View Full Version : Warby Parker



progressiveboy
11-29-2017, 07:58 AM
Saw in the citizen access OKC building permits for Nov 27 that popular eyewear store Warby Parker is opening up a store in Classen Curve. I have been to their store in Northpark Mall in Dallas. Excellent selection, priced fairly. Great looking specs!!

Of Sound Mind
11-29-2017, 10:34 AM
Saw in the citizen access OKC building permits for Nov 27 that popular eyewear store Warby Parker is opening up a store in Classen Curve. I have been to their store in Northpark Mall in Dallas. Excellent selection, priced fairly. Great looking specs!!

http://www.okctalk.com/showthread.php?t=13061&page=54&p=1014249#post1014249

Pete
03-20-2018, 08:50 AM
Warby Parker officially opens this Saturday, March 24th.

More info from a press release:

******

Important Store Details:

Since we first set foot in OKC, we’ve grown to 65 locations around the U.S. and Canada (this store makes 66!), and we can’t wait to open this new store and keep the good times going. We’re especially excited about all that Classen Curve has to offer, from its roster of appetizing restaurants to all of the other shops in the mix.

Inside the store, there’s extra-special feature that we’re very excited to unveil. Behind the marble Reference Desk (your one-stop shop for frame adjustments, order pickups, and more) you’ll find an original, vibrantly colored mural by Oklahoma City-based artist Kris Kanaly.

Throughout the rest of the space, you’ll find design details reminiscent of a library. Think: marble-topped tables, colorful displays of books, and brass accents galore, plus our full collection of eyeglasses and sunglasses on oak shelving.

To celebrate the new spot, we’re releasing a pair of limited-edition, Oklahoma City-exclusive sunglasses: Topper in Jet Black Matte with Flash Mirrored Pacific Blue lenses.

TheirTheir
03-21-2018, 07:27 AM
Being on the older end of the millennial spectrum, I have to admit: this is the most millennial press release I have ever seen. *Here's how dope our store is with little information about our product, but who cares, because: MARBLE.

That opinion aside, I've been eagerly awaiting this store's opening as I indeed have some WP frames that need adjusting. Fortunately for me the desk I will bring them to will be extremely hip!

Pete
03-21-2018, 07:35 AM
http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/warby032118.jpg

CloudDeckMedia
04-09-2018, 07:12 AM
http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/warby032118.jpg

Curious, I dropped by WP yesterday, picked out a frame, asked the price, and received it within 30 seconds. I appreciate their transparency in not starting with a bait number, then adding on features until a breathtaking final amount is reached.

AP
04-09-2018, 07:26 AM
I've literally never had a bad experience with them and I've ordered both online and in their old showroom at Shop Good.

Timshel
04-09-2018, 09:36 AM
^

Concur with the above. I went in and ordered two sets of glasses this weekend. As seamless of an experience as I could have imagined, not to mention the two sets of glasses, together, were half the price of my current glasses.

Pete
04-09-2018, 09:40 AM
So, what was the total charge for one pair of frames and lens?

sooner88
04-09-2018, 09:50 AM
So, what was the total charge for one pair of frames and lens?

My pair I bought a couple years ago was $95 with prescription. I just have a -1.00 prescription, I know it goes up if you need something a little more complicated.

Pete
04-09-2018, 09:54 AM
^

Thanks, that's very helpful.

Also, how long does it take them to finish?

benjico
04-09-2018, 10:00 AM
^

Thanks, that's very helpful.

Also, how long does it take them to finish?

I've only bought online (great experience) and don't recall it taking very long to receive the product after ordering.

sooner88
04-09-2018, 10:06 AM
^

Thanks, that's very helpful.

Also, how long does it take them to finish?

I ordered online and don't remember waiting long at all. Like every one else has said it was a great experience online (I didn't know about the Shop Good location until after I ordered), and I imagine it is een faster with the full store open.

Also - that price is without insurance and I know they accept some forms of it. I had looked at similar options at Midtown Optical and the price was 3-4x what Warby Parker charged.

Pete
04-09-2018, 10:10 AM
Yeah, eyeglass prices are absurd and it's the direct result of what is almost a monopoly in that industry.

I really need a new pair so I'm going in there to check it out.

dankrutka
04-09-2018, 10:28 AM
I've been wearing Warby Parker since they first started selling them at ShopGood around 2010. I've always been happy with the service, price, and quality.

CloudDeckMedia
04-09-2018, 03:14 PM
My pair I bought a couple years ago was $95 with prescription. I just have a -1.00 prescription, I know it goes up if you need something a little more complicated.

The frames I looked at were $95, but the total was $300 with progressive lenses, anti-reflective & scratch-resistant coatings. A local lens shop charged me $800 a few years ago, and my first pair from Zenni.com was less than $50 for all of that. My ophthalmologist says there's no practical difference between them.

Timshel
04-09-2018, 03:52 PM
^ Mine were $95 as well (I believe the vast majority of their glasses with the basic lenses are either $95 or ~$145). I have a relatively straightforward prescription so I just got the basic lenses, which are scratch resistant, moisture repellent, anti-reflective, and provide UV protection. Just glanced at their website and progressives start at $300, so that is consistent with your experience, CloudDeck. I've heard great things about Zenni as well - probably should have checked them out before purchasing my glasses.

I will say that being able to go to the store to look at their entire range, even with their at-home try on program, was nice. The frames I ended up with weren't any of the "suggested" frames based on the quiz you can take online and I didn't like most of the frames I probably would have selected to try through the at-home program.

For those that listen to podcasts, the "How I Built That" podcast with two of WP's founders is worth a listen and provided a good anecdote regarding glasses prices and mark ups in the glasses industry. When preparing their business plan, they initially planned to sell the glasses for $30-$50 but one of their professors (they were Harvard Business School students when they came up with the idea) said it was too cheap due to people's natural perception to equate price with quality. Really makes me wonder what their cost per unit is. I imagine they're printing money at this point.

dankrutka
04-09-2018, 10:48 PM
I have terrible stigmatism and awful vision and my lenses are always very cheap. I think they go from $95 to $135 total for everything I need so I’m impressed if you can get up to $300. ;)

Urbanized
04-10-2018, 05:20 AM
Dan, if astigmatism has prevented you from laser surgery I can recommend a surgeon. He’s one of the few in OK who do Zyoptix, which is an advanced Bausch and Lomb machine. It uses a much smaller laser than most, and instead of burning off corneal tissue in a grid pattern it uses a dancing, randomized pattern. This makes for a much smoother blend zone (the transition between excised tissue and untouched tissue), and eliminates the night vision glare/starburst/halo problem, which is more pronounced for astigmatism correction owing to the shape of the astigmatism-afflicted eye.

When he did my surgery I had a -5.75 cylinder in one eye and a -6.0 in the other. A really bad astigmatism is around -3.0. I had the worst astigmatism Dr. Weir had ever attempted. Ninety seconds of burn on each eye vs ten in the average patient. The goal was simply to get me to the point where I could wear soft contacts, which I had never been able to do, and it was a complete success. I have a very minimal vision correction now, and in fact if I’d bothered to go back for an enhancement he likely could have gotten me to 20/20 or better and eliminated corrective lenses altogether. However, just being able to wear contacts (and maybe more importantly regular sunglasses) changed my life.

barrettd
04-10-2018, 06:30 AM
The frames I looked at were $95, but the total was $300 with progressive lenses, anti-reflective & scratch-resistant coatings. A local lens shop charged me $800 a few years ago, and my first pair from Zenni.com was less than $50 for all of that. My ophthalmologist says there's no practical difference between them.

Zenni is very inexpensive, but I also found the precision of the progressive lenses wasn't as good as the pair I just got from my eye doctor (which, after insurance, cost about the same as Zenni). I also got some metal frame sunglasses that pretty much fell apart after a few months of use. Having said that, I would still buy from Zenni after my insurance benefits are up, so I'm looking at getting some more sunglasses from them.

dankrutka
04-10-2018, 06:32 AM
Thanks for the rec. i’ve been thinking about it a lot lately that’s helpful.

Thomas Vu
04-10-2018, 07:20 AM
or if laser is out, consider ICL. It was expensive when I did it, but that was at least 3 years ago and hoping it's more affordable now.

Urbanized
04-10-2018, 07:25 AM
You’re welcome. I recently saw him to discuss total lens replacement. At 50 I’m in early stages of cataracts, probably owing to working outdoors much of my life and being unable to wear sunglasses for most of it. Sitting down with him again 13 years after my laser surgery only reinforced in my mind what a pro he is.

By the way with total lens replacement you’re likely to see 20/20 the rest of your life with no correction at all other than (possibly) still needing readers. Pretty pumped about that.

oklip955
04-10-2018, 07:35 AM
I just want to put in a good word about Dr Weir. I saw him only once on advise of my Optimologist in KC. He was trained by him. My Optimologist is one of the top in the country if not in the world. If Dr Hunkler says he is good then you know he is. I had unneeded eye cataract surgery in 2010 and the guy in north okc that did it messed up my right eye. I went to about 15 different eye doctors and none of them had a clue to what was wrong with my eye. I saw an one line article (optimoligy mag that Dr Hunkler wrote) and contacted his office. He fixed my eye. I still continue to drive up to KC to see him. I have since found out how great an eye doctor he is. He retired from being head of KU or KSU dept of Optimology. That is why he trained Dr Weir. (I did not see Dr Weir when I was looking for an answer to my eye problem)

Urbanized
04-10-2018, 08:07 AM
Regarding the thread topic (specifically related to Warby) I agree about both Zenni and Warby being great options. I developed an eye infection last year and had to take a break from contacts. I had taken my glasses for backup on a motorcycle trip, left them in a travel bag and then when I needed them couldn’t find them.

So rushed out in a panic and bought some Ray-Bans at a “one-hour” optical. Frames were a couple hundred, then progressive no-line bifocals (which they got wrong), polycarbonate lenses, scratch resistant coating, anti-glare, UV protection. By the time I was done they were over $400.

Later I decided I’d like to have several pair because I was enjoying the option of occasionally wearing glasses, resting my eyes from contacts, and was having to wear readers with contacts anyway. So I bought a pair from Zenni and one from Warby. Experiences were very similar. Both came fully loaded with all of the options I mention above, and for a little over $100. Maybe $120, IIRC?

The main difference was that Warby had a much better frame selection, and also seemed to be constructed better. There were only maybe 2-3 frames I’d consider at Zenni. But the ones I got look great, and I’m often complimented on them. That’s the weird thing about going contacts to glasses. When I was younger I felt like glasses were a massive liability in the attractiveness department. Now that I’m older and wear contacts most of the time I find that when I occasionally wear glasses I am almost guaranteed to get one or more appearance compliments, which pretty much never happens (haha) WITHOUT glasses.

schrist
05-25-2018, 02:08 PM
Dan, if astigmatism has prevented you from laser surgery I can recommend a surgeon. Hes one of the few in OK who do Zyoptix, which is an advanced Bausch and Lomb machine. It uses a much smaller laser than most, and instead of burning off corneal tissue in a grid pattern it uses a dancing, randomized pattern. This makes for a much smoother blend zone (the transition between excised tissue and untouched tissue), and eliminates the night vision glare/starburst/halo problem, which is more pronounced for astigmatism correction owing to the shape of the astigmatism-afflicted eye.

When he did my surgery I had a -5.75 cylinder in one eye and a -6.0 in the other. A really bad astigmatism is around -3.0. I had the worst astigmatism Dr. Weir had ever attempted. Ninety seconds of burn on each eye vs ten in the average patient. The goal was simply to get me to the point where I could wear soft contacts, which I had never been able to do, and it was a complete success. I have a very minimal vision correction now, and in fact if Id bothered to go back for an enhancement he likely could have gotten me to 20/20 or better and eliminated corrective lenses altogether. However, just being able to wear contacts (and maybe more importantly regular sunglasses) changed my life.

Thank you so much for this info! I have struggled with poor vision my whole life and laser surgery was not an option. I am in the process of having lens replacement surgery on both eyes by Dr. Weir (one is done, other this coming Wed.) and I can already see remarkably better! It has been wonderful so far! Thank you!

schrist
05-25-2018, 02:13 PM
I am in the process of having the total lens replacement by Dr. Weir (one eye is done other is next Wed) and I am so happy with the results so far! I have never in my life been able to see this well. It is expensive - but so worth it!

Thomas Vu
05-26-2018, 09:10 AM
If you're referring to ICL, I have had it done too. Expensive, but not a lot of choice for people with astigmatism. Hopefully it's gone down in price by now. I paid 3k/eye?

Motley
05-26-2018, 09:44 AM
Is ICL surgery much like cataract surgery in that the whole lens is replaced? Does cataract surgery typically correct one's vision and astigmatism as well as removing the cataracts?

Jeepnokc
05-26-2018, 10:06 AM
I am in the process of having the total lens replacement by Dr. Weir (one eye is done other is next Wed) and I am so happy with the results so far! I have never in my life been able to see this well. It is expensive - but so worth it!

I am going to have both eyes done this summer also when I get a break in my trial schedule. Curious as to which lens to use or is there one that is clearly better than the rest. I need bifocal lenses now and Dr is saying won't need contacts or glasses afterwards unless just really tired

OKCbyTRANSFER
05-26-2018, 01:23 PM
I was also told I would need lens replacement, that laser for my eyes wasn't an option, and it would run$15K, that's just out of range for me. I used to wear contacts all the time, but the past 10 years I have a difficult time, so it's glasses for me. Bifocals actually. I can't seem to adjust to the monovision in my contacts

bluedogok
05-26-2018, 07:03 PM
Is ICL surgery much like cataract surgery in that the whole lens is replaced? Does cataract surgery typically correct one's vision and astigmatism as well as removing the cataracts?
My father had cataract surgery done after wearing glasses most of his life (nearsightedness). After the surgery his distance vision is perfect but he requires reading glasses now. My eyes haven't been as bad as my sister's or my father's but at 54 I am getting to the point of needing bifocals. I still work on the computer or tablet without readers but the small print on many screens is getting more difficult.

Urbanized
05-26-2018, 08:30 PM
High astigmatism can be corrected by the Zyoptix laser by Bausch and Lomb. I had it done in 2005. I had a -5.75 cylinder in one eye and a -6.0 in the other. At the time Zyoptix was only performed at the Dean A McGee Eye institute and by my surgeon, Dr Kurt Weir. I'm guessing some others perform it now, but most laser centers still use technology that is about 25 years old.

The eye is an oblong shape in patients with high astigmatism, so a large amount of corneal tissues is removed. With traditional laser, the laser is usually about 6mm and it burns off the tissue in a grid pattern. This can leave a very pronounced/abrupt edge in the transition area or "blend zone;" the point where the surgery begins/ends. If you have large pupils and they dilate past this blend zone it will cause a halo effect and night blindness.

Zyoptix is a 2mm laser, and instead of a rigid grid, the laser dances around in a randomized pattern and creates a very smooth blend zone. This creates the best possible result in patients with high astigmatism.

A cylinder measurement of -2.0 to -3.0 is considered severe. Like I said, mine was -5.75/-6.0. I was by far the worst astigmatism Dr. Weir had ever attempted to date. In fact at the time the Zyoptix machine was only FDA approved to treat up to -3.0 and everything over that was theoretical. However there had been others done nationally and when he plugged in the numbers the machine took them, so we both decided to proceed, eyes wide open as it were. He said he believed he could get me to better than 20/40 on the first pass (which he did). The only hitch was that while most people's corneas are burned off for about 10 seconds, mine required 90 seconds per eye. It was a gut check. But I was incredibly happy with the results.

He got me to the point where I could wear extended wear soft contacts, which I could never do before, and also I was able to wear non-prescription sunglasses for the first time in my life, at nearly 40. He also was willing to try an enhancement (standard to all patients) to try to get me to 20/20 or better if I had enough corneal tissue left. I intended to do that, but was so happy simply being out of glasses for the first time since 2nd grade (needed them before that but my parents didn't know) that I just rolled with contacts the past 13 years.

Anyway, the past year or two my optometrist has been telling me that I was developing cataracts fairly early, and suggested going to see Dr. Weir to discuss total lens replacement. I qualify, and it would not be super expensive. I am probably going to wait it out a few years, but the beauty of total lens replacement is that you never have to wear glasses or contacts (other than maybe readers) for the rest of your life. Sign me up.

ctchandler
05-26-2018, 08:58 PM
Well, I have to speak up since I had my first cataract surgery when I was 49 and my second when I was 50, about six months apart and my understanding is that the lens which is replaced is not the reason for the need for glasses. After my surgeries I still needed reading glasses but my eyes were fine at 20/20 in the left and 20/25 in the right before and after surgery. I don't understand how the replacement of the lens can improve your eyesight since the plastic they put in your eye has no correction, it is simply a piece of plastic. Speaking of "correction" maybe something has changed and a real expert on this subject will "correct" me. And I hope that's the case but when I had mine done at DMEI I was told before the surgery that they were only improving my eyesight by replacing my dirty (cataracts) lens. My ophthalmologist did say that other factors caused by the surgery could require me to wear glasses but it wasn't normal and in my case he was right. By the way, my mother wore the same glasses (not the physical glasses, but the same correction) that she had worn for fifty years after her cataract surgery.
C. T.

ctchandler
05-27-2018, 10:30 AM
I did a little research and some things apparently have changed since I had my surgery (1983-1985). See below as well as the highlighted which is probably the difference between the mid 80's to now.
C. T.

9. During cataract surgery, your surgeon can also correct other eye conditions, like astigmatism.
Actually, that's true.
During cataract surgery, the natural lens in your eye is replaced with an artificial lens or intraocular lens (IOL). For some people, an advanced-technology lens could also correct their astigmatism and reduce their dependence on glasses for distance vision

Motley
05-27-2018, 10:40 AM
I am fortunate not to need correction for distance, but I cannot see anything up close or small without cheaters. Seems like lens replacement fixes cataracts for sure, and can correct for distance, but most people still need cheaters. I don't mind wearing them but am the type that misplaces or breaks them constantly.

Thomas Vu
05-27-2018, 02:15 PM
Is ICL surgery much like cataract surgery in that the whole lens is replaced? Does cataract surgery typically correct one's vision and astigmatism as well as removing the cataracts?

The procedure is pretty much the same.

Urbanized
05-27-2018, 06:06 PM
I did a little research and some things apparently have changed since I had my surgery (1983-1985). See below as well as the highlighted which is probably the difference between the mid 80's to now.
C. T.

9. During cataract surgery, your surgeon can also correct other eye conditions, like astigmatism.
Actually, that's true.
During cataract surgery, the natural lens in your eye is replaced with an artificial lens or intraocular lens (IOL). For some people, an advanced-technology lens could also correct their astigmatism and reduce their dependence on glasses for distance vision

Yep, that's the one! It gives you essentially brand new 20/20 (or better) eyes without cataracts. It can also potentially reduce presbyopia (that thing that happens over age 40 where your arms start getting too short to be able to read well), but some people still require reading glasses. Fine with me. Most of my age-related close reading issues seem to have more to do with lighting than magnification anyway.

ctchandler
05-27-2018, 08:52 PM
Most of my age-related close reading issues seem to have more to do with lighting than magnification anyway.

Lighting or very small print are/were my main reasons for grabbing my bifocals. Now, I have macular degeneration and my problems are a lot more serious. The hazards of living too long.
C. T.

schrist
05-29-2018, 10:26 AM
I did a little research and some things apparently have changed since I had my surgery (1983-1985). See below as well as the highlighted which is probably the difference between the mid 80's to now.
C. T.

9. During cataract surgery, your surgeon can also correct other eye conditions, like astigmatism.
Actually, that's true.
During cataract surgery, the natural lens in your eye is replaced with an artificial lens or intraocular lens (IOL). For some people, an advanced-technology lens could also correct their astigmatism and reduce their dependence on glasses for distance vision

This is what I have had done. I had nearsightedness, farsightedness and astigmatism. I have not been able to see anything without glasses and I was unable to wear contacts. I now can see pretty much everything! It was expensive (without insurance about $10,000), but so worth it to see things i could not see even with glasses.

OKCbyTRANSFER
07-26-2018, 08:07 AM
My pair I bought a couple years ago was $95 with prescription. I just have a -1.00 prescription, I know it goes up if you need something a little more complicated.
I went this week, picked out a pair and since I have progressives, upgraded to a thinner lens for my right side (yeah, it's coke bottle thick normally) and the price was $370, I didn't think that was bad. Takes about a week for them to come in

Bellaboo
07-26-2018, 07:45 PM
nm