View Full Version : Tipping Norms



Pages : [1] 2

Jeepnokc
12-19-2018, 02:41 PM
This came up in another thread and was curious as to other people's opinion. Especially after talking to a friend that is a bartender at a nice cocktail bar. What is your normal tipping amount? Does it change from a restaurant to a bar (ie...eating dinner and being waited on versus just getting drinks? Do you tip less if it counter service versus table service? Do you tip different amounts depending on level of establishment (waffle house versus mickey mantles)?

Also, how old are you if you don't mind sharing. I thought the norm was 20% but according to my bartender friend, the norm is about 10% but the older patrons tip closer to 20% as norm.

FighttheGoodFight
12-19-2018, 02:45 PM
15% is the lowest I have ever given and that was for bad service. I can't bring myself to just not tip. 18 to 20% is normal. The only time I don't really tip is when I do To-Go orders. I don't really see why I need to.

For drinks I do a dollar a drink unless the service is extremely good.

Roger S
12-19-2018, 02:54 PM
Just turned 50 a few days ago and I either double the tax or up to 20%.... On a rare occasion I may tip higher but it takes some exceptional service or if I've come into some unexpected money.

Jersey Boss
12-19-2018, 02:57 PM
Counter service- no tip
Bar, getting beer on tap- 15%. If I get one on "the house" tip goes up. Mixed drink is usually whiskey and water, 15%.
Table service regardless of level of establishment-20%
Tap room run by the owner or any other place that the owner serves-no tip.
Pick up order- no tip
64yoa

pure
12-19-2018, 04:51 PM
I usually do 20% and round up, IE: if 20% of the bill is $4.62, I'll just leave a $5.00 tip. I may round down if I get bad service, but luckily not very typical.

For work, I'm only allowed to tip 15% on my corporate card.

to add to the conversation, what do you guys tip at a buffet? 20% seems too much to me when I'm getting my own food. If I go to a Chinese buffet, I may only leave a dollar on an $8 check.

aDark
12-19-2018, 08:37 PM
Order food at a counter and clean up after myself - no tip
Order food at a counter but they bring me food and they clean up - 10%
Ordering drinks at a bar - 20% norm with 25% for good service
Table service - 20% norm with 25% for good service or a little more because my one-year-old just threw his on the ground and I can't clean it up.
Tap Room - same as ordering drinks at a bar
Pick up to-go from restaurant - ~10%. When I bar-tended at a restaurant in college I did not expect any tip for to-go foods. I only tip on to-go pickup b/c my friends tell me it is the norm. Changing times I guess

The hardest is Sonic. I don't ever have any cash or loose change. I want to tip the carhop as I know running food to cars in the elements can be grueling and pays little. Sonic needs to allow credit card users to tip. Feels bad and I rarely go to Sonic as I don't want to leave the carhop hanging. (drive thru resolves this issue)

Edited to add 31-years-old. Worked in the service industry throughout college.

Thomas Vu
12-19-2018, 09:03 PM
TIp 20% unless at a buffet , then I tip 10. In my 30's

OKCbyTRANSFER
12-19-2018, 09:12 PM
I'm not a fan of the country top tip jar we see in so many establishments. I find those very awkward honestly

MadMonk
12-20-2018, 07:03 AM
Generally for any restaurant where I'm being waited on, it's 20% across the board unless it's my daughter waiting on me, then it's close to 50%. :D

For counter service, I generally don't tip. However, if it's a situation where I'm asking for advice or recommendations on a menu item or something I'll give a little bit, maybe 10% or so if they are good about it. That seems fair to me.

I'm curious more about HOW you're tipping these days. Do you add it to your credit or debit card slip, or do you leave cash? I try to leave cash as much as possible, but I carry less and less of it these days.

Jeepnokc
12-20-2018, 07:10 AM
The hardest is Sonic. I don't ever have any cash or loose change. I want to tip the carhop as I know running food to cars in the elements can be grueling and pays little. Sonic needs to allow credit card users to tip. Feels bad and I rarely go to Sonic as I don't want to leave the carhop hanging. (drive thru resolves this issue).

I have started going some to Sonic to get a limeades now that you can order from the app and get 1/2 off all the time. I am also frustrated that the app does not allow you an option to tip either.

Jersey Boss
12-20-2018, 07:42 AM
I also make it a point to tip using cash.

jerrywall
12-20-2018, 07:46 AM
I typically tip on a card. I'd prefer to tip cash, but rarely have the cash on hand (or if I do, it's a couple of 20's). So unless the total works out right, it ends up easier to put it on the card. I'm of two minds about it, since I've worked on both ends of a tip pool.

Johnb911
12-20-2018, 07:51 AM
I'm 34 and from this general area of the country (I think that probably plays into it)

I try to do around 20% (rounded to the nearest whole dollar amount) if I'm at a restaurant and being waited on. Counter service (like the Garage), takeout (Panang 2....mmmmmmmm) or drinks at a bar is going to be more like 10%. I also usually don't tip on the taxed amount but the bill before tax.

Better service and the tip goes up up up! Or, if my kids are being particularly awful, well then there's usually a guilt tip in there.

Libbymin
12-20-2018, 11:24 AM
15% is the lowest I have ever given and that was for bad service. I can't bring myself to just not tip. 18 to 20% is normal. The only time I don't really tip is when I do To-Go orders. I don't really see why I need to.

For drinks I do a dollar a drink unless the service is extremely good.


For to-go orders, if it's the type of situation where it's a restaurant where the bartender or waiter is going out of their way to bring my food as opposed to someone checking me out at a counter, then I will often times tip 10%.

TheirTheir
12-20-2018, 02:24 PM
If everything I need is completed in a reasonable amount of time, I tip 20% - as should be standard.
If I know the server, or the server has clearly gone out of their way to make my experience better, I tip more accordingly.
If I have a bad experience that I am certain the server is at fault, I tip 10%.

I don't try to rationalize tipping less. Every bartender and server in America expects a 20% tip for doing their job correctly. If your drink is $12 and you tip 1 dollar, you are not tipping enough. I'm sure those of you who tip this way will not like being told that, but it's the truth. You are not tipping your bartenders enough and if you are a regular, that is the first thing they remember about you when you walk in.

jerrywall
12-20-2018, 02:57 PM
Well then coin beer night must be hell on them...

Bullbear
12-20-2018, 03:03 PM
47 here.
I pretty much time 20% across the board for drinks at bar or dining.
for a great experience provided by server or bartender then it increases from 20%
Counter service I still tip closer to 10% depending on setup if I am also clearing my own tray then less or not at all.
If you are a regular at any bar and get occasional comps then you can bet your tipping well enough. and I'd say I'm over 20% on bars I frequent and get comps.

schrist
12-20-2018, 03:09 PM
if everything i need is completed in a reasonable amount of time, i tip 20% - as should be standard.
If i know the server, or the server has clearly gone out of their way to make my experience better, i tip more accordingly.
If i have a bad experience that i am certain the server is at fault, i tip 10%.

I don't try to rationalize tipping less. Every bartender and server in america expects a 20% tip for doing their job correctly. If your drink is $12 and you tip 1 dollar, you are not tipping enough. I'm sure those of you who tip this way will not like being told that, but it's the truth. You are not tipping your bartenders enough and if you are a regular, that is the first thing they remember about you when you walk in.

This! This! This!

Jeepnokc
12-20-2018, 08:42 PM
If everything I need is completed in a reasonable amount of time, I tip 20% - as should be standard.
If I know the server, or the server has clearly gone out of their way to make my experience better, I tip more accordingly.
If I have a bad experience that I am certain the server is at fault, I tip 10%.

I don't try to rationalize tipping less. Every bartender and server in America expects a 20% tip for doing their job correctly. If your drink is $12 and you tip 1 dollar, you are not tipping enough. I'm sure those of you who tip this way will not like being told that, but it's the truth. You are not tipping your bartenders enough and if you are a regular, that is the first thing they remember about you when you walk in.

What if the service is being lessened but the pricing isn't? You have to get your own water from a water stand or you no longer have a server at the table to take drink orders, refill waters, and take away dirty glasses but are forced to go to the bar to order or and get your own refills .....do you still tip the same 20%? What justifies the 20% when they aren't providing anything other than counter service when you tip 20% at other establishments in the same price range that have servers that take your order, gives you water, and takes away dirty glasses? (This is the question that prompted me to start thread)

TheirTheir
12-21-2018, 07:17 AM
What if the service is being lessened but the pricing isn't? You have to get your own water from a water stand or you no longer have a server at the table to take drink orders, refill waters, and take away dirty glasses but are forced to go to the bar to order or and get your own refills .....do you still tip the same 20%? What justifies the 20% when they aren't providing anything other than counter service when you tip 20% at other establishments in the same price range that have servers that take your order, gives you water, and takes away dirty glasses? (This is the question that prompted me to start thread)

The 20% is only standard for good old-fashioned table service. If I'm at Cafe 501, where you order at the counter, take a number and then your order is delivered to you, I will usually tip a dollar on my credit card slip. They do fill your drinks there.

I suppose I adhere to the viewpoint that the food industry is notoriously annoying and if my extra dollar helps out the young folks working there, I'm happy to do it. However, I admittedly have a limited understanding of how pay is structured at these ever-common counter service style restaurants that are popping up. I'm not thrilled by them.

Bill Robertson
12-21-2018, 08:05 AM
I have, just recently in fact, tipped as low as 10%. I pretty much was ignored that day so my wallet ignored her. That very seldom happens. Usually 20 to 25% on the grand total so that actually makes it more than that. If I get really exceptional service from someone that really seems to want to be there serving I go up from there. It’s not completely unknown for me to tip 35 to 40%.

BBatesokc
12-26-2018, 06:50 PM
I’m pretty much a 15-20% tipper for good service. If the service is bad, then I don’t tip (Why anyone rewards bad service is beyond me).

EXCEPTIONS; Counter service, no tip. To go orders, no tip unless prepping the to go is complex (this is rare). Haircut, 50%. Buffet, no tip. Delivery, 20-30% tip.

I also hate when they basically shame you into tipping - either with a jar in your face, presenting you with a payment screen where you have to decline a tip or the rare occasion the staff literally verbally solicits a tip.

Though I rarely see this anymore (except at Mexican restaurants, where it’s understandable) I get really annoyed when restaurants charge a fee for sharing a meal.

jerrywall
12-27-2018, 09:43 AM
Gotta ask... Haircut, 50%? Is this the norm. Growing up, it was a dollar with a $5 barber cut. Obviously, I know that's changed, but I'm used to tipping $2-3 dollars when I take my kids to get cut. I sure hope my wife isn't tipping 50% with her stylist. Might explain where the money goes...

Oh, on the buffet. Back when my kids were younger, we'd always leave a tip on the table when we ate out as a family. We don't do buffets anymore, but if we did at this point, I wouldn't feel as inclined to tip (as we wouldn't create a mess).

OkiePoke
12-27-2018, 09:46 AM
What about at coffee shops? I don't tip here.

Easy180
12-27-2018, 09:50 AM
20% for waiters and waitresses and $1 per drink if I’m just grabbing a drink to go at a bar.

BBatesokc
12-27-2018, 11:01 AM
Gotta ask... Haircut, 50%? Is this the norm. Growing up, it was a dollar with a $5 barber cut. Obviously, I know that's changed, but I'm used to tipping $2-3 dollars when I take my kids to get cut. I sure hope my wife isn't tipping 50% with her stylist. Might explain where the money goes...

Oh, on the buffet. Back when my kids were younger, we'd always leave a tip on the table when we ate out as a family. We don't do buffets anymore, but if we did at this point, I wouldn't feel as inclined to tip (as we wouldn't create a mess).

My haircuts are only $10. I give her $15.

My thought is, if I have a bad experience at a restaurant, probably nobody is ever gonna know. If my stylist screws up my hair, everyone will know for weeks. Plus she does my brows, ears, etc. and I've been going to her for years.

PaddyShack
12-27-2018, 11:06 AM
I tip $5 to my barber instead of a % based amount. He raised prices a few months back but left me at the original price, so the tip gets me to his new price.

Bill Robertson
12-27-2018, 12:38 PM
After reading this Iím on the upper end. Now I know why so many servers know my name and want us to sit with them. I thought it was my charming personality.

TheirTheir
12-27-2018, 12:47 PM
My wife is a hair stylist and says it is common for men to leave a $10 tip on a $30 cut. However, her shop is in Nichols Hills.

TheTravellers
12-28-2018, 11:51 AM
My wife is a hair stylist and says it is common for men to leave a $10 tip on a $30 cut. However, her shop is in Nichols Hills.

I leave $5 for a $15 cut, my guy's around NW 36th/May. :)

jerrywall
12-28-2018, 12:06 PM
30% seems a lot more reasonable, although if I had the need for haircuts, and found a place doing them for $10, I might be inclined to be more generous. :D

BBatesokc
12-28-2018, 04:34 PM
30% seems a lot more reasonable, although if I had the need for haircuts, and found a place doing them for $10, I might be inclined to be more generous. :D

Great Clips. Every November they sell a loadable gift card for $9.99 haircuts. I buy 10 or so each year and then supplement with $6.99 and $7.99 specials when they have them randomly.

derp
12-28-2018, 10:26 PM
38 M Here.

20% or more for table service and bar service. 10% for buffet. I almost always tip, even for bad service, but recently left 0 for bar service at a place where the bartender was intentionally ignoring us.

I HATE the tipping portion of payment services at coffee shops and the like.

mugofbeer
12-30-2018, 06:13 PM
Many states and individual businesses around the country are upping their minimum wages. using the example of a local chain of casual Denver restaurants that now pay $15/hr, would you stll tip? Tip less or the same? l haven't eaten there lately but at $15/hr which is as much as people in many, many other jobs, l am inclined to NOT pay a tip. I realize OK doesnt have this issue yet but national chains are gling down the road of $10 -12/hr. Thoughts on this as we go through this minimum wage debate,

BBatesokc
12-30-2018, 06:20 PM
Many states and individual businesses around the country are upping their minimum wages. using the example of a local chain of casual Denver restaurants that now pay $15/hr, would you stll tip? Tip less or the same? l haven't eaten there lately but at $15/hr which is as much as people in many, many other jobs, l am inclined to NOT pay a tip. I realize OK doesnt have this issue yet but national chains are gling down the road of $10 -12/hr. Thoughts on this as we go through this minimum wage debate,

I would assume that if I patronize a restaurant that upped it's wages from $2.13 to $15/hr then I'm going to see a noticeable bump in menu prices.

I certainly would not tip 20% if the base wage for my waiter is $15/hr (especially if the prices go up).

GoGators
12-31-2018, 02:37 PM
15% for good service is a bad tip. i don't think I've ever tipped below 20% but i don't go out looking for "bad service" and a reason not to tip. If you leave zero for tip at a restaurant for any reason you are a bad person. i say this as someone who has never held a service position in my life. If I make a mistake at work or have a bad day my company still pays me my full salary.

jerrywall
12-31-2018, 03:02 PM
If I'm eating out, I'm a customer, not the employer.

BBatesokc
12-31-2018, 04:23 PM
15% for good service is a bad tip. i don't think I've ever tipped below 20% but i don't go out looking for "bad service" and a reason not to tip. If you leave zero for tip at a restaurant for any reason you are a bad person. i say this as someone who has never held a service position in my life. If I make a mistake at work or have a bad day my company still pays me my full salary.

Well, I 100% disagree - as someone who HAS worked several restaurant/bar jobs in the past - even in management.

I knew that my income was based on the level of service I provided. Those who consistently give excellent service and choose their place of employment wisely are handsomely rewarded.

If you tip 15-20% for poor service, then where is the incentive to actually give good service?

To say not leaving a tip makes someone a 'a bad person' is total and complete B.S.

ctchandler
12-31-2018, 08:44 PM
For a short while after my mother threw my dad out for cheating, she worked as a waitress. She always said, always leave something because nothing means you might have just forgotten but a very small tip indicated that you were not happy with the service. So, if I receive bad service it's 5% or less. I haven't done that often because I usually receive good service.
C. T.

jerrywall
12-31-2018, 10:42 PM
Ditto. I can count on hand hand I've had to withhold part of most of a tip. But to act like wait staff get a pass on delivering unacceptable service is absurd. No one is obligated to pay for any unacceptable goods or services. If I fail to live up to my end in a custom software project, then I wont get paid. This is not usual. Tipping is payment for a service.

BBatesokc
01-01-2019, 10:26 AM
For a short while after my mother threw my dad out for cheating, she worked as a waitress. She always said, always leave something because nothing means you might have just forgotten but a very small tip indicated that you were not happy with the service. So, if I receive bad service it's 5% or less. I haven't done that often because I usually receive good service.
C. T.

Yeah. I've done that too. However, twice over the years I've found it actually provokes a negative response from the waitperson. As in, they took great offense to it (like I'd given them the finger instead of simply reflecting their poor service in my tip) and wanted to get confrontational. I often now don't leave a tip but do either let the waitperson know I was dissatisfied. If it's a serious problem then I contact the manager. Usually though it's just inattentive, unexperienced staff that have a negative attitude.

Laramie
01-01-2019, 12:03 PM
Try more than anything to evaluate the situation and conditions the workers are positioned along with the various seasons (Thanksgiving, Christmas, New Years, Valentine's Day, St.Patrick's Day...).

The worker assigned to my area regardless of the restaurant, food establishment is who & what you want to evaluate and reward. Accuracy of the order, attractiveness of the food and establishment and the service. If you've ever worked in food service, believe me it's one of the most thankless jobs anyone can occupy.

You have customers who you will never please. If the customer is having a bad day; maybe s(he) wants to past some of that drama off on you--you become the punching bag that person(s) decides to vent their anger.

I try to tip 15% - 20% of my total bill; usually bring along some extra cash because some restaurants don't accept tips when you pay with a credit card with a designated tip amount. Had several tips that didn't show up on my debit/credit card. Also, the workers at the buffets work just as hard even though the restaurant is self serve a la carte.

While at the Golden Corral MacArthur-Reno, I carelessly dropped a $100 bill. The Latino male worker who saw me drop it quickly picked it up caught up with me outside and immediately called it to my attention as I walked onto the parking lot. I quickly attempted to give him $20 from my wallet--he refused saying he couldn't accept a tip under those conditions. So, I stuffed it in his apron and said, 'put it in church or make a donation to your favorite charity.'

I attempt to consider the condition and the situation.

GoGators
01-02-2019, 08:20 AM
I often now don't leave a tip but do either let the waitperson know I was dissatisfied. If it's a serious problem then I contact the manager. Usually though it's just inattentive, unexperienced staff that have a negative attitude.

How often does this happen to you? I eat out 4-8 times a week and can honestly say i cant recall ever having a bad enough experience to not leave a full tip. If this is a common occurrence it may not be the wait staff who is to blame.

With the hourly wage of tipped employees, The person being served is acting as more employer than customer.

BBatesokc
01-02-2019, 11:20 AM
How often does this happen to you? I eat out 4-8 times a week and can honestly say i cant recall ever having a bad enough experience to not leave a full tip. If this is a common occurrence it may not be the wait staff who is to blame.

With the hourly wage of tipped employees, The person being served is acting as more employer than customer.

Sorry, but the customer is the customer and not an employer. The waitstaff may rely on tips to make ends meet, but that in no way makes me their employer instead of a customer - I didn't hire them, can't fire them, don't make their schedule, didn't request them as my server, don't tell them how to dress, can't make them do anything and I certainly am not responsible for their actions..... yet, to the some, I'm this person's "employer."

Also, your insinuation that somehow I must be to blame if I get bad service is just as laughable as your insinuation I employ the waitstaff when I go out and eat.

The topic wasn't "how often do you get bad service when you go out" - the topic was simply tipping.

ctchandler
03-22-2019, 09:42 PM
Now, I need advice. I go to a couple of places for a couple of beers and fairly often I receive a "comp" beer. What should I tip? I have been figuring my tip on all served beers and add an amount (50%) on the comp beer. I usually tip about 30% on the pre-tax charge. Just need opinions.
C. T.

BBatesokc
03-23-2019, 05:43 AM
Now, I need advice. I go to a couple of places for a couple of beers and fairly often I receive a "comp" beer. What should I tip? I have been figuring my tip on all served beers and add an amount (50%) on the comp beer. I usually tip about 30% on the pre-tax charge. Just need opinions.
C. T.

I get meals and/or beverages comp'd on occasion. If I know the regular price, then I tip based on the regular price. Same goes for discounted meals (ex: Groupon, Sweet Deals, etc.). If the service and food were good to exceptional, then I tip based on the normal rate (not the discounted rate).

rte66man
03-23-2019, 09:49 AM
What about places where you order at the counter? Many now have an iPad where you are given the option of leaving a tip before you've been served. The catch for me is I don't usually carry cash so it leaves me in a bind. What do others do?

TheTravellers
03-23-2019, 12:39 PM
What about places where you order at the counter? Many now have an iPad where you are given the option of leaving a tip before you've been served. The catch for me is I don't usually carry cash so it leaves me in a bind. What do others do?

At Classen Coffee, they do that, we usually get 2 large lattes, and add $1 or so to it, but we go there often and kind of know them. If it's a place that brings it out to you after you order at the counter, I usually do 10%, maybe. If all they do is call your name/number, maybe $1, but usually not because there's no real customer service beyond their basic job.

mugofbeer
03-23-2019, 05:07 PM
l think the whole issue of pay vs. tips is getting to the point where each restaurant is going to have to post something about their pay scale. Chipotle pays something around $10ghr. for starters. A similar Denver chain called Illegal Pete's now pays around $15/hr to start. l'm certainly not going to tip at Pete's at their pay scale though the food is pretty much equal at both

jerrywall
03-23-2019, 05:18 PM
Why? Personally tipping isn't about making someone's hourly wage. That's the job for their employer.

That being said, I don't tip for counter service ?? subways, starbucks, Chipotle). I don't think it calls for tipping. But if I did have a habit of tipping there I wouldn't base it on thier pay.

mugofbeer
03-23-2019, 05:56 PM
Then why not tip the cashier at Wal Mart or the person that helps you find a suit? Why not tip the plumber and the oil change guy at Jiffy lube or your CPA?

Tipping a waiter is done because traditionally waiters were paid below standard wages and expected to provide quality service for the tip.. lf a waiter is now being paid $10 to 15 per hour, the waiter is making a full wage and does not need to be paid unless he\she really wows you and you feel so inclined.
The problem is there are a lot of places still paying low wages where a tip would be appropriate.

BBatesokc
03-25-2019, 07:58 AM
What about places where you order at the counter? Many now have an iPad where you are given the option of leaving a tip before you've been served. The catch for me is I don't usually carry cash so it leaves me in a bind. What do others do?

I hate that type of system. Encountered it again this weekend when we ate at Maples. You stand in line, order/pay/pick up your food all at the counter, get your own drinks and refills - yet, as you pay they spin the screen around and solicit a tip. I can't' tell you how annoying I find that.

Pete
03-25-2019, 08:26 AM
^

I HATE that practice to the point that unless something is exceptional, I won't go back. Same with handing you a receipt to sign with a tip line.

How do you tip when you have yet to be provided any service (other than taking your order after standing in line)?

It's incredibly uncomfortable to determine a tip beforehand and while the server is standing over you. And it really undermines the entire purpose of tipping.

Jersey Boss
03-25-2019, 08:41 AM
Sure it is awkward and annoying but no more so than declining girl scout cookies at the entrance to stores or not contributing to every Salvation Army bell ringer you run across from the days before Thanksgiving to Christmas. I always tip with cash and always for service at the end of the meal. No exceptions.

Pete
03-25-2019, 08:56 AM
^

I don't find either of those things awkward. A polite 'no thank you' is completely proper and you can chose to create a transaction or not.

This tip-at-the-counter prompt is entirely different. You have already decided to enter the establishment and place an order. Then, when all that has happened is they have taken your money, they stand over you while you are directly propmpted for a tip. It's ridiculous and IMO shows a disregard for the customer which you should be seeking to please and have return.

I don't carry cash, especially not small bills. But if anything, if they are bring me the food then have to clean up after me (because they serve on dinnerware and/or don't have a place to drop your own trash and dishes) then I'd like to leave a cash tip on the table.

alan
12-20-2019, 03:28 PM
odd that so many don't tip takeout, drive-thru, counter service, coffee shop or fast food.

but you will tip a bartender?
just curious what the thinking is?

(full disclosure i was a bartender for 10ish years)

chuck5815
12-20-2019, 04:02 PM
odd that so many don't tip takeout, drive-thru, counter service, coffee shop or fast food.

but you will tip a bartender?
just curious what the thinking is?

(full disclosure i was a bartender for 10ish years)

a dollar or two is fair for togo orders. There’s a decent amount of manpower that goes into gathering the items, packaging them, interfacing with the customer, and exchanging consideration.

The others just aren’t providing enough of a service to garner a tip. Throwing some rice and chicken into a bowl takes about 10 seconds.

As for the bartender, you’re going to see that guy all night. And he’s not going to take care of you if he suspects the tip will either be bad or non-existent.

BBatesokc
12-21-2019, 06:06 AM
odd that so many don't tip takeout, drive-thru, counter service, coffee shop or fast food.

but you will tip a bartender?
just curious what the thinking is?

(full disclosure i was a bartender for 10ish years)

I don't get that comparison at all (as someone who worked both as a bartender [ even taught it], waiter and fast-food early on in my adult life).

Zero reason to tip drive-through, typical counter service or fast food IMO. If I'm going to tip for that 'service' then I might as well walk around with a huge roll of singles to tip literally everyone I encounter all day. Not to say I haven't tipped in some of those situations - but it's rare and only because they did something exceptional.

I see the bartender, and even a nicer coffee shop, differently. Those people usually provide a complete experience; they greet you, take your order, concoct your order and interact with you. They often define my opinion of the establishment.




a dollar or two is fair for togo orders. There’s a decent amount of manpower that goes into gathering the items, packaging them, interfacing with the customer, and exchanging consideration.


The problem with togo order tipping for me, is that often there really wasn't any effort put into packing up the togo. The food is all mixed together, the order is often wrong (twice now recently with togo's from Big Truck) and in some places you get smaller serving sizes. Not to mention, many times the person ringing you up didn't actually pack up the togo.

That said, I tip the togo when we get Ted's because they make the extra effort to show you your order and make sure it's correct. Also, Ted's and a few other places we get orders togo, they actually give you larger servings than if you are in-house. I usually tip togo's at Thai places because there tend to pack things individually. I also tip for togo at places like Brielle's because they tend to give you very nice togo containers and plenty of condiments and nicer disposable silverware.

All that to say 75% of the time I don't tip in the above situations except when there is exceptional effort.

jerrywall
12-21-2019, 07:09 AM
If I'm going to tip for that 'service' then I might as well walk around with a huge roll of singles to tip literally everyone I encounter all day.

My grandfather actually did that when I was a kid. Anyone even held a door for him he tipped them a buck. But its definitely not the norm anymore and would definitely get you strange looks ((and could offend people).

Rover
12-21-2019, 10:14 AM
Yesterday I walked into. A very busy local restaurant at lunch time and bought a gift card. I was attended to immediately and with great smiles. Given how busy they were, I expected to wait some time while others were seated and served...but I didnít have to at all. So I left a nice tip for the lady who saw after me. I think great service should be rewarded with generous appreciation, thanks, and tips.