View Full Version : OKC Cop and the Constitution.



Jersey Boss
10-23-2017, 09:03 AM
http://kfor.com/2017/10/20/metro-woman-claims-she-was-stopped-by-police-while-riding-bike-illegally-searched/
https://freepressokc.com/bike-ride-turns-to-fearful-encounter-with-police/


When an agent of the state violates the constitutional protections of the people it is charged with protecting, should that not be cause for termination? I mean c'mon the constitution allegedly has more authority than statutes.

rezman
10-23-2017, 09:13 AM
This kind of stuff happens all the time. This is one that just happend to make the news. Its very easy for an officer to claim that you match the description of a suspicious person. But that is not a crime. She needs to get a copy of the 911 call and the dispatch to the officer.

Jersey Boss
10-23-2017, 09:22 AM
This kind of stuff happens all the time. This is one that just happend to make the news. Its very easy for an officer to claim that you match the description of a suspicious person. But that is not a crime. She needs to get a copy of the 911 call and the dispatch to the officer.

Putting handcuffs on her and searching her belongings while not putting her under arrest is a constitutional violation. She has the right to remain silent and he had no arrest warrant. The cop had no right to search. It is a sorry state of affairs in the land of the free to be subjected to this kind of treatment. To state that this happens all the time is horrible. Great perception for the uptown entertainment district.

Bill Robertson
10-23-2017, 10:44 AM
And it’s not something new. In the late 70s - early 80s when I was in my 20s I was leaned over the hood or trunk of a police cruiser, searched and cuffed while another officer searced my vehicle. Not just once but three times. OKC twice and Warr Acres the other time. All three times because either my car or I fit the description given by a witness. I wasn’t knowledgeable enough then to know that the police can’t legally do that.

dankrutka
10-23-2017, 10:59 AM
I'm not commenting specifically on this case because I haven't researched it. But this is why it is important for citizens to use constitutional language with police officers to signal your understanding of your rights. Saying, "I do not consent to a search" and asking, "do you have probable cause or a warrant?" let's the officer know you understand the Constitution. To be clear, I'm not blaming citizens who are illegally searched, but just pointing out what citizens can do to center the discussion around their rights. Police officers know the law extremely well so if he blatantly violated her rights then there should be significant punishment. Otherwise, it undermines the integrity of the entire force.

traxx
10-23-2017, 01:25 PM
Police officers know the law extremely well

I agree with your post, but I wonder about this statement. I think police officers are supposed to know the law extremely well, I'm just skeptical if they actually do.

BBatesokc
10-23-2017, 01:48 PM
I will no longer interact with a police officer unless I am covertly recording what is being said. Over the years I've had four instances where officers crossed the line with me. Three of those times my complaints were found in my favor. The only difference in the 4th instance was that I did not have a recording of our interaction.

In each instance the officers lied to their superiors after I filed a complaint. I conveniently waited a week until I "suddenly remembered" I had our interaction on tape and turned it in. By that time the officer had already been interviewed and given his 'side' (lies).

I hate to say it, but you really can't trust anyone and police officers are no exception.

Roger S
10-23-2017, 01:58 PM
I hate to say it, but you really can't trust anyone and police officers are no exception.

Exactly.... Have been plenty of lawmen since the invention of laws that didn't have the best interest of the law on their agenda..... Just because they wear a badge doesn't make them a good person...... I would like to think that most are but you always have to be on guard for that bad apple.

Ginkasa
10-23-2017, 02:05 PM
I will no longer interact with a police officer unless I am covertly recording what is being said. Over the years I've had four instances where officers crossed the line with me. Three of those times my complaints were found in my favor. The only difference in the 4th instance was that I did not have a recording of our interaction.

In each instance the officers lied to their superiors after I filed a complaint. I conveniently waited a week until I "suddenly remembered" I had our interaction on tape and turned it in. By that time the officer had already been interviewed and given his 'side' (lies).

I hate to say it, but you really can't trust anyone and police officers are no exception.

What do you use to record the conversation? Is it just on your dash cam or do you use your phone?

BBatesokc
10-23-2017, 02:13 PM
What do you use to record the conversation? Is it just on your dash cam or do you use your phone?

Depends where the interaction is taking place. Originally (20 years ago) it was as simple as keeping my video camera pointed down and at my side while it was still recording.

Then I started putting a digital recorder in my shirt pocket. From there I progressed to my phone. For years that worked just fine. However, now officers are very leery of cell phones and often have me put it in my pocket or leave it in my car.

This is my main reason for buying an Apple Watch. I now rely on it most of the time. Works perfect as they rarely are suspicious of a watch. Even prison facilities haven't caught up to the technology and have never asked me to leave my watch in the locker before meeting with an inmate. Also, many meeting I attend that ask all participants to leave their phones out of the conference area, but never say anything about watches.

skwillz
10-23-2017, 02:23 PM
Well geez now they're going to know! (jk)

BBatesokc
10-23-2017, 02:31 PM
Well geez now they're going to know! (jk)

It's only a matter of time anyway.

Stew
10-23-2017, 03:58 PM
https://www.youtube.com/watch?time_continue=1&v=gRfgOTX5Srw

After watching the video I have questions. Is the law forbidding folks from looking at peoples driveways a state law or a city ordinance. Does this law apply to pedestrians or limited strictly to bicycle riders? What's the penalty for looking at a driveway? Also, given that Oklahoma drivers license can double as a weapon is that why the Feds are pushing us towards Real id Act compliance to board an airplane? I got to be honest until I saw this video I never knew an Oklahoma issued drivers license could be used as a weapon.

All this reminds me of this myth I learned back in school.


The right of the people to be secure in their persons, houses, papers, and effects, against unreasonable searches and seizures, shall not be violated, and no Warrants shall issue, but upon probable cause, supported by Oath or affirmation, and particularly describing the place to be searched, and the persons or things to be seized.