Widgets Magazine
Page 2 of 4 FirstFirst 1234 LastLast
Results 26 to 50 of 76
  1. #26

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by G.Walker View Post
    I don't think Durant's growth is authentic, raw growth. I think most of this development is from the DFW Metroplex bleed over as Durant is now included in the DFW Metroplex combined statistical area.
    Where do you see Durant lumped in with DFW Metroplex combined statistical area? Does it also include Gainesville?

  2. #27

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by Dubya61 View Post
    Where do you see Durant lumped in with DFW Metroplex combined statistical area? Does it also include Gainesville?
    Dallas?Fort Worth metroplex - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia

    Durant, Ok is included as well as Gainesville, Tx

  3. #28

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    I believe a shopping center, a golf course, and a bigger waterpark are in the plans to be built adjacent to Choctaw Casino Resort as well. The Choctaw Nation has well overgrown their current office complex in Durant and have plans to eventually build a new headquarters. A Choctaw cultural center is also in the works.

    I'm surprised that Durant was never lumped with the Sherman-Denison metropolitan area, but yes, Durant (Bryan County) was added to the DFW CSA back in February or March of this year, the only Oklahoma county to be a part of the DFW CSA. There are, indeed, many DFW transplants living in Durant now.

  4. #29
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12,626
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by KayneMo View Post
    I'm surprised that Durant was never lumped with the Sherman-Denison metropolitan area, but yes, Durant (Bryan County) was added to the DFW CSA back in February or March of this year, the only Oklahoma county to be a part of the DFW CSA. There are, indeed, many DFW transplants living in Durant now.
    You mean retired people? Because the drive to work to Dallas is an hour and a half. Who wants to be on the highway for 3 hours a day?

  5. #30

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by Bunty View Post
    You mean retired people? Because the drive to work to Dallas is an hour and a half. Who wants to be on the highway for 3 hours a day?
    I meant people who have relocated from DFW to Durant. But I do know a few people who commute from Durant to DFW, and vice-versa.

  6. #31

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    The Hampton Inn has open up in Ada, we are also getting an Aldi store, some exciting things going on in Ada.

  7. #32

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by theparkman81 View Post
    The Hampton Inn has open up in Ada, we are also getting an Aldi store, some exciting things going on in Ada.
    The Chickasaw Nation is apparently a very big player down there. They employ a lot of people and they've poured a lot of money into that economy. They even have their own police force. Still not sure how that works with the Ada PD. Anyone know?

  8. #33

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by Bunty View Post
    You mean retired people? Because the drive to work to Dallas is an hour and a half. Who wants to be on the highway for 3 hours a day?
    You talk to builders in North Texas and they'll tell you that highway 75 all the way from downtown Dallas to Durant will one day be one big huge development. Through Plano, East Frisco, Allen, McKinney on up to Sherman-Denison and Durant.
    And they're dead serious. Try buying land on Highway 75 to Durant. If you find it, expect to shell out enormous sums of money.

  9. #34
    Join Date
    May 2008
    Posts
    12,626
    Blog Entries
    3

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by zookeeper View Post
    You talk to builders in North Texas and they'll tell you that highway 75 all the way from downtown Dallas to Durant will one day be one big huge development. Through Plano, East Frisco, Allen, McKinney on up to Sherman-Denison and Durant.
    And they're dead serious. Try buying land on Highway 75 to Durant. If you find it, expect to shell out enormous sums of money.
    I've lived no further than 10 or 15 minutes from work all my life, so I'll never be able to relate to these folks who think they're getting a pretty damned good deal in life from a drive to work every day, which takes over an hour to get there.

  10. #35

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Rural areas for the most part don't seem to be faring too well in this day and age. I know western Kansas has towns that are slowly but surely dying and becoming ghost towns as the older population dies off and the younger generation moves to larger cities. It's the same story almost everywhere you go. My guess is in Oklahoma, the most thriving rural areas are either small towns within the economic market over a major city, such as Shawnee or Guthrie, or towns that have some sort of major college or military presence pumping up their economy. Places like Enid, Lawton, and Stillwater come to mind.

  11. #36

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by bchris02 View Post
    Rural areas for the most part don't seem to be faring too well in this day and age. I know western Kansas has towns that are slowly but surely dying and becoming ghost towns as the older population dies off and the younger generation moves to larger cities. It's the same story almost everywhere you go. My guess is in Oklahoma, the most thriving rural areas are either small towns within the economic market over a major city, such as Shawnee or Guthrie, or towns that have some sort of major college or military presence pumping up their economy. Places like Enid, Lawton, and Stillwater come to mind.
    Ardmore is booming. I-35 halfway between OKC and Dallas. That city has changed so much over the last 15 years.

  12. #37

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Since the last update I posted, La Quinta, IHOP, Discount Tire, CVS, two car dealerships, a tile manufacturing and distribution center, an asphalt blending plant, a metal fabrication and welding business, and a Choctaw Nation food distribution center have opened. Another car dealership is about to break ground and three shopping centers, an apartment complex, a huge church, and a heart medical center are under construction. A new one million gallon water tower will soon be erected in northern Durant. Our local McDonald's was demolished and completely rebuilt, and the Pizza Hut was renovated. Blockbuster has closed but a Movie House and AT&T have taken it's place in the building. There are rumors that a Starbucks, Dunkin' Donuts, Golden Corral (all part of a new development called Durant Town Center), and an Aldi are in the works. The western half of the Highway 70 bypass has opened as well, and State Highway 78 is currently being expanded to four lanes in northern Durant. A cultural center for the Choctaw Nation is closer to fruition, and a stickball field was recently built! Also, the expansion to the casino resort is underway including a 22-story hotel, a bowling alley, a movie theater, and more restaurants and shops. According to City-Data, 86 new single-family house building permits were issued in 2012 (no data for 2013), the highest amount since 1997. Durant's population has grown 24.7% from 2000 to 2013, and 6.5% from 2010 to 2013 to an estimate of 16,891 (according to the Census).

  13. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by zookeeper View Post
    Ardmore is booming. I-35 halfway between OKC and Dallas. That city has changed so much over the last 15 years.
    Yep... We have owned land in Ardmore for about 10 years now and spend most weekends, and plan to retire, there. It is amazing how much things have changed.... Downtown Ardmore has really gone through a renaissance of sorts and is always packed on Friday and Saturday nights. They have a vibrant performing arts culture going on there too.

    And while I'm no fan of chain restaurants..... They are building a Chick-fil-a at Rockford and 12th.

    If you are in the area be sure and go downtown and check out the antique shops and boutiques that have popped up and also try places like Ten Star Pizza, Red Dirt Brewery, Cafe Alley, and Edamame.... All are kicking out top notch food.

  14. #39

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by turnpup View Post
    The Chickasaw Nation is apparently a very big player down there. They employ a lot of people and they've poured a lot of money into that economy. They even have their own police force. Still not sure how that works with the Ada PD. Anyone know?
    The Ada PD works with the Chickasaw police on different things, so its good that they work together, speaking of the the Ada PD, there getting a new police station, the fire department is getting a new station, Ada is also building a new sports complex and downtown is getting improvements.

  15. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by OK BBQ Eater Anonymous View Post
    Yep... We have owned land in Ardmore for about 10 years now and spend most weekends, and plan to retire, there. It is amazing how much things have changed.... Downtown Ardmore has really gone through a renaissance of sorts and is always packed on Friday and Saturday nights. They have a vibrant performing arts culture going on there too.

    And while I'm no fan of chain restaurants..... They are building a Chick-fil-a at Rockford and 12th.

    If you are in the area be sure and go downtown and check out the antique shops and boutiques that have popped up and also try places like Ten Star Pizza, Red Dirt Brewery, Cafe Alley, and Edamame.... All are kicking out top notch food.
    It's certainly not the only reason for the boom, but Ardmore's downtown benefitted greatly from a long-running and very successful Main Street program.

  16. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by Urbanized View Post
    It's certainly not the only reason for the boom, but Ardmore's downtown benefitted greatly from a long-running and very successful Main Street program.
    Yes they have... In the last 10 years it has gone from ghost town to destination.... I was sad when The Cellar closed their doors recently. That chef was turning out some high caliber meals.

    The only thing I have really seen take a turn for the worse in Ardmore is the BBQ scene.... When we bought our land there were several locally owned Q-raunts that turned out solid Q..... Since then all but one have gone out of business and now a Rib Crib has moved in and is always busy...... I guess I need to start offering classes down there to teach people about good BBQ.

  17. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    I take it Budro's has dropped off? I went there a couple of times close to ten years ago and thought it decent. Not life-changing, but good.

  18. #43

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Of all the small, rural towns and cities, in Oklahoma, that we drove through, on three relatively recent road trips, there was something about Poteau that really impressed me. I can't put my finger on just what it was that left such a positive impression, but Poteau had such a good vibe to it along with a nice, old downtown section with a great little (very popular) restaurant. I was also "wowed" by Bartlesville, but I wouldn't consider it "rural." Pawhuska is apparently trying to make a comeback, but it struck me as a once vibrant little city on the verge of "ghost-townism."

  19. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by Urbanized View Post
    I take it Budro's has dropped off? I went there a couple of times close to ten years ago and thought it decent. Not life-changing, but good.
    I ate at Budro's twice and did not enjoy either visit. They still do a pretty good business. Parking lot is always full on weekends.

  20. Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Expect to see development along the Red River continue for the forseeable future between I-35 and U.S. Highway 75. There have been some challenges (Pointe Vista - Golf, Marina & Resort), but the confluence of the states of Oklahoma and Texas, the Chickasaw and Choctaw nations and growth of the DFW Metroplex make it a natural. In my opinion, real property on the Oklahoma side is far more visually attractive and desirable than that on the Texas side.

  21. #46

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Agree completely. This area reminds me a lot of what you are seeing in Eastern Pennsylvania with NYC/NJ pushing out that way.

    Texans buying up property in OK has actually been a "thing" for some time now. Much lower property taxes is the main draw. Also, I find Southern OK to be far more scenic than anything in N Texas. Over time I image the scarcity of water rights in TX will continue to push people north of the Red River.

    Speaking of taxes, part of the reason Durant has had a ton of success in luring logistics firms is these types of companies are usually very land-intensive. One could cut their property tax in half just moving 10-15 miles north. I was actually quite surprised to see Bryant County growing much faster than Grayson County TX across the Red River.

  22. #47

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Quote Originally Posted by RadicalModerate View Post
    Of all the small, rural towns and cities, in Oklahoma, that we drove through, on three relatively recent road trips, there was something about Poteau that really impressed me. I can't put my finger on just what it was that left such a positive impression, but Poteau had such a good vibe to it along with a nice, old downtown section with a great little (very popular) restaurant. I was also "wowed" by Bartlesville, but I wouldn't consider it "rural." Pawhuska is apparently trying to make a comeback, but it struck me as a once vibrant little city on the verge of "ghost-townism."
    Poteau is actually fairly reliant on Fort Smith, Arkansas. By and large it is a bedroom community like El Reno is to OKC. Towns like that, currently, are doing well. If there is ever a strong push towards urbanism in America they could be in trouble.

  23. #48

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    If Conoco hadn't decimated Ponca City, it would easily be one of the classiest towns in the state. But now, they struggle. It's still a nice little town though.

  24. #49

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    Last I heard, the smaller towns in Oklahoma were actually starting to grow again. That is awesome considered they've been on a downwards spiral since the 90's, if I recall right. I heard it was mainly because of the oil boom. I just really hope that they reinvest in their core and revitalizing their main streets instead of sprawling out.

  25. #50

    Default Re: Progressive Rural Cities

    If you have't seen it yet, Chickasha has an awesome downtown. It's huge compared to what I thought it would be. I went down there to pick up a fridge for a friend, and I was completely amazed. What an awesome little city!

    https://www.google.com/search?q=Chic...ntown&tbm=isch

Thread Information

Users Browsing this Thread

There are currently 1 users browsing this thread. (0 members and 1 guests)

Similar Threads

  1. New Streetcar Routes in Other Cities
    By shane453 in forum Transportation
    Replies: 229
    Last Post: 08-09-2016, 02:08 PM
  2. America's Favorite Cities.
    By okclee in forum General Civic Issues
    Replies: 29
    Last Post: 06-12-2007, 02:01 PM
  3. Best cities to live
    By Easy180 in forum General Civic Issues
    Replies: 3
    Last Post: 07-21-2006, 03:22 PM
  4. Progressive Bulbar Palsy - Doctor wanted
    By BarbaraHarper in forum Current Events & Open Topic
    Replies: 0
    Last Post: 08-15-2005, 07:57 PM
  5. Fittest and Fattest Cities
    By Patrick in forum Current Events & Open Topic
    Replies: 8
    Last Post: 01-10-2005, 10:10 PM

Bookmarks

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •  
Single Sign On provided by vBSSO