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Thread: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

  1. #1

    Default The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    The Family and Uganda's Anti-Gay Legislation
    by Ralph E. Stone‚ Dec. 02‚ 2009

    A secretive, privately-funded group known as “The Family” or "The Fellowship," one of the most powerful, well-connected Christian fundamentalist movements in the United States has used its influence and funds through the Family’s African outreach programs to support a proposed Ugandan law that would impose the death penalty on "repeat offenders" engaging in gay sex.

    How did this draconian law come about? In March of this year, American anti-gay activists traveled to Uganda for a conference that pledged to “wipe out” homosexuality. Seven months later, David Bahti, a Ugandan lawmaker and a member of the Family sponsored the “Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009.” The proposed legislation is so severe that it may indeed wipe out gay, lesbian, bisexual and transgender Ugandans.

    Uganda already punishes gay intimacy with life in prison. The “Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009” would penalize anyone who “attempts to commit the offence” with up to seven years in jail. Additionally, a person charged will be forced to undergo an invasive medical examination to determine their HIV status. If the detainees are found to be HIV+, they may be executed.

    The Family had converted Uganda’s President Yoweri Museveni to its anti-gay brand of Christianity. The organization’s leader, Doug Coe, calls Museveni the Family’s “key man” in Africa. The Family and other anti-gay groups have long viewed Uganda as a laboratory to experiment with Christian theocracy.

    Museveni was once the poster child for African democracy. But lately, under his guidance, horrific war crimes have been committed in the Great Lakes region of Uganda, and continuing human rights violations are claiming the lives of millions.

    With passage of “Anti-Homosexuality Bill 2009,” the 20-year-old Musevene regime, supported by the United States and many European governments, would disavow many international treaties on human rights. This proposed law would allow for extradition of homosexuals living in other countries back to Uganda--violating current international norms.

    It is estimated that half of Uganda’s annual budget comes through international aid. The United States Government must investigate the abuses of human rights and to re-evaluate the United States support of the Musevene regime, especially in light of this proposed anti-gay legislation.

    List of prominent Family members

    This is a partial member list focusing on well-known and influential members of the Family.

    Members currently in the US Congress
    Name Position Notoriety
    Sam Brownback[1][81] Sen. (R-KS) Chair of Senate Values Action Team
    James Inhofe[1][81] Sen. (R-OK)
    Jim DeMint[1][81] Sen. (R-SC) Chairman of Steering Committee
    Chuck Grassley[81] Sen. (R-IA) Former Chairman of Finance Committee
    Richard Lugar[4] Sen. (R-IN) Former Chairman, Foreign Relations Committee
    John Ensign[1][81][82] Sen. (R-NV) Involved in sex scandal
    Tom Coburn[1][81] Sen. (R-OK) Acted as go between for Sen.Ensign and his mistress and her family.
    Mark Pryor[1][81] Sen. (D-AR)
    Bill Nelson[1][81] Sen. (D-FL)
    John Thune[81] Sen. (R-SD)
    Mike Enzi[81] Sen. (R-WY)
    Joe Pitts[1][81][82] Rep. (R-PA) Chair of House Values Action Team; Member Committees on Energy & Commerce, Sec. & Coop in Europe
    Todd Tiahrt[83] Rep. (R-KS)
    Frank Wolf[24] Rep. (R-VA) Member of House Appropriations Panel[1]
    Zach Wamp[1][24] Rep. (R-TN)
    Mike McIntyre[24] Rep.(D-NC)
    Bart Stupak[1][82] Rep. (D-MI) Author of the Stupak-Pitts Amendment for the Affordable Health Care for America Act that would ban federal funding for abortions.[84]
    Michael F. Doyle[1] Rep. (D-PA)
    Heath Shuler[1] Rep.(D-NC)
    Jerry Moran[1] Rep. (R-KS)


    Members currently serving as state governors
    Name Position Notoriety
    Mark Sanford[69] Gov. (R-SC) Involved in sex scandal


    Current Family members formerly serving in the executive branchName Position Notoriety
    John Ashcroft[85] Attorney General AG under G.W. Bush; Also Sen. (R-MO), Member CNP
    Dan Quayle[86] Vice President Also former Sen. (R-IN)
    James Baker[4] Secretary of State Served under G.H.W. Bush
    Robert "Bud" McFarlane[87] National Security Adviser Iran-Contra conspirator; served under Reagan
    Ed Meese[88] Attorney General Served under Reagan; also Member CNP
    Charles Colson[89] Special Counsel Watergate conspirator; served under Nixon; joined the Fellowship after leaving executive branch; served time in prison
    Melvin Laird[24] Secretary of Defense Persuaded Ford to pardon Nixon[24]


    Current Family members formerly in the US CongressName Position Notoriety
    Don Nickles[33] Sen. (R-OK) Also Member Council for National Policy
    Mark Hatfield[4] Sen. (R-OR) Chairman of Appropriations Committee
    Pete Domenici[81] Sen. (R-NM)
    Dan Coats[85] Sen. (R-IN) Promoted Faith-Based Initiatives
    Chip Pickering[69] Rep. (R-MS) Involved in sex scandal
    Tony P. Hall[90] Rep. (D-OH) Also UN ambassador for hunger issues under G.W. Bush


    Current Family members formerly in the US militaryName Rank Notoriety
    John W. Vessey[4] Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff
    David C. Jones[91] Chairman of the Joint Chiefs of Staff Also member Council on Foreign Relations


    Historical members

    The following Family members are all deceased.
    Name Position Notoriety
    Richard C. Halverson[1] US Senate chaplain "[O]ne of the first to join the Fellowship under found Abraham Vereide in the 1950s."[1]
    Richard Nixon[87] US President Joined Family after presidency[87]
    Gerald R. Ford[92] US President Pardoned Richard Nixon; also Member CFR
    Strom Thurmond[24] Sen. (R-SC) opponent of civil rights
    Herman Talmadge[24] Sen. (D-GA) opponent of civil rights
    John C. Stennis[4] Sen. (D-MS) opponent of civil rights
    Absalom Willis Robertson[24] Sen. (D-VA) Father of Pat Robertson
    Arthur F. Burns[92] Chief of Federal Reserve Served under Nixon
    Frank Carlson[93] Sen. (R-KS) Kingmaker for Eisenhower
    Harold K. Johnson[94] Gen., Chief of Staff of the Army

  2. #2
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    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Sorry, but I doubt that this news is of any use that would help to get rid of Sens. Inhofe and Coburn.

  3. #3

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by Bunty View Post
    Sorry, but I doubt that this news is of any use that would help to get rid of Sens. Inhofe and Coburn.
    I want them all to go before the International Court of Justice, for inciting genocide.

  4. #4

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by gmwise View Post
    I want them all to go before the International Court of Justice, for inciting genocide.
    They're not subject to the jurisdiction of the ICJ. Jurisdiction is granted by treaty and no way will the U.S. ever sign that treaty.

  5. #5

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    As stated in Article 93 of the UN Charter, all 192 UN members are automatically parties to the Court's statute.

    Current composition

    As of 6 February 2009, the composition of the Court is as follows:
    Name Country Position Elected Term End
    Hisashi Owada Japan President 2003 2012
    Peter Tomka Slovakia Vice-President 2003 2012
    Shi Jiuyong China Member 1994, 2003 2012
    Abdul G. Koroma Sierra Leone Member 1994, 2003 2012
    Awn Shawkat Al-Khasawneh Jordan Member 2000, 2009 2018
    Thomas Buergenthal United States Member 2000, 2006 2015
    Bruno Simma Germany Member 2003 2012
    Ronny Abraham France Member 2005, 2009 2018
    Sir Kenneth Keith New Zealand Member 2006 2015
    Bernardo Sepúlveda Amor Mexico Member 2006 2015
    Mohamed Bennouna Morocco Member 2006 2015
    Leonid Skotnikov Russia Member 2006 2015
    Antônio Augusto Cançado Trindade Brazil Member 2009 2018
    Abdulqawi Yusuf Somalia Member 2009 2018
    Sir Christopher John Greenwood United Kingdom

  6. #6

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by gmwise View Post
    As stated in Article 93 of the UN Charter, all 192 UN members are automatically parties to the Court's statute.

    Current composition

    As of 6 February 2009, the composition of the Court is as follows:
    Name Country Position Elected Term End
    Hisashi Owada Japan President 2003 2012
    Peter Tomka Slovakia Vice-President 2003 2012
    Shi Jiuyong China Member 1994, 2003 2012
    Abdul G. Koroma Sierra Leone Member 1994, 2003 2012
    Awn Shawkat Al-Khasawneh Jordan Member 2000, 2009 2018
    Thomas Buergenthal United States Member 2000, 2006 2015
    Bruno Simma Germany Member 2003 2012
    Ronny Abraham France Member 2005, 2009 2018
    Sir Kenneth Keith New Zealand Member 2006 2015
    Bernardo Sepúlveda Amor Mexico Member 2006 2015
    Mohamed Bennouna Morocco Member 2006 2015
    Leonid Skotnikov Russia Member 2006 2015
    Antônio Augusto Cançado Trindade Brazil Member 2009 2018
    Abdulqawi Yusuf Somalia Member 2009 2018
    Sir Christopher John Greenwood United Kingdom
    While the court might have the power to prosecute an American if they could get their hands on them, the Court has no power to compel U.S. authorities to deliver a person to the Court.

    The U.S. is not a party to any sort of treaty granting that power.

  7. #7

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    This article makes me sick. Oh yeah those christian extremists don't hate gays. No, not at all. They just want to put them to death for their "sin."

    I wish there was a time machine to send Insane-Inhofe and Kookoo-Coburn back to the Middle Ages where they belong. They'd be right at home.

    Again, this whole story makes me ILL.

  8. #8

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    No what needs to be done is a lawsuit to force these creatures to scrambled back under rocks and debris.
    They are a terrorist group, find out who gives them the money where and how its is spent.
    If you dont strike dangerous "serpents" when they slither by, they will try to kill you.

  9. #9

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Sounds like the left-wing conspiracy theorists are at it again. No offense intended, but this doesn't sound too legit. This sounds like it fits right in there with the trilateral commission, the bildebergers and black helicopters circling downtown. Remember, Obama is part of the bildebergers and should be imposing martial law any day now!(smile)

  10. #10

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    Sounds like the left-wing conspiracy theorists are at it again. No offense intended, but this doesn't sound too legit. This sounds like it fits right in there with the trilateral commission, the bildebergers and black helicopters circling downtown. Remember, Obama is part of the bildebergers and should be imposing martial law any day now!(smile)
    Mugs you can research it for yourself.
    try and use Google.

    or let me help you just a little.
    http://www.gop12.com/2009/07/family-...-c-street.html

    http://www.npr.org/templates/story/s...ryId=106115324

  11. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    GM - I know its in there, but so are the bildebergers and the trilaterals and all sorts of conspiracy theories. Hell, you can even find garbage that says Bush and Cheney planned and implemented the plan to fly airliners and shoot missles at the World Trade Center. It doesn't mean its accurate. Some things are just a little too fishy and far out.

    My mother's talked about it before under another name. She hears it on that late night talk show on AM radio - the same show that talks about alien invasions and the Rockefellers still running the earth.

    But who knows? Tiger Woods played around on his wife..... (sigh). No heroes anymore.

  12. #12

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    GM - I know its in there, but so are the bildebergers and the trilaterals and all sorts of conspiracy theories. Hell, you can even find garbage that says Bush and Cheney planned and implemented the plan to fly airliners and shoot missles at the World Trade Center. It doesn't mean its accurate. Some things are just a little too fishy and far out.

    My mother's talked about it before under another name. She hears it on that late night talk show on AM radio - the same show that talks about alien invasions and the Rockefellers still running the earth.

    But who knows? Tiger Woods played around on his wife..... (sigh). No heroes anymore.
    lol so you didnt read it, BUT you're ready to believe the "teabaggers or the birthers"?

  13. #13

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    GM - I know its in there, but so are the bildebergers and the trilaterals and all sorts of conspiracy theories. Hell, you can even find garbage that says Bush and Cheney planned and implemented the plan to fly airliners and shoot missles at the World Trade Center. It doesn't mean its accurate. Some things are just a little too fishy and far out.

    My mother's talked about it before under another name. She hears it on that late night talk show on AM radio - the same show that talks about alien invasions and the Rockefellers still running the earth.

    But who knows? Tiger Woods played around on his wife..... (sigh). No heroes anymore.


    Are you trying to say Inhofe is some sort of HERO?

  14. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Silliman View Post
    [/B]

    Are you trying to say Inhofe is some sort of HERO?
    How in the world did you infer that from what I said? It was reference that anything is possible in today's world - even Tiger Woods, someone a lot of people thought was a positive role model, is a louse. Anything's possible.

  15. #15

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    If Uganda Executes Gays, Will American Christians be Complicit?

    A bill currently before the Ugandan Parliament sounds like an absurdity scenario from some liberal nightmare about a theocratic state: Under the proposed law -- which appears to have strong public support -- criminal penalties on homosexual acts in the East African nation would be made much harsher, and include the death penalty.

    Killing homosexuals for having sex? Just as shocking, however, are the links between the proposal and American Christians who have at times been rousing cheerleaders for Uganda's draconian statutes.

    A key episode in the trail of evidence was an event in March 2009 in the capital, Kampala, that drew three well-known conservative Christian activists from the United States who are prominent in the so-called ex-gay movement that seeks to "convert" homosexuals to make them straight.

    The three men, Scott Lively of Abiding Truth Ministries, Don Schmierer of Exodus International and the International Healing Foundation, and Lee Brundidge, who often works with a group called Extreme Prophetic, were invited to the conference of the Family Life Network of Uganda to help organize what Lively called "an effective social and political force" to combat "anti-family Western agitators." Those agitators, he said, are led by gay activists in Europe and the United States who "plan to spread sexual anarchy throughout the world under the guise of 'human rights' and 'family planning.' "

    If that message sounds over-the-top to American ears, it plays well in places like Uganda, where grass-roots sentiment against gays and anti-gay (and anti-Western) rhetoric from hardline Muslims can set the tone of the discourse.

    In their talks to the conference of parents, politicians and educators, the trio provided a host of other anti-gay talking points as well. They said homosexuals are "out to destroy the country," according to reports from the scene, and they said that legalizing homosexuality is akin to legalizing "the molestation of children or having sex with animals." Lively, who has gained notoriety for arguing that homosexuals were the real force behind the rise of Nazism, was also invited to address the Ugandan Parliament. By his own account, his hosts "were very pleased."

    Soon after the conference, the Family Life Network and its political allies got to work and on Oct. 15 introduced the Anti-Homosexuality Bill of 2009, which aims to "protect the traditional family by prohibiting any form of sexual relations between persons of the same sex."

    Although some proponents argue that the proposed legislation is not that much worse than current laws in Uganda that criminalize gay sex, the current bill creates severe new penalties: For one thing, it would add a seven-year jail term for anyone who "attempts to commit the offense" of homosexuality or who "aids, abets, counsels or procures another to engage in acts of homosexuality." And anyone convicted of publishing information about homosexuality, or providing funds or premises for homosexual activity, would receive a seven-year jail sentence or a fine of $50,000. Authorities who fail to report homosexuals within 24 hours of discovering their behavior can be punished by up to three years in prison. Moreover, the bill defines homosexual sex (it's pretty explicit) as even attempting to touch another person of the same sex with the "intention" of having sex; this can even occur through clothing.

    But it is the provision for capital punishment for "aggravated homosexuality" -- defined as having gay sex with disabled people or anyone under 18, or when the accused is HIV-positive -- that has raised alarms among human rights groups and some American Christians.

    Ten days after the bill's introduction, Warren Throckmorton, a well-known evangelical speaker who is himself affiliated with gay-switching ministries, wrote an online column denouncing the actions of the Lively, Schmierer and Brundidge, and pointing the finger of responsibility at his fellow believers in America:

    "Jailing or killing gays or those suspected of being gay cannot create a righteous people, and in fact may further a self-righteous people," Throckmorton wrote. "Christians in the U.S may have unwittingly contributed to the deteriorating state of freedom in Uganda. Now, we need to help right those wrongs by calling on our Ugandan brothers and sisters to back away from this bill."

    American commenters on his piece ranged from those who applauded Throckmorton's courage to those who supported the criminalization of homosexuality.

    Lively himself struck back in one of the comments: "I do not now and have never supported incarceration for homosexuals and was in Uganda to advocate for treatment of homosexuals as an alternative to incarceration, similar to what benefited me when arrested for drunk driving years ago in my pre-Christian days." He added that he does not support "the harsh law as currently proposed."

    Lively's approach would maintain the criminalization of homosexuality, however. And writing in June about his Uganda trip, Lively boasted that he encouraged Ugandans to maintain a "sufficient legal deterrent to prevent the international 'gay' juggernaut from homosexualizing the society." In a Nov. 27 interview with LifeSiteNews, a conservative Catholic Web site, Lively again blamed gay men in the West for prompting the new law. He repeated that he thought the current bill too "harsh" but he defended the criminalization of homosexuality.

    Yet much more is in play here than the actions and arguments of a handful of Christian activists from America.
    Many leading U.S. Christians have longstanding ties to churches in Uganda, and may, some argue, have had a hand in promoting the policies that culminated in the new anti-homosexuality bill.

    Many top U.S. politicians are also invested in Uganda. The Bush administration liked to present the country as a model of pro-abstinence, anti-condom AIDS prevention policies (a claim that some dispute), and author Jeff Sharlet recently revealed close ties between The Family -- the secretive network of conservative American Christians that includes leading Sens. James Inhofe, Sam Brownback, Tom Coburn and Mike Enzi -- and the Ugandan legislator, David Bahati, who introduced the tough new anti-gay bill.

    These American and African Christians have many things in common, but a frequent tie is a shared dislike -- bordering on detestation -- of homosexuality and homosexuals. Ugandan Christianity, like the faith in much of Africa and the Southern Hemisphere, is booming and orthodox on matters of sex, and is seen by Americans evangelicals in particular as fertile territory for mission work. It is also seen as a bulwark against an even more traditionalist Islam, as well as a breeding ground for Christian allies in the culture wars being fought in the West.

    Rick Warren, perhaps America's most prominent megachurch evangelical and author of the mega-selling "Purpose-Driven Life," has particularly strong ties to Uganda, which he has declared a "Purpose-Driven Nation." Warren's point man in Uganda was Martin Ssempa, a pastor who is a strong backer of the Anti-Homosexuality bill. Ssempa has appeared at Warren's Saddleback Church, although Warren distanced himself from Ssempa's views in October and said he had cut ties with him in 2007.

    But in a statement to Newsweek on Sunday, Warren also declined to condemn the pending legislation that Ssempa and others back:

    "The fundamental dignity of every person, our right to be free, and the freedom to make moral choices are gifts endowed by God, our creator," Warren said. "However, it is not my personal calling as a pastor in America to comment or interfere in the political process of other nations."
    Yet as Throckmorton has said, American Christians who have been cultivating ties and sharing views with Ugandan Christians are past the point of taking such a hands-off approach. In March 2008, Warren told Ugandan media that he supported a boycott of the Lambeth Conference of the Anglican Communion by Uganda's bishops over the issue of homosexuality -- even though Warren is a Southern Baptist. Warren also said homosexuality is not a natural way of life and thus not a human right and added, "We shall not tolerate this aspect at all."

    At the very least, such rhetoric is like throwing a lighted match into a tinderbox. Homosexuality is a taboo in many African societies to a far greater extent than it is in the United States, and in Uganda it can be a weapon against adversaries; politicians will, for example, leak the names of opponents they say are gay, and accommodating tabloids will print the names, which can end a career or result in jail time.

    American Christians who help sow such sentiments may be held liable -- at least morally -- for the results. A Nov. 18 report, "Globalizing the Culture Wars: U.S. Conservatives, African Churches, and Homophobia," from the liberal think tank Political Research Associates (PRA), documents how extensive -- and influential -- those contacts are.

    "Just as the United States and other northern societies routinely dump our outlawed or expired chemicals, pharmaceuticals, machinery, and cultural detritus on African and other Third World countries, we now export a political discourse and public policies our own society has discarded as outdated and dangerous," Tarso Luís Ramos, head of the PRA, says in the foreword to the report. "Africa's anti-gay campaigns are to a substantial degree made in the U.S.A."
    Whether those campaigns will succeed is still an open question. Despite wide support for the bill in parliament, Ugandan President Yoweri Museveni may seek to stall the legislation for fear of losing international support.

    But many Ugandan church leaders have also signaled their support for the broader bill if the death-penalty provision is removed. "I think the death penalty is not acceptable," Anglican Bishop Stanley Ntagali of Masindi-Kitara diocese has said. "I think taking someone to jail for a period of time would be sufficient."

    With an estimated 500,000 gays and lesbians among Uganda's 31 million residents, they better start building prisons fast.

    Keep in mind the Nazis killed gays in addition the Jews.

  16. #16

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    I seem to remember a old World War 2 "why we fight" series.
    ""If you see either of of these bozos dont hesitate"".

  17. #17

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    How in the world did you infer that from what I said? It was reference that anything is possible in today's world - even Tiger Woods, someone a lot of people thought was a positive role model, is a louse. Anything's possible.
    Just using logic. More than anything, the Uganda article is an indictment of Inhofe as well as those of like mind.

    You chose to refute the article by equating it's conclusions to those of dubious conspiracy theories, to which you included bildeburgers and others.

    This, to me, was your way of excusing "the family" by dismissing the article's principle points. Then you added, by way of recent relevations which makes us question our assumptions, sometimes our positive "role models" let us down.

    From there, since the article was critical of Inhofe and since the revelations surprise you, it has to be assumed you had Inhofe in the "role model" category.

  18. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Silliman View Post
    Just using logic. More than anything, the Uganda article is an indictment of Inhofe as well as those of like mind.

    You chose to refute the article by equating it's conclusions to those of dubious conspiracy theories, to which you included bildeburgers and others.

    This, to me, was your way of excusing "the family" by dismissing the article's principle points. Then you added, by way of recent relevations which makes us question our assumptions, sometimes our positive "role models" let us down.

    From there, since the article was critical of Inhofe and since the revelations surprise you, it has to be assumed you had Inhofe in the "role model" category.
    Nah, Inhofe is too right for my tastes to be anything close to a role model.

    My opinion is that the entire scope of the assertions in the article just sound too far-fetched to me that so many people could be in on, and support something that did what this article implies. Someone would talk and spill the beans. It just sounds like conspiracy theory material. Besides, with the network media eager to report anything that would put the Republican party in bad light, they would be on top of this in a heartbeat if there were substance to it.

    When you look into the author's other writings, the stances taken, his criticizms and his support points take on a straight party far left wing political writer. He is as predictable as Sen. Inhofe is predictably right wing. My intention is not to criticize the writer's opinions but he has a political axe to grind. Some breaking news originates from writers like Mr. Stone, but its been nearly a week and no other organization has followed on it. If nothing else happens, I have to dismiss it as - as Mr. Stone likes to say, blarney.

    Now, if there are more revelations that come out then there may be something to it. As I said, maybe not so clearly, I wouldn't have believed the Tiger Woods scandal if someone simply wrote about it.

  19. #19

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    Nah, Inhofe is too right for my tastes to be anything close to a role model.

    My opinion is that the entire scope of the assertions in the article just sound too far-fetched to me that so many people could be in on, and support something that did what this article implies. Someone would talk and spill the beans. It just sounds like conspiracy theory material. Besides, with the network media eager to report anything that would put the Republican party in bad light, they would be on top of this in a heartbeat if there were substance to it.

    When you look into the author's other writings, the stances taken, his criticizms and his support points take on a straight party far left wing political writer. He is as predictable as Sen. Inhofe is predictably right wing. My intention is not to criticize the writer's opinions but he has a political axe to grind. Some breaking news originates from writers like Mr. Stone, but its been nearly a week and no other organization has followed on it. If nothing else happens, I have to dismiss it as - as Mr. Stone likes to say, blarney.

    Now, if there are more revelations that come out then there may be something to it. As I said, maybe not so clearly, I wouldn't have believed the Tiger Woods scandal if someone simply wrote about it.
    I'll concede your points.
    Inhofe has been quoted from time to time as "doing his Africa thing" which I assume is the Uganda project which he also does on our dime.

    Inhofe had some potential but his attitude always stood in his way. And, from time to time his statements are fodder for comedy. He's an embarrassment.

  20. #20

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Silliman View Post
    I'll concede your points.
    Inhofe has been quoted from time to time as "doing his Africa thing" which I assume is the Uganda project which he also does on our dime.

    Inhofe had some potential but his attitude always stood in his way. And, from time to time his statements are fodder for comedy. He's an embarrassment.
    If it wasnt genocide that this man stands for it would be comedic.

  21. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    GM - wild accusation alert! Prove it? What genocide has he stood for? Show me an article? Show me something that supports your position that isn't from some wild-eyed left wing fanatic you dug out of some backswamp no-reader alternate publication? Show me a mainstream media article of any type that shows Inhofe is in support of any genocidal program.

  22. #22

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Quote Originally Posted by mugofbeer View Post
    GM - wild accusation alert! Prove it? What genocide has he stood for? Show me an article? Show me something that supports your position that isn't from some wild-eyed left wing fanatic you dug out of some backswamp no-reader alternate publication? Show me a mainstream media article of any type that shows Inhofe is in support of any genocidal program.
    READ THE 1ST POSTING!!!
    ARE YOU TO LAZY TO VERIFIED OR TOO SCARE; OR ARE YOU JUSTIFYING IT ?
    Are you a Holocaust denier as well?
    "All that is necessary for the triumph of evil is that good men do nothing." (Edmund Burke)
    Uganda Is Sanctioning Gay Genocide » Propeller
    Nov 23, 2009 ... Sexual violence is everywhere in Uganda. A new bill punishing homosexuals is ... You even appear to be saying that gay people bring genocide on themselves. ...http://www.usnews.com/blogs/god-and-...-gay-bill.html

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/world/2009...ntence-gay-sex
    http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/...rticle1376503/
    http://www.splcenter.org/blog/2009/0...nar-in-uganda/
    http://www.amnesty.org.uk/news_details.asp?NewsID=18454

  23. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    Thats not mainstream media and the author, which I DID take the time to research, writes a constant stream of stereotypical left wing garbage. Plus, there was nothing in his article that gives sufficient backup or proof that anything he said was the truth. He's a 3rd rate political pundit impersonating as a writer. Really, GM, if something about this were to show up on one of the mainstream media outlets I might have some reason to believe it but its too far out to believe just because this kook wrote an article about it. Like I said, my mom listens to some middle of the nite AM talk radio guy that fills her full of crap about bildebergers and the Rockefellers and how Obama is part of the society and will be imposing martial law any day now. This guy is the same thing but on the left. When some legitimate media outlet give some evidence that this story has one shred of truth in it, I will believe it. Otherwise, its simply internet garbage.

  24. #24

    Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    I thought is a first step or can you not google it on your own.

  25. Default Re: The Family” or "The Fellowship opts for genocide in Uganda

    GM, I've done all that because your little snippet was the first I'd ever heard of such an "organization" and the assertions were so outrageous I wanted to see proof. I've looked into it and I've read the support given about it and my conclusion is that its nothing more than wild speculation. I read this and other pieces from the author and what I read is what led me to my opinion. If there were any credibility to it, the major media would be all over it. Its like 9-11 conspiracy theory. When CNN or ABC or AP or the New York Times gives some confirmable facts then I'll believe it.

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