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  1. #1

    Default Pop Culture Museum


  2. #2

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Sounds great, but don't venture into the comments... Here's a shining example: "Why can't we have something better than a museum that most people won't go to? It'd be smarter to use that money on an amusement park or something like that so that the children can actually have something to do in this city other then drugs, parties, and shootings."

  3. #3

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    We have one of those down here, it is next to a head shop.....

    [http://samopc.org/]South Austin Museum of Popular Culture[/url]

  4. #4

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    It sounds great (wish it was coming here instead)!

  5. #5

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Another classic OKC bias at the Capitol. The American Indian Cultural Museum, which has failed to meet its side of the financial obligation in fundraising, is coming to the state again for a bond issue...for the 4th time, with Governor Fallin stating publicly that Tulsa's museum won't get funded until it is finished.

    What are the chances this would ever happened in reverse? Slim to none. The Tribes (Oklahoma is 3rd in the Nation in gaming revenue) can step up and pay for the balance of the museum. The state has spent almost $90 million on it so far, and it costs about $6 million a year for debt service.

    http://www.tulsaworld.com/opinion/ar...1_CUTLIN409229

    This, my friends is bulls***

  6. #6

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Agree, the tribes should help complete the AICCM. Tulsa's private donors should build the Pop Museum. Tulsa has DEEP pockets and should be able to build it without funding from the state.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    The AICCM is not a tribal development. It is a state project that probably should have never been started. It is just one step above a zoo with people instead of animals.

  8. #8

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Finally:

    Audit requested
    Sen. Patrick Anderson said last week he has requested the state auditor and inspector conduct an audit regarding the use of state dollars for the construction of the cultural center and museum. Anderson, R-Enid, said the state owes more than $5.5 million annually in debt service payments on previous bond issues for the project.

    The museum is to highlight American Indian culture from Oklahoma and across the country. Federal grants for the project total up to $14.5 million, including stimulus dollars.

    Oklahoma City donated land for the project. The museum complex, which is expected to include lodging and art galleries, is off Eastern Avenue and Interstate 40.

    Supporters say it is expected to bring in nearly $7.5 million a year in state tax revenue after it’s completed.

    Read more: http://newsok.com/bill-advances-in-o...#ixzz1Md20CfOx

  9. #9

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    $7.5 million per year in tax revenue? Someone is smoking the peace pipe when no one is looking. That simply is not mathmatically reasonable. The state sales tax rate is 4.5%. It would have to generate $166 million in annual revenue to do that. That is $3.2 million per week. That is not going to happen - no way, no how.

    As for the audit - I am glad to see. They have spent $90 million dollars and all they have to show for it is a big mound of dirt and some structural work.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    I suspect they are talking direct and indirect expenditures Kerry, just like other places do. Folks come, and they spend funds for food, lodging, gift items, etc.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry View Post
    The AICCM is not a tribal development. It is a state project that probably should have never been started. It is just one step above a zoo with people instead of animals.
    It is a tribal development. The state gave them millions when they made it clear (after breaking ground) that they were uninterested in using their smoke shop and casino profits on their museum.

  12. #12

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan View Post
    It is a tribal development. The state gave them millions when they made it clear (after breaking ground) that they were uninterested in using their smoke shop and casino profits on their museum.
    Spartan - It is state project. The AICCM was created by the State Legislature.

  13. #13

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Kerry View Post
    Spartan - It is state project. The AICCM was created by the State Legislature.
    You're exactly right about this one, Kerry. This is a quote directly from their website:

    "The American Indian Cultural Center & Museum is a place like no other illustrating how essential American Indian people have been to the State, Nation and World. In 1994 the Oklahoma legislature created the Native American Cultural and Educational Authority, a state agency authorized to develop the American Indian Cultural Center & Museum generating awareness and understanding of the history of tribes and their relationship to Oklahoma today.The American Indian Cultural Center & Museum will enrich the quality of life, culturally and economically or all visitors, the Oklahoma City community and the region at large."

  14. #14

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by BG918 View Post
    Agree, the tribes should help complete the AICCM. Tulsa's private donors should build the Pop Museum. Tulsa has DEEP pockets and should be able to build it without funding from the state.
    Yeah..huh..wait what? You had me there at first. The AICCM shouldn't get any more money (until after the audit and maybe not then either) and the Pop Museum should get its fair share and funded. The Pop Museum is part of the Oklahoma Historical Society's master plan, just like the Oklahoma History Center Museum in OKC was. And you talk about private donors, if you want to be real about it OKC has great corporate citizens and donors but they chose to support an NBA team. And that's the truth. Tulsa's donors have to fund the neccesities that make a thriving city that the state refuses to.

    You're preaching to the choir with that comment BG918.

  15. #15

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Well, the OHS is named after a number of private donors who put money into it, primarily Pickens and Gaylord.

  16. #16

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Spartan View Post
    Well, the OHS is named after a number of private donors who put money into it, primarily Pickens and Gaylord.
    Sorry to resurrect this old thread, but this is incorrect. The Oklahoma Heritage Center (not a state agency) is named for Gaylord and Pickens, NOT the Oklahoma History Center (state agency), which is a completely different organization.

  17. #17

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Backers of popular culture museum for Tulsa want another chance

    Supporters of the Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture again are seeking a $42.5 million bond issue. They tell a House committee that the OK Pop will produce enough revenue to pay its operating costs and that the state won't have to appropriate new funds to make the bond issue's debt service payments.


    Read more: Backers of popular culture museum for Tulsa want another chance | NewsOK.com

  18. Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Quote Originally Posted by Pete View Post
    Backers of popular culture museum for Tulsa want another chance

    Supporters of the Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture again are seeking a $42.5 million bond issue. They tell a House committee that the OK Pop will produce enough revenue to pay its operating costs and that the state won't have to appropriate new funds to make the bond issue's debt service payments.


    Read more: Backers of popular culture museum for Tulsa want another chance | NewsOK.com
    There might be space available for them in the Union Depot building.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum


  20. #20

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    ....in conjunction with finishing the AICM.

  21. #21

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Until the 'I'm more conservabot than you' crowd gets its act together and tackles the sorely needed work at the capitol itself and moves on the Med Examiner facility, both critical needs, it seems unlikely they could come together to approve bonds for either the AICCM or the Pop Museum.

  22. #22

  23. #23

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Whatever happened to this? This would be amazing to see built.

  24. #24

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    Well, with no help from anyone here, I managed to find an article this summer about it.

    OKPOP supporters to try again next year

    Jamie Oldaker toured the world drumming for the likes of Eric Clapton, among others, but he never lost touch with Oklahoma, where he honed the skills that enabled him to spend his life making music.

    Oldaker, who grew up in Tulsa, has lent his support to a group pushing for the construction of a museum that would showcase the many contributions to music, acting, writing and the arts by people with ties to the state.

    “People just need to be aware that Oklahoma’s not just a bunch of cowboys running around and Indian casinos,” Oldaker said recently by phone from his home in Norman.

    “I’m proud to be an Okie and the state of Oklahoma that supported us all those years.”

    Despite the support of Oldaker and other accomplished artists for the Oklahoma Museum of Popular Culture, which was conceived of seven years ago, it has failed to secure the $40 million in state funding needed to construct the building in Tulsa’s Brady Arts District. With the project in limbo, many of the 100,000-plus donated items, including films, recordings and other memorabilia, are sitting in boxes at the state’s history center in Oklahoma City.

    The museum proposal has had a rough go of it in the Legislature. In 2013, plans to seek financing were withdrawn so the state could focus on rebuilding after tornadoes raked several Oklahoma City suburbs.

    This year, the project took a back seat to a $188 million budget shortfall.

    The museum, nicknamed OKPOP, wasn’t the only high-concept development to fall victim to the budget ax this year. Plans to appropriate $40 million to match another $40 million in pledges from private donors to complete the building of the American Indian Cultural Center and Museum in Oklahoma City went nowhere. That museum sits unfinished along the banks of the Oklahoma River.

    Backers of OKPOP have vowed to lobby the Legislature again in 2015, saying it’s vital to have a place that documents the story of popular culture in Oklahoma — from Leon Russell to Kings of Leon, and just about everybody in between.

    Last year, Russell donated more than 4,500 items to the planned museum, including thousands of photos, more than 1,300 audio recordings, 100 video recordings and old concert programs, posters and tickets, among other artifacts in the Rock and Roll Hall of Famer’s vast collection. Oldaker has donated a drum kit he used while playing for Clapton in the 1980s.

    “I’ve got an asset that has worldwide marketability,” said Bob Blackburn, executive director of the Oklahoma Historical Society. “What we’ve got to do is get financing for the bricks and mortar. Once we get that solved, everything else will fall into line. But I’ve got to get that piece of the puzzle.”

    If OKPOP gets the money, Blackburn says the museum will be self-supporting, thanks to revenue from admission fees, special events it would host and a 600-car parking garage that would be built next to the museum.

    Some lawmakers see the potential tourism draw for the state.

    “I think it will be a much better mood, especially if our revenues increase,” said state Sen. Gary Stanislawski, R-Tulsa.

    “I would see the pop museum as the centerpiece for the entire area and something we can actually advertise to other states that we have this very cutting-edge, great exhibit of Oklahoma talent.”

    Oldaker — like some of the other artists who trace their roots and careers to Oklahoma — said he’s prepared to support the cause in any way he can next year, and he urged fellow celebrities to follow suit.

    The risk of the state going without a place like OKPOP?

    “There’s (items) sitting around that are going to end up on someone’s garage sale table, and it’s going to be tossed out,” Oldaker said.

    - OKPOP supporters to try again next year - Tulsa World: Government

  25. #25

    Default Re: Pop Culture Museum

    I really hope this happens. If this did, this could really be a starter for some great development in the area. That coupled with a new tower from Williams, would be some good projects to get the ball rolling. Downtown Tulsa needs some major TLC and quick.

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