View Full Version : To move from OKC or not...



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Bunty
05-26-2015, 11:40 AM
I've been around a lot as well. However, as much as I like Oklahoma City, I never get the warm fuzzies over returning to Oklahoma. As soon as I see the local news or read an editorial from the Oklahoman, I remember why being away was so nice. It is an island of myopic, conservative thought bought and paid for by oil and gas. And the evangelical churches on every other corner add fuel to the social conservatives. At times, it's hard to overcome that overwhelming conservative certitude (all others are communists and "libtards!") It gets really old fast.

Yeah, I'm getting tired of Republican legislators taking the right from the cities to control their destinies with most people not giving a damn about it, or outright supporting it. I don't expect much change, unless Republicans become exposed for widespread corruption.

Oh, well, it could be worse. Imagine trying to live in one of those approx. 24 counties where liquor by the drink is still banned. Surely one reason why most of those counties are declining in population.

Bullbear
05-26-2015, 11:47 AM
The positive side of being a free thinker and liberal Gay adult in such a red state.. is you really get to feel like a dirty dirty rebel all the time! lol

White Peacock
05-26-2015, 12:35 PM
Whatever you do, don't come to Portland! :D

Funny, but that's actually good life advice. Portland's my kind of city, but it's facing ridiculous times, thanks to the massive uptick in new residents, largely coming in from California. It won't be long before PDX has completely lost its charm as the affordable, unique gem of the west coast. My wife and I had a long-term plan to move back to Portland, but seeing what's becoming of the housing market, that's looking like a worse idea every day.

adaniel
05-26-2015, 01:00 PM
You can probably say that about most "it" cities. They start off as something cool but by the time their transformation is complete they are merely a playground for trustafarians and douchey wealthy elites. Brooklyn and SF are probably the most complete in this process, but the aforementioned Portland and Seattle aren't far behind.

I was looking into possibly moving into Nashville at some point in the future, but unfortunately it has been "discovered" by faux musicians and real estate bros from Austin. Housing there is now running higher than Dallas and Atlanta...oh well.

bradh
05-26-2015, 01:06 PM
You can probably say that about most "it" cities. They start off as something cool but by the time their transformation is complete they are merely a playground for trustafarians and douchey wealthy elites. Brooklyn and SF are probably the most complete in this process, but the aforementioned Portland and Seattle aren't far behind.

I was looking into possibly moving into Nashville at some point in the future, but unfortunately it has been "discovered" by faux musicians and real estate bros from Austin. Housing there is now running higher than Dallas and Atlanta...oh well.

Austin is exactly what you describe

White Peacock
05-26-2015, 03:45 PM
You can probably say that about most "it" cities. They start off as something cool but by the time their transformation is complete they are merely a playground for trustafarians and douchey wealthy elites. Brooklyn and SF are probably the most complete in this process, but the aforementioned Portland and Seattle aren't far behind.

I was looking into possibly moving into Nashville at some point in the future, but unfortunately it has been "discovered" by faux musicians and real estate bros from Austin. Housing there is now running higher than Dallas and Atlanta...oh well.

Seattle has long been there. When I lived in Portland, I remember seeing a news report about how Seattle was rated the most overpriced city in the US -- not the most expensive, but the most overpriced. Portland back then was expensive by our standards here, but by far the most affordable big city on the coast, and it just happened to also be the damn coolest. Now the housing market has gone full retard in PDX, a complete seller's market complete with bidding wars and offers of tens (or hundreds) of thousands over original asking price. Rent is rising accordingly in the more desirable neighborhoods. You could still live reasonably affordably in far SE (past 82nd) or Felony Flats, but then you're far from all the stuff that drew you to Portland in the first place. So then you may as well just move to one of the distant suburbs: Aloha, Wilsonville, Hillsboro, or what have you, since you're already going to be driving a while to get to downtown or to one of the hip SE districts. That way you can live somewhat within financial reason, have a fair commute to the city center, and still have a yard, trees, and some quiet when you want it.

Ok, cool. I've talked myself into moving into a distant Portland suburb. This has been therapeutic.

BG918
05-26-2015, 08:00 PM
Austin is exactly what you describe

Same with Denver.

I'm curious what the next wave of "it" cities will be?

SoonerDave
05-27-2015, 08:11 AM
When I was a kid, I remember going to Crossroads Mall for the first time when it opened way the heck back in 1974. I was 9, and Crossroads with an Orange Julius was the most amazing thing I'd ever seen.

By the time I was, oh, 15 or so, not so much. It was just a place to go shopping.

The point here is that, no matter where you are, there's always something or someplace newer, cooler, slicker, trendier than where you are right now. For everyone that's wealthy, there's someone wealthier. For everyone that's cool, there's someone cooler. For everyone that's smart, there's someone smarter. And so on.

I'd hope that there were more to look forward to than just a bar scene or a club scene that differentiated city X from city Y, and I freely admit those things don't remotely appeal to me; but that's just me. Heck, "vive la difference" as they say. At some point, just as we tire of new toys we just "had to have" when we were kids, as adults, the allure of the "cooler, neater" city becomes just that - perpetuated into the same allure for a different city because that new city is inevitably so much cooler than the one you left. The reality is that you're chasing perhaps an unfilled need in your own life, one that no city will really fill.

I'm surely in no position to say leave or go, because that's a decision each person has to make, but I'd sure encourage some personal introspection beforehand, because unlike many here, I do believe that "you can't go home again." Because you can't. You might leave and return, but it won't be the same. If you're single and unattached, there's no better time to get those proverbial "wild oats" sewn, but unless you feel your long-term destination is elsewhere, be cautious about the transitory allure of "that next better place." Sometimes, it can be like chasing the horizon.

Jersey Boss
05-27-2015, 09:33 AM
Make the journey and enjoy it. More older folks regret the things they haven't done, not the things they have done. What ever draws you to another destination, don't look to others to validate your decision. I moved here many decades ago, but I choose to live and work in Norman. If I were to move, neither OKC or Tulsa would be on my list.

adaniel
05-27-2015, 12:32 PM
Austin is exactly what you describe

Most definitely. Now that you see D list celebs like Jesse James and Farrah Abraham moving there, Austin has probably hit peak hipster. Hence the movement of the skinny jean crowd to Nashville.



I'd hope that there were more to look forward to than just a bar scene or a club scene that differentiated city X from city Y, and I freely admit those things don't remotely appeal to me; but that's just me. Heck, "vive la difference" as they say. At some point, just as we tire of new toys we just "had to have" when we were kids, as adults, the allure of the "cooler, neater" city becomes just that - perpetuated into the same allure for a different city because that new city is inevitably so much cooler than the one you left. The reality is that you're chasing perhaps an unfilled need in your own life, one that no city will really fill.

I'm surely in no position to say leave or go, because that's a decision each person has to make, but I'd sure encourage some personal introspection beforehand, because unlike many here, I do believe that "you can't go home again." Because you can't. You might leave and return, but it won't be the same. If you're single and unattached, there's no better time to get those proverbial "wild oats" sewn, but unless you feel your long-term destination is elsewhere, be cautious about the transitory allure of "that next better place." Sometimes, it can be like chasing the horizon.

Well said, and I can't reiterate enough. I think moving can give someone needed fresh perspective but you better be okay with what you will give up. For some people its worth it. I will just say, as an unmarried person, I really valued my social network that I had built up over the years to such an extent that I probably took it for granted. Leaving OKC and going into a new city was the first time I realized I was alone. I'm a fairly social person, so it was a rather sobering experience to say the least. It remains to be seen if the benefits of this move were worth that.

bchris02
05-28-2015, 12:35 PM
Well said, and I can't reiterate enough. I think moving can give someone needed fresh perspective but you better be okay with what you will give up. For some people its worth it. I will just say, as an unmarried person, I really valued my social network that I had built up over the years to such an extent that I probably took it for granted. Leaving OKC and going into a new city was the first time I realized I was alone. I'm a fairly social person, so it was a rather sobering experience to say the least. It remains to be seen if the benefits of this move were worth that.

From my personal experience, its difficult to replicate the level of social life you get in college when you move to a new city afterwards. The most active people I know in OKC are still involved primarily with their college alumni network. I took my social circle out in Charlotte for granted and thought it would be just as easy to develop a similar network back here in OKC but at 27 I found it extremely difficult to really get a social network established here and I still am somewhat struggling even after three years here. I am positive my experience would be completely different if I had went to school here. Like I've always said when moving its important to consider not only what you gain but what you lose. Of course, the social thing is a lot easier if you are moving to a transient city and/or are extroverted, but it still isn't going to be college.

CaptDave
05-31-2015, 03:21 PM
Whatever you do, don't come to Portland! :D


Said like a true Oregonian!

That didn't take very long! :)