View Full Version : Oklahoma Population



_Kyle
03-08-2017, 09:57 PM
Oklahoma's population is nearing the 4,000,000 mark with an estimated population of 3,923,561 as of July 1st 2015. What do you all think about this growth?

ljbab728
03-08-2017, 10:53 PM
Oklahoma's population is nearing the 4,000,000 mark with an estimated population of 3,923,561 as of July 1st 2015. What do you all think about this growth?
I'm not sure what you mean. What is there to think about here? It is what it is, if those figures are correct.

dcsooner
03-09-2017, 06:11 AM
where did the figures come from?

_Kyle
03-09-2017, 09:12 AM
where did the figures come from?

https://www.census.gov/quickfacts/table/AFN120212/40

Bunty
03-18-2017, 11:55 AM
If the oil bust doesn't recover much more, then Oklahoma may be short of 4,000,000 in 2020. The 2016 figure and later ones will be more telling. A new record breaking earthquake may scare off people, but earthquakes didn't stop California from being one of the fastest growing states ever. But insane governing skills, or lack of them, exhibited at the State Capitol is bound to scare off some business and industry. Oklahoma's low cost of living, along with income tax cuts and incentives won't be so attractive if there are too many drawbacks, such as state government unable to respond to core needs, such as education. Maybe what is needed in 2018 is some Trump style candidate running for governor declaring at campaigns, "Let's Make Oklahoma Great Again!" The governing skills of such a candidate, if winner, not guaranteed.

Laramie
03-18-2017, 03:34 PM
Agree Bunty, we could use a slogan.

How about: 'Let's make Oklahoma OK again.' :D

Bunty
03-19-2017, 04:06 PM
Agree Bunty, we could use a slogan.

How about: 'Let's make Oklahoma OK again.' :D

Serious, or not, I like it at first thought. To reflect upon the license plate, I suppose those were some of the good 'ol days. But I'm afraid the comeback would be "When was Oklahoma OK?". And "OK" doesn't sound as huge as "great".

http://www.bprlicenseplates.com/xt-2276.jpg

OKCRT
03-19-2017, 05:28 PM
Only if we could move a few mountains in around the city and maybe throw in an ocean. Man wouldn't that spur some excitement. OKC/OK will always be a average to below average growth state but will be steady IMO. Even with booming oil we will not see a growth BOOM IMO. People around the country are just scared to death of tornado's it seems. Plus some of OK laws and policies are just insane compared to other parts of the country.

Laramie
03-20-2017, 10:21 AM
Only if we could move a few mountains in around the city and maybe throw in an ocean. Man wouldn't that spur some excitement. OKC/OK will always be a average to below average growth state but will be steady IMO. Even with booming oil we will not see a growth BOOM IMO. People around the country are just scared to death of tornado's it seems. Plus some of OK laws and policies are just insane compared to other parts of the country.

Give the landfills unrestricted height :D , you might have some mountains in 20 years; as for the oceans--that's another story.

bchris02
03-20-2017, 11:26 AM
Only if we could move a few mountains in around the city and maybe throw in an ocean. Man wouldn't that spur some excitement. OKC/OK will always be a average to below average growth state but will be steady IMO. Even with booming oil we will not see a growth BOOM IMO. People around the country are just scared to death of tornado's it seems. Plus some of OK laws and policies are just insane compared to other parts of the country.

I think the extreme right-wing political climate in Oklahoma really hurts the state compared to competitors. I think Oklahoma City is currently doing the best it can considering the albatross that is the state legislature. The political climate makes Oklahoma unattractive to a lot of individuals and it also makes it unattractive to corporations, especially tech companies. Education is a huge problem, but the legislature doesn't seem to be too concerned with that and is more concerned with appeasing the homeschool/Christian school movement. That is not going to make Oklahoma attractive to the countless companies fleeing California for places like Austin and Dallas. Oklahoma will never be a blue state or even a purple one, but it would be beneficial to be a little less red with a little less pandering to evangelicals. Start with a greater emphasis on public education, from Kindergarten through college/universities.

I think tornadoes and the severe weather season here makes quite a few people nervous about living in Oklahoma, but I think this concern is secondary to the state legislature.

dankrutka
03-20-2017, 11:29 AM
The political climates in Texas and Kansas and about 20 other states are almost exactly the same as Oklahoma. People in Oklahoma think their legislature is unique, but I can promise you after living in Kansas and Texas for the last 6 years that there's really almost no difference.

bchris02
03-20-2017, 11:43 AM
The political climates in Texas and Kansas and about 20 other states are almost exactly the same as Oklahoma. People in Oklahoma think their legislature is unique, but I can promise you after living in Kansas and Texas for the last 6 years that there's really almost no difference.

I'm not going to argue regarding Kansas, but the education system in Texas is a notch above Oklahoma, and I think that comes with many benefits. The fact that Texas is so large, diverse, and urban also helps keep the "crazy" in check.

For whatever reason, it seems like in Oklahoma, rural interests punch above their weight by population. I think I've read that 2/3 of the state's population lives within the two metro areas.

Bunty
03-20-2017, 12:44 PM
I think the extreme right-wing political climate in Oklahoma really hurts the state compared to competitors. I think Oklahoma City is currently doing the best it can considering the albatross that is the state legislature. The political climate makes Oklahoma unattractive to a lot of individuals and it also makes it unattractive to corporations, especially tech companies. Education is a huge problem, but the legislature doesn't seem to be too concerned with that and is more concerned with appeasing the homeschool/Christian school movement. That is not going to make Oklahoma attractive to the countless companies fleeing California for places like Austin and Dallas. Oklahoma will never be a blue state or even a purple one, but it would be beneficial to be a little less red with a little less pandering to evangelicals. Start with a greater emphasis on public education, from Kindergarten through college/universities.

I think tornadoes and the severe weather season here makes quite a few people nervous about living in Oklahoma, but I think this concern is secondary to the state legislature.
I hear ya. But let's at least give Oklahoma some credit for slowly but surely rejecting the Christian right agenda in some ways, since the turn of the century. In 2015 gaming was a $15.2 billion dollar industry in Oklahoma. But that wouldn't have happened had Oklahoma voters listened to Christian right leaders in 2004 and voted no on legalizing gaming. Against the wishes of the Christian Right, significant liquor law reform was approved in 2016. Their support for anti-LGBT bills continues to be thwarted, so far.

Oklahoma would do well to legalize marijuana to attract customers for the product from Texas. Northern Texas has around double the population of all Oklahoma. But Texas could end up beating Oklahoma to legalizing marijuana. If there is anything else that has been accepted in other states that Oklahoma can do to help its economy that Texas can't or won't do, it should do it. Oklahoma desperately needs to broaden its tax base, since raising taxes is so unacceptable. I wouldn't expect my simple ideas of tax reform by abolishing the corporate state income tax and hopefully more than make up for lost revenues by raising income tax from 5% to at least 6.5 or 7% on individuals making $75,000+ would go over well.

KayneMo
03-20-2017, 12:47 PM
I'm not going to argue regarding Kansas, but the education system in Texas is a notch above Oklahoma, and I think that comes with many benefits. The fact that Texas is so large, diverse, and urban also helps keep the "crazy" in check.

For whatever reason, it seems like in Oklahoma, rural interests punch above their weight by population. I think I've read that 2/3 of the state's population lives within the two metro areas.

About 59.6%, or 3/5 of the state's population live in the two metro areas.

1,360,000 (OKC) + 980,000 (Tulsa) = 2,340,000/3,925,000 = 0.5962

Jake
03-20-2017, 02:12 PM
North Texas has the same political climate, geography, topography, and weather as OK and is exploding with growth.

There are a lot of things that Oklahoma can improve on, but to say those things are the ones severely limiting growth seem...well, untrue.

bchris02
03-20-2017, 02:43 PM
I hear ya. But let's at least give Oklahoma some credit for slowly but surely rejecting the Christian right agenda in some ways, since the turn of the century. In 2015 gaming was a $15.2 billion dollar industry in Oklahoma. But that wouldn't have happened had Oklahoma voters listened to Christian right leaders in 2004 and voted no on legalizing gaming. Against the wishes of the Christian Right, significant liquor law reform was approved in 2016. Their support for anti-LGBT bills continues to be thwarted, so far.

Oklahoma would do well to legalize marijuana to attract customers for the product from Texas. Northern Texas has around double the population of all Oklahoma. But Texas could end up beating Oklahoma to legalizing marijuana. If there is anything else that has been accepted in other states that Oklahoma can do to help its economy that Texas can't or won't do, it should do it. Oklahoma desperately needs to broaden its tax base, since raising taxes is so unacceptable. I wouldn't expect my simple ideas of tax reform by abolishing the corporate state income tax and hopefully more than make up for lost revenues by raising income tax from 5% to at least 6.5 or 7% on individuals making $75,000+ would go over well.

I completely agree with this. Liquor law reform and criminal justice reform (providing the legislature doesn't undo it) will really help. Something has to be done about public education though.

As for marijuana legalization, that would be a huge boon for Oklahoma both economically and in terms of national image. Oklahoma City could possibly become a "cool" city to move to like Denver or Portland if the state would do this. However, it's not something that state lawmakers will even entertain, let alone actually pass. The Christian Right still currently has too much influence here for that to get anywhere in the near future. Texas will probably legalize within the next decade and Oklahoma's hand will be forced due to lost tax income as well as legally-purchased marijuana flooding across the Red River. I wouldn't be surprised if Oklahoma legalizes possession at first but keeps dispensaries illegal.

Roger S
03-20-2017, 03:15 PM
As for marijuana legalization, that would be a huge boon for Oklahoma both economically and in terms of national image. Oklahoma City could possibly become a "cool" city to move to like Denver or Portland if the state would do this. However, it's not something that state lawmakers will even entertain, let alone actually pass.

Look how long it took for tattoos to become legalized and we're still working on the liquor laws... I'd say we are at least a century away from any substantial marijuana reforms.

bchris02
03-20-2017, 03:41 PM
Look how long it took for tattoos to become legalized and we're still working on the liquor laws... I'd say we are at least a century away from any substantial marijuana reforms.

I would say more like 30 years. This issue is more generational than it is left vs right. Once Millennials are running 23rd and Lincoln, marijuana will probably get legalized. Most younger people, even here, support it.

The liquor laws have been passed so now its just a matter of waiting for October 2018. The last real blue laws that need to be struck down are Sunday liquor sales and Sunday car sales.

OKCRT
03-20-2017, 04:34 PM
Medical MaryJane right around the corner so hopefully this issue moves more swiftly than some predict.

bchris02
03-20-2017, 04:39 PM
Medical MaryJane right around the corner so hopefully this issue moves more swiftly than some predict.

Hopefully it passes. I think it would have a better shot if voted on during a Presidential election year, much like alcohol reform. Midterm election turnout leans older and more conservative.

dankrutka
03-20-2017, 07:34 PM
I'm not going to argue regarding Kansas, but the education system in Texas is a notch above Oklahoma, and I think that comes with many benefits. The fact that Texas is so large, diverse, and urban also helps keep the "crazy" in check.

No, it doesn't. You just doesn't pay attention to the Texas legislature like you do Oklahoma's. There's probably more absurd legislation going through in Texas than in Oklahoma from the pending bathroom bill to the already passed guns on college campuses... Yeah, I'd actually say Texas is worse. I agree that Oklahoma has shown an unwillingness to fund education like DFW, but rural parts of Texas aren't that different than Oklahoma.