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  1. #1

    Default Oklahoma liquor laws

    http://www.news9.com/Global/story.asp?S=13482397

    Rusty Surette, News 9

    OKLAHOMA CITY -- Beer lovers across Oklahoma will tell you our neighbors to the south have stronger, better beer, but News 9 is finally setting the record straight on this issue.

    Most believe the six-point beer you can buy in Texas stores easily trumps Oklahoma's lower 3.2 beer, but believe it or not, there's not much of a difference between the two.............................

    ..........Some lawmakers have been toying with the idea of changing some of our liquor laws and that's making a lot of retailers in Texas nervous. Especially those along the border. They feel the more accessible beer and liquor is here in Oklahoma, and the more we realize there's really no difference between the two, the more money they're likely to lose.

  2. #2

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    I am all for the change. Let out of state retailers go suck eggs.

  3. #3

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Most believe the six-point beer you can buy in Texas stores easily trumps Oklahoma's lower 3.2 beer, but believe it or not, there's not much of a difference between the two
    It's always funny to me how many people still believe Bud Light in Texas is 6.0 beer.

    Really all we need is the ability to buy cold beer in liquor stores, imo. At least then you could buy beer or wine cold in Oklahoma. As of now, that's the ONLY thing you can't get at all. Sure, grocery stores would be more convenient for some, but I think we should start with at least being able to get cold beer or wine period.

  4. #4

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Back in Virginia, the beer sold in liquor stores wasn't refrigerated. At least I never saw any. I did see refrigerated beer in DC liquor stores. Virginia sells wine in grocery stores but I never saw wine refrigerated, either. Just Mike's hard lemonade and beer - that sort of thing.

  5. #5

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    If there isn't that much of an alcohol difference, the least we can do is start measuring our beer with the same scale as the other 45 states that measure by volume.

    Shouldn't need an act of congress to do this?

    Also do we really believe the person giving us this information...
    "The difference in the alcohol content is very minor," said the Oklahoma Malt Beverage Association's Brett Robinson. He'll be the first to tell you the difference in alcohol content between the beer sold here and the beer sold in Texas is really insignificant.
    After all he does work for the Oklahoma Malt Beverage Association.

    Lastly lawmakers need to stop,
    toying with the idea of changing some of our liquor laws
    , and Make it happen. This is another way to increase state revenue instead of giving it to our neighboring states.

    I am getting so tired of this topic coming up every few months and nothing is happening because our fat and happy state politicians don't want to upset their good ole boy lobbyist fishin' buddies.

  6. Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    And stop making me NOT able to buy a bottle of wine on Sunday too. It's soooooo stupid. It doesn't happen all the time, but there have been several occasions when I would have liked to have some wine with my nice sunday dinner, or needed it for a recipe. But it's Sunday, so I'm screwed. Doesn't stop me from getting a case at the grocery store, but can't go to a liquor store.

    And for that matter, stop forcing only liquor stores to sell wine. Although if the liquor stores were open on Sunday, I wouldn't care.

    What I don't want to see is something like Alabama has though. You can buy beer and wine at the grocery store, but any other type of alcohol has to be sold at the state-run liquor stores. Can we say conflict of interest? Seriously, just let anyone that buys the license to sell the stuff, sell it.

  7. #7

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    A question comes to mind. Is the 6 point beer in Oklahoma liquor stores measured by volume or weight? If it is also measured by weight, then it would be almost 50% stronger than the Texas 6 point beer.

  8. #8
    Lord Helmet Guest

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by bombermwc View Post
    And stop making me NOT able to buy a bottle of wine on Sunday too. It's soooooo stupid.
    You forget, God doesn't like wine...unless it's part of one of his son's magic tricks...then its ok. That's why you can't get it on Sundays.

  9. #9

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Wow. Valuable info I did not know before. Thanks LH...Not.

  10. #10

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Here's a good reference:

    http://www.realbeer.com/edu/health/calories.php

    Notice that "a beer that is 4.0% by volume is about 3.2% by weight". So by our standards hardly ANY common beers are 6.0 and most are below 6.0 by volume.

  11. #11

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    If you are drinking to get drunk...go with Olde English 800...like the professional drunks do...

  12. #12

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Actually... This is JUST like the Lingerie Football League.... it's morally unacceptable to to have that 6.0 beer in this state... how sinful!

  13. #13

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    It's so silly. I can go to a bar right now and get 13% Belgian beer if I want it, nice and cold, and I can do that all the way up to 2 a.m. What's the big deal about "high point" beers in grocery stores? Really the answer is nothing. It's just that the law is as it has been a very long time, originating in a completely different era, and Oklahoma is always extremely slow to update any of its laws.

  14. #14

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by dismayed View Post
    ... It's just that the law is as it has been a very long time, originating in a completely different era, and Oklahoma is always extremely slow to update any of its laws.
    It's as much, or more, that certain interests are rather vested in keeping matters as they currently stand, and those interests pay to play way better than those who want to see a change in hours and locations for availability or product temperature.

  15. Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by Popsy View Post
    A question comes to mind. Is the 6 point beer in Oklahoma liquor stores measured by volume or weight? If it is also measured by weight, then it would be almost 50% stronger than the Texas 6 point beer.
    The beer sold in liquor stores in Oklahoma is the same beer sold in Texas, sans the big three domestic brands. The standard alcohol content for most pilsners (such as Molson Canadian, Labatt Blue, Budweiser and Miller) are 5.0% by volume. Ales are typically 5.5% by volume. Most Mexican beers are between 4% and 5% by volume.

    To answer your question, no. Beer sold in OKlahoma's liquor stores are measured by volume, which is the industry standard.
    Continue the Renaissance!!!

  16. Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by Platemaker View Post
    Actually... This is JUST like the Lingerie Football League.... it's morally unacceptable to to have that 6.0 beer in this state... how sinful!
    Ugh, how many times must I explain this? There IS 6.0 beer in Oklahoma, sold in the liquor store and at the bar. And it isn't even 6.0% by volume. That is the typical alcohol content of malt liquor and barley wine.

    Oklahoma DOES allow Budweiser, Coors Millers to sell regular beer (5.0% by volume) in Oklahoma liquor stores, but those three companies have a moratorium on Oklahoma right now because Oklahoma law does not allow franchising between beverage manufacturers and wholesale distributors. Coors Brewing Co., Miller and InBev(AB) require a franchise agreement among distributors that require distributors to follow company policy on marketing and QC.

    So, Oklahoma will need to change the law to allow franchising between distributors and beverage makers in order for the big three brewers to end the moratorium. Now, the reason the big three sell 3.2 beer in Oklahoma is because 3.2 beer is exempt from Oklahoma's liquor laws. This is because grocery stores (who were already selling 3.2 beer before liquor was legalized in 1959) fought to be exempt from having to follow the regulations that liquor stores would be forced to follow.

    The beer brands that you find today in Oklahoma's liquor stores (Molson, Corona, Labatt, Samual Adams, Tecate, Shiner, etc) don't care about franchising, so they sell in Oklahoma.

    Has nothing to do with morality, or the old state myth that it was to keep indians from getting drunk, or any other goofy conclusion people come to.
    Continue the Renaissance!!!

  17. #17

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    I don't have as much of problem with the distribution laws as I do not allowing microbreweries to sell their 'high-point' beer on the premises. This effectively outlaws brewpubs, except those that brew 3.2 like Coach's or Bricktown Brewery. There would be a much larger craft beer industry here if that law was repealed. I'd like to see more places like COOP Ale Works in OKC or Marshall's in Tulsa (both of which produce great beer) be able to offer brewery tours/tasting as well as sell their beers on location and not just in liquor stores or the handful of bars/restaurants that buy their product.

  18. #18
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    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by bombermwc View Post
    And stop making me NOT able to buy a bottle of wine on Sunday too. It's soooooo stupid. It doesn't happen all the time, but there have been several occasions when I would have liked to have some wine with my nice sunday dinner, or needed it for a recipe. But it's Sunday, so I'm screwed. Doesn't stop me from getting a case at the grocery store, but can't go to a liquor store.

    And for that matter, stop forcing only liquor stores to sell wine. Although if the liquor stores were open on Sunday, I wouldn't care.

    What I don't want to see is something like Alabama has though. You can buy beer and wine at the grocery store, but any other type of alcohol has to be sold at the state-run liquor stores. Can we say conflict of interest? Seriously, just let anyone that buys the license to sell the stuff, sell it.
    Well, as with the fact that car dealers love the law that doesn't allow them to open on Sundays, no doubt, the same goes with Oklahoma liquor store operators. Since they never have to worry about their competitors opening on Sundays also helps living with such laws easy.

  19. #19

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Lots of good info here. "Minor difference?" Just about anyone can taste a drastic difference between regular and low point. I will be visiting texas shortly and will be spending hundreds of my Oklahoma earned money on Texas beer and Texas' economy.

  20. Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Why do that when you get better quality beers in Oklahoma liquor stores? Bud, Coors and Miller are not great beers, IMO. However, many people do prefer those three and lawmakers need to give Oklahomans one less excuse to go to Texas.
    Continue the Renaissance!!!

  21. #21

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Reviving this old thread because of recent news reports...

    Did anyone hear the news reports about the possibility of some of the more popular beer labels like Bud being sold in Oklahoma liquor stores? Remember, many of the more popular beer manufacturers refuse to stock their brew on Oklahoma liquor shelves because of no refrigeration law.

    I believe it was local FOX Channel 25 who reported this on the morning news (September 17, 2013).


    Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion:

    The reason: measurements.

    In Texas, the alcoholic content of beer is measured by volume. In Oklahoma, the alcoholic content of beer is measured by weight. In fact, Oklahoma is one of only five states left in the nation that measure the alcohol content in beer by weight.

    "So, let's say a domestic premium light beer from Texas is around 4 percent," said Robinson. "When you convert that to alcohol by weight, which is how Oklahoma's 3.2 percent beer is weighed, it comes out to be about 3.3 or 3.4 percent. So, it's really insignificant."

    Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion - News9.com - Oklahoma City, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports |

    Popular Beers: http://ftpcontent.worldnow.com/griff...2000to2009.pdf

  22. #22

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.


  23. Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by Laramie View Post
    Reviving this old thread because of recent news reports...

    Did anyone hear the news reports about the possibility of some of the more popular beer labels like Bud being sold in Oklahoma liquior stores? Remember, many of the more popular beer manufacturers refuse to stock their brew on Oklahoma liquior shelves because of no refrigeration law.

    I believe it was local FOX Channel 25 who reported this on the morning news (September 17, 2013).


    Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion:

    The reason: measurements.

    In Texas, the alcoholic content of beer is measured by volume. In Oklahoma, the alcoholic content of beer is measured by weight. In fact, Oklahoma is one of only five states left in the nation that measure the alcohol content in beer by weight.

    "So, let's say a domestic premium light beer from Texas is around 4 percent," said Robinson. "When you convert that to alcohol by weight, which is how Oklahoma's 3.2 percent beer is weighed, it comes out to be about 3.3 or 3.4 percent. So, it's really insignificant."

    Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion - News9.com - Oklahoma City, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports |

    Popular Beers: http://ftpcontent.worldnow.com/griff...2000to2009.pdf
    Actually, they refused to stock because they couldn't franchise with distributors within the state. Budweiser, Coors and Miller sold beer in Oklahoa liquor stores until 1976. This news will signal an end to a 35 year-long embargo.
    Continue the Renaissance!!!

  24. #24

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    This article(Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion - News9.com - Oklahoma City, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports |) has a real bogus claim in stating" In Oklahoma liquor stores, the alcoholic content of beer must be higher than 3.2 and no domestic beers are allowed. " I can go into my local liquor store and purchase numerous domestics, SAM ADAMS, Pabst(not that I buy this), and countless others.

  25. #25

    Default Re: Another Oklahoma liquor law Thread 2010.

    Quote Originally Posted by Jersey Boss View Post
    This article(Stronger Beer In Texas Is A Drinking Delusion - News9.com - Oklahoma City, OK - News, Weather, Video and Sports |) has a real bogus claim in stating" In Oklahoma liquor stores, the alcoholic content of beer must be higher than 3.2 and no domestic beers are allowed. " I can go into my local liquor store and purchase numerous domestics, SAM ADAMS, Pabst(not that I buy this), and countless others.
    You mean you don't drink Pabst? You are not on the cutting edge of hip if you don't think PBR

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