at no extra cost.

    So I believe Walmart does care about its customers and though they can have some bad effects on small local economies, it's up to the people to decide what they want at the end of the day. Portland is a Greta example, if I'm not mistaken, they banned Walmart from there. I could be wrong on that, but I believe I heard it somewhere on here. I love this site, but like it or not, the people on this site represent a small minority of OKC and the people that live in this city choose to shop at Walmart. That just the way it goes.

    Overall, I think there are about 5 super centers I would like to see replaced with an HEB(which I must add are nothing special) and that would be great. There are also places that could use a Walmart Super Center like the one being built Choctaw. That's just me though. I would've loved to had seen the original developement in Belle Isle, but it didn't happen and we need to move on I bigger and better things. Hopefully Belle Isle will get a face lift, as I stated I a previous thread.

    Either way, want to see stores like Kroger, Harris Teeter, Tom Thomb, Central Market come in and give more options to people here. I want this city to have better shopping options and just don't believe Walmart is keeping them out. I also think that one or more of those Grocers coming here is right around the corner.

  22. #97

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by Plutonic Panda View Post
    Walmart is cheaper. Period. $300 buys you a nearly two cart full of groceries at Walmart, the same will buy you maaaybe one Cart at Homeland. I've people at Sprouts with half a cart and racked up $250 bill. There is nothing wrong with Walmart and these documentaries paint it in the worst picture. I agree they can be harmful to the local economy, but business is business. The strong survive and the weak perish. Some businesses will have to die so others can profit. That is the way or goes.

    Me personally, out of preference I shop at Sprouts and Uptown Grocery because I want to support "local" business. Walmart is not a bad company though, I'll give few examples. The one in Edmond had a lot of grime and crap accumulating on the outside wall facing Santa Fe, I wrote a letter to Corporate and literary within a week or two, they had someone with pressure washer, washing the exterior. When I lived in Dallas, they had one on Coit Rd. and G.B. Turnpike, I would buy fish from them occasionally and their selection was awful and their fish were dead half of the time, wrote a letter to corporate and in two months, they replaced all the tanks and have one of the best fish selections I've ever seem to this day(I was just there yesterday). Most recently, back in March I bought two computer monitors from them, had dual setup and one of them didn't work properly, they said they had discontinued that model and didn't have anymore and just because I wanted matching monitors, the manager took back the ones I bought and gave me a newer, better pair worth more than the old ones at no extra cost.

    So I believe Walmart does care about its customers and though they can have some bad effects on small local economies, it's up to the people to decide what they want at the end of the day. Portland is a Greta example, if I'm not mistaken, they banned Walmart from there. I could be wrong on that, but I believe I heard it somewhere on here. I love this site, but like it or not, the people on this site represent a small minority of OKC and the people that live in this city choose to shop at Walmart. That just the way it goes.

    Overall, I think there are about 5 super centers I would like to see replaced with an HEB(which I must add are nothing special) and that would be great. There are also places that could use a Walmart Super Center like the one being built Choctaw. That's just me though. I would've loved to had seen the original developement in Belle Isle, but it didn't happen and we need to move on I bigger and better things. Hopefully Belle Isle will get a face lift, as I stated I a previous thread.

    Either way, want to see stores like Kroger, Harris Teeter, Tom Thomb, Central Market come in and give more options to people here. I want this city to have better shopping options and just don't believe Walmart is keeping them out. I also think that one or more of those Grocers coming here is right around the corner.
    Interesting that Wal-Mart actually took into account your suggestions. I wonder what would happen if I suggested they staff the Neighborhood Market near me with more than one cashier at 6PM. The Supercenters are too big and are a hassle for regular grocery shopping (for me at least) but I could handle the Neighborhood Markets if they were better staffed and better stocked. The Neighborhood Market in west Edmond at Western and 164th is usually embarrassingly bad every time I've been in it.

  23. #98

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Interesting that Wal-Mart actually took into account your suggestions. I wonder what would happen if I suggested they staff the Neighborhood Market near me with more than one cashier at 6PM. The Supercenters are too big and are a hassle for regular grocery shopping (for me at least) but I could handle the Neighborhood Markets if they were better staffed and better stocked. The Neighborhood Market in west Edmond at Western and 164th is usually embarrassingly bad every time I've been in it.
    I've never been to the one in west Edmond. I occasionally go to the one on 2nd and Bryant. Haven't been enough to determine how many cashiers their are. That might be a tough one, even if it was a Kroger it would be tough to get it through, but it's worth a shot. I was surprised to see them power wash the walls, but they did. Of course, it could always be a coincidence as they only wrote me back when I sent them the suggestion for fixing the fish center, never wrote me back after the grime issue.

  24. #99

    Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Walmart is great if you feeding an army. However, it's not that cheap if your feeding a family of four or less. I do most of my grocery shopping at Crest and only pickup a few things at Walmart on occasion.

    Walmart has also cut back on the variety of products. They have a few national brands and they are flooding the shelves with their private label goods. I think if their private label takes off you can pretty much guarantee they will go the Aldi route (only carry their brands). I also have issues with their breads. Most of the bread is stale when we get it. Crest on the other hand is almost always light and fluffy. The Reno Crest has the best bread stock in my opinion.

  25. Default Re: Quality grocery stores in OKC

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Interesting that Wal-Mart actually took into account your suggestions. I wonder what would happen if I suggested they staff the Neighborhood Market near me with more than one cashier at 6PM. The Supercenters are too big and are a hassle for regular grocery shopping (for me at least) but I could handle the Neighborhood Markets if they were better staffed and better stocked. The Neighborhood Market in west Edmond at Western and 164th is usually embarrassingly bad every time I've been in it.
    "Handling" the Neighborhood Markets tends to run contrary to fighting their impenetrable, dominating 60% market share, doesn't it?

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