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Plutonic Panda
08-08-2014, 11:59 PM
This article says up to 9 more Aldi's could be built in the OKC Area!

http://journalrecord.com/2014/08/08/aldi-growth-still-in-express-lane-real-estate/

Brett
08-09-2014, 06:05 AM
I'm glad to hear the good news.

ljbab728
08-09-2014, 07:55 PM
I'm certainly not opposed to that but it's not good news for me personally. I went into an Aldi's once and have never wanted to go back since.

mark
08-12-2014, 10:27 AM
no subscription, can't read

pickles
08-12-2014, 02:27 PM
This is really going to start putting the squeeze on Homeland's and Wal Mart's and who knows maybe even Target's.

ljbab728
08-12-2014, 10:14 PM
Sorry, but I just don't see Aldi's putting the squeeze on anyone.

bombermwc
08-13-2014, 07:36 AM
Nope. And with Winco coming in, I really doubt it.

I will say Aldi can serve as the faster in and out grocery store in town. But those cashier lines are often pretty slow, which is sad since they don't even bag anything.

JohnH_in_OKC
08-25-2014, 10:38 PM
I'm hopeful that Aldi will open a store nearer my home (near NW 41st & Independence). But with Sam's & WinCo coming to 39th Street on both sides of the Hefner Parkway, they may shy away. Aldi is my favorite grocery store & also my sister-in-law's favorite.

I can't understand anyone not liking Aldi. It is just a different way to shop. The store has new non-grocery items every week that are just amazingly priced. It's just fun to see what new crazy items Aldi is selling each week. Their grocery prices are really great compared to Walmart, Target, Crest and Homeland. You just don't have many name brand choices since they're almost entirely a generic store. And their sweetened foods are usually made with sugar, not high fructose corn syrup. Aldi is perfect for me since I'm a generic shopper almost ALWAYS!

ljbab728
08-25-2014, 11:02 PM
I'm hopeful that Aldi will open a store nearer my home (near NW 41st & Independence). But with Sam's & WinCo coming to 39th Street on both sides of the Hefner Parkway, they may shy away. Aldi is my favorite grocery store & also my sister-in-law's favorite.

I can't understand anyone not liking Aldi. It is just a different way to shop. The store has new non-grocery items every week that are just amazingly priced. It's just fun to see what new crazy items Aldi is selling each week. Their grocery prices are really great compared to Walmart, Target, Crest and Homeland. You just don't have many name brand choices since they're almost entirely a generic store. And their sweetened foods are usually made with sugar, not high fructose corn syrup. Aldi is perfect for me since I'm a generic shopper almost ALWAYS!

To each his own but I went in Aldi's once and have no desire to go back. It is a different way to shop and that's not my way.:)

zookeeper
08-25-2014, 11:24 PM
To each his own but I went in Aldi's once and have no desire to go back. It is a different way to shop and that's not my way.:)

I think we get that now. You've mentioned it three times in only eight posts. I wouldn't usually point something like this out, but you do write back remarks like mine to people all the time. BUT, we do get it - you don't like Aldi's. Check. :)

JohnH_in_OKC
10-27-2014, 04:30 PM
From Clarkhoward.com:
Does Aldi Save You as Much Money as They Claim? (http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/shopping-retail/does-aldi-save-you-much-money-they-claim/nhqgX/)

By Andy Prescott, Contributor
ClarkHoward.com

When it comes to grocery shopping, is Aldi really as cheap as they claim to be?

I recently received this advertisement (see picture) in the mail from Aldi grocery stores, which showed a sample basket of goods purchased both at Aldi and at another grocery store. The claim made is that the groceries purchased at Aldi represented savings of 42% versus the other grocery store.

While 42% is tremendous savings, the ad immediately struck me as flawed and unfair because it wasn’t comparing apples to apples (so to speak).

While the food purchased at the other grocery store were name brand goods, the food from Aldi was all store brand stuff, so of course it was cheaper.

Aldi vs. Walmart -- Battle of the Cheaps


The whole thing got me to thinking about the much more important question of how Aldi would do in a fair fight in its own weight class, against another store's house brand.

“Somebody should investigate this I thought,” then quickly realized that I was just the sort of guy who went around investigating that type of thing! So I set out to do a little grocery shopping and answer two questions.

The first question was “Is Aldi’s advertisement fair?”, but the more interesting question was “Do you really save money shopping at Aldi?”

I took a trip both to Aldi and to Walmart, the nation's largest grocery store. The first thing I did was try to price the exact items featured in the ad to see if Aldi’s claim was accurate. My results are in the following table:
(John's note: the tables below look much better in the Clarkhoward.com article (http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/shopping-retail/does-aldi-save-you-much-money-they-claim/nhqgX/))
Item National name brand
at Walmart Store brand at Aldi
100 sandwich bags $2.98 $1.99
14.4 oz graham crackers 2.98 1.39
12 oz vanilla wafers 3.28 1.49
26 oz applesauce 2.15* 1.39
9 oz fruit snacks 2.25* 1.39
17 oz sandwich cookies 3.50 1.49
6 oz raisins 1.12* 1.19
8.4 oz granola bars 2.18 1.79
30 oz mayonaise 3.98 1.99
32 oz grape jelly 2.98 1.59
1 lb ham 4.98 3.29
12 oz cheese 3.12 1.79
1 lb turkey 4.48 3.29
20 oz mustard 2.11* 0.69

Total price 42.09 24.76

Savings 41%
*Items marked with an asterisk were not available in the same size as the Aldi item. The price was adjusted to the Aldi equivalent size on a per unit basis.

As you can see from this table, Aldi’s advertisement is pretty darn accurate. Surprisingly, the prices at my local Aldi were actually a little lower than in the advertisement, and the savings of 41% were almost exactly the same as the advertised savings of 42%. But that really isn’t important. Anybody that really cares about saving money buys store brands, so how does Aldi stack up against Walmart’s store brands?

Here are those results:

Item Walmart store brand Aldi store brand
100 sandwich bags $2.48 $1.99
14.4 oz graham crackers 2.18 1.39
12 oz vanilla wafers 2.00 1.49
26 oz applesauce 1.07 * 1.39
9 oz fruit snacks 1.48 1.39
17 oz sandwich cookies 1.95 * 1.49
6 oz raisins 1.48 1.19
8.4 oz granola bars 2.00 1.79
30 oz mayonaise 2.54 1.99
32 oz grape jelly 2.92 1.59
1 lb ham 3.48 3.29
12 oz cheese 2.88 1.79
1 lb turkey 3.48 3.29
20 oz mustard 0.91* 0.69

Total price 30.86 24.76

Savings 20%
*Items marked with an asterisk were not available in the same size as the Aldi item. The price was adjusted to the Aldi equivalent size on a per unit basis.

There you have it. On the basket of goods Aldi chose to compare, the real savings versus the store brands of Walmart is 20%. While that doesn’t come close to the advertised 42%, it is very impressive anyway.

So what do you think? Is 20% enough to convince you to do your shopping at Aldi?

Comments (http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/shopping-retail/does-aldi-save-you-much-money-they-claim/nhqgX/#cmComments)

About the author: More of Andy Prescott’s work can be found at ArtofBeingCheap.com, where unlike his groceries, the articles are never generic.

JohnH_in_OKC
10-27-2014, 04:56 PM
Here's one comment posted on Clarkhoward.com (http://www.clarkhoward.com/news/clark-howard/shopping-retail/does-aldi-save-you-much-money-they-claim/nhqgX/#/comment/p1/c2567982/) that may dissuade Trader Joe's OKC advocates:

Posted by MimsyGA at 7:21 p.m. Oct. 23, 2014 Report Abuse
Just the fact that Walmart is Walmart and refuses to pay a living wage to their retail employees while the Waltons bathe in dollar bills every night is enough to make me take my business anywhere else. And Aldi is a good place to take it. It's also interesting to note that Aldi and Trader Joe's are cousins, and you can frequently find many of the same items at both stores (albeit branded Aldi's at one and TJ's at the other). $0.50-$1.00 less than TJs, average.

According to Wikipedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Trader_Joe's): Trader Joe's was founded by Joe Coulombe and has been owned since 1979 by a German family trust established by Aldi Nord's owner Theo Albrecht. The chain has offices in Monrovia, California and Boston, Massachusetts.

John's Note: The U.S. Aldi (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aldi) stores are owned by Aldi Süd (South) and don't overlap with Trader Joe's stores. They both carry many of the same products, but labeled with their own store brands.

JohnH_in_OKC
11-05-2014, 11:54 AM
I was incorrect about Aldi and Trader Joe's stores not being in the same cities.

Prunepicker
11-19-2014, 07:40 PM
I like Aldi. Mostly buy dairy, snacks and dog food. The rest I get at the commissary.
The milk isn't as good as Braum's but at $2.69 per gallon it's worth the money.

Pete
01-06-2016, 09:46 AM
Finally went in an Aldi this weekend...

First of all, it is absolutely nothing like a Trader Joe's. I didn't see one product in there that would have been common between the two stores, or anything similar whatsoever.

Secondly, I thought it was pretty awful in terms of merchandising. Completely bare bones with everything stacked in boxes and a bunch of weird, random cheap stuff (also in boxes) that took the better part of one of the few aisles. Odd household items, toys, etc.

Perhaps the prices are good? But how much better could they be to justify a relatively small store that looks more like a stockroom than a modern grocery store?


Not for me. There isn't one anywhere close to where I live but even if there were, I can't see shopping there.

Patrick
01-06-2016, 10:06 AM
I think most people like Aldi because of the price. They have most standard general staples available in generic for very cheap.

White Peacock
01-06-2016, 01:08 PM
Finally went in an Aldi this weekend...

First of all, it is absolutely nothing like a Trader Joe's. I didn't see one product in there that would have been common between the two stores, or anything similar whatsoever.

Secondly, I thought it was pretty awful in terms of merchandising. Completely bare bones with everything stacked in boxes and a bunch of weird, random cheap stuff (also in boxes) that took the better part of one of the few aisles. Odd household items, toys, etc.

Perhaps the prices are good? But how much better could they be to justify a relatively small store that looks more like a stockroom than a modern grocery store?


Not for me. There isn't one anywhere close to where I live but even if there were, I can't see shopping there.

I felt the same way the first time. As I've mentioned before in another thread, you learn how to shop at Aldi, it will suddenly click, then you come to love it.

Bullbear
01-06-2016, 01:10 PM
I usually shop at Crest. I gave Aldi a try and then compared receipt next time I went to Crest. Aldi beat every price in Crest with one exception and it was something that Crest just happened to have on sale. The store is definitely no frills and the odd toys/household items isle I find odd as well. But overall the products were good value and everything I have tried tasted great. so I will continue to shop there for staple items for sure.

White Peacock
01-06-2016, 01:12 PM
The toys/household items area can have some pretty ace finds. We got a BMI calculating digital scale (programmable with weight goals/progress and multiple user profiles, etc.) for like $20 on that aisle.

barrettd
01-06-2016, 02:00 PM
I felt the same way the first time. As I've mentioned before in another thread, you learn how to shop at Aldi, it will suddenly click, then you come to love it.

With 3 kids of all ages, Aldi's prices are terrific for a lot of the staple, mundane groceries. I've purchased some meat there, but the selection isn't great. My wife and I have made Aldi our default grocery store, and recently have added Crest to the mix for the higher tier stuff. I was not inclined to shop at Aldi for the longest time, and probably would prefer somewhere else if I didn't have so many people to feed, but the savings are real.

White Peacock
01-06-2016, 02:27 PM
With 3 kids of all ages, Aldi's prices are terrific for a lot of the staple, mundane groceries. I've purchased some meat there, but the selection isn't great. My wife and I have made Aldi our default grocery store, and recently have added Crest to the mix for the higher tier stuff. I was not inclined to shop at Aldi for the longest time, and probably would prefer somewhere else if I didn't have so many people to feed, but the savings are real.

Meat and produce are both generally lacking there, but half the time you'll find something outstanding there. It's not consistent, but still worth looking. The meat item of theirs I always keep stocked is the Polish sausage...like 14 links for under $4, it's an absurd price and they're tasty. Ground beef is also pretty good, and the frozen burger patties are another item we keep in stock. They tend to have great avocados at great prices, but hit-or-miss availability.

soonermike81
01-06-2016, 02:35 PM
Yeah Aldi is a discount grocery store with the majority of the products being private label. The main reason why they do certain things the way do, such as stocking case directly onto the shelves or having a quarter deposit for the shopping, is to cut on expenses and enable them to keep prices low. They are definitely consistently lower than their competitors, and I feel like the majority of their product is up to par as well. Honey Bunches of Oats is an exception; it's my favorite cereal. I tried Aldi's version about 10 years ago and told myself I'll stick to the name brand. Tried it again for the first time in 10 years a couple of months ago, and it still wasn't as good as the real thing. As for the random hodgepodge area, those are called "special buys." They bring in new items weekly that range from patio furniture in the summertime to Christmas toys during the holidays to Valentine's day stuffed animals. Those have been hit or miss over the years, imo. My best quality air mattress that we would take on camping trips came from Aldi. One of my wife's friends ruined it, and I have yet to find one of similar quality. And I have bought them from Wal-Mart, Target, and Bass Bro. We don't shop there as much because it's not as convenient as Target, Sprouts, and Buy 4 Less. But if it was closer and had a slightly larger assortment, I guarantee we would be saving a lot of money.

soonermike81
01-06-2016, 02:55 PM
And as far as the comparisons to Trader Joe's, the reason they are completely different is b/c they are completely different companies. ALDI USA is part of Aldi Sud (South), owned by one of the Albrecht brothers after they split the company. Theo, the other brother, owns Aldi Nord (North) and bought Trader Joe's in the U.S. (1980s, maybe?). Other than Germany, the brothers agreed not to compete with each by opening stores in the other's territory. Operations-wise, they don't share anything in common outside of the main website, I think. Trader Joe's and ALDI USA have absolutely zero connection, operations-wise, other than their owners being brothers. I feel like TJs is a much more welcoming store with a lot of unique items that you may not find in a traditional grocer. While the prices on many things aren't terrible, they're nothing in the ballpark of ALDI, which is a different concept.

rezman
01-06-2016, 03:41 PM
I'm not too proud to shop Aldi. I'm not buying their decor. We get a lot of the main dry goods there and shop elsewhere for the meats and veggies.

Celebrator
01-06-2016, 03:56 PM
Picked up some great/unique/interesting imported European food items (chocolates, cookies, cheeses, baked goods) there before Christmas. Can't find that kind of stuff at those prices. All of it was delicious. That's the only time of the year I shop at Aldi.

Pete
01-06-2016, 05:09 PM
I was too harsh on Aldi and will give them another try and find some things to buy and try.

I was just really put off by the merchandising and even the whole front area around the cash registers looked super cheapo, especially for a newish place.


One of the big things about the boxed displays is that everything is so low to the ground, which means they make little to no use of the space above your chest. Seems incredibly wasteful. Shelving isn't expensive, after all.

https://chrisweiganddesignblog.files.wordpress.com/2014/02/aldi-1.gif

bchris02
01-06-2016, 05:28 PM
And as far as the comparisons to Trader Joe's, the reason they are completely different is b/c they are completely different companies. ALDI USA is part of Aldi Sud (South), owned by one of the Albrecht brothers after they split the company. Theo, the other brother, owns Aldi Nord (North) and bought Trader Joe's in the U.S. (1980s, maybe?). Other than Germany, the brothers agreed not to compete with each by opening stores in the other's territory. Operations-wise, they don't share anything in common outside of the main website, I think. Trader Joe's and ALDI USA have absolutely zero connection, operations-wise, other than their owners being brothers. I feel like TJs is a much more welcoming store with a lot of unique items that you may not find in a traditional grocer. While the prices on many things aren't terrible, they're nothing in the ballpark of ALDI, which is a different concept.

This.

Most people who have heard that Trader Joe's is simply a flagship Aldi don't know that they are different companies and there is a difference between Aldi Sud (Aldi USA) and Aldi Nord (Trader Joe's).

I have nothing against Aldi. There are a lot of small towns in the Midwest where they are/were pretty much the go-to grocery store, especially before Wal-Mart started building Supercenters. My family shopped at Aldi a lot when I was very young. I haven't been in one though since probably the mid 90s.

Brett
01-07-2016, 04:36 AM
Aldi is the starving college students goto grocery to stretch their dollar. Its good to see that Aldi opened a new location in Shawnee for all those OBU and St. Gregory's students.

White Peacock
01-07-2016, 07:54 AM
I'm not too proud to shop Aldi. I'm not buying their decor. We get a lot of the main dry goods there and shop elsewhere for the meats and veggies.

That's why all this whining about how OKC is so behind in the grocery game because of all these incredible grocery stores in other cities pisses me off. Only a few stores in the city are dumps. The rest are decent places to buy the same crap you're buying at some other joint that happens to be decorated like a European village. Grocery stores aren't my entertainment. I don't need to be wowed while I'm buying cereal and sausage.

Pete
01-07-2016, 08:04 AM
^

I respectfully disagree.

Other cities have Aldi's too but they also have much, much better middle-tier grocery stores and a much wider selection of specialty stores.

I simply can't find many of the things I would routinely buy at Ralph's in California (along with Vons, the big middle-tier chains) and we don't even have anything other than one Whole Foods for specialty items.

And beyond that, most the stores I have been in here are messy -- even dirty -- poorly stocked and have poor customer service.


This is all a function of being stuck with the incredibly sad Homeland chain and then being dominated by the Walmart brands.

The grocery standards in OKC are incredibly low in every respect, not just decor.


Now, things are getting better. Sprouts is a great store and is expanding here. Crest has a couple of nicer stores now but generally are below the standard in most similar-sized cities. Trader Joe's is coming, etc.

I try very hard not to be negative and when something is not up to par, try to be as fair as possible. But the grocery situation in this town is dire and well below the standard of most other cities and we should all be demanding more. It's the one place almost everyone shops multiple times a week.

jdcf
01-07-2016, 08:07 AM
I have become an Aldi's fan because of the atypical merchandise. I enjoy their different theme products, particularly the German goods. I like the odd cheeses, sausages, mustards and spreads, candy, and even the non-grocery merchandise which I have always found to be of good quality. So, I make an Aldi's run every couple of weeks to just look around and see what is new and different.

Pete
01-07-2016, 08:16 AM
BTW, to further counter the argument about store decor, I happen to be a huge fan of Costco and Winco, both of which are basically warehouses.

But, they are very well run, clean, bright, well stocked, great selection and prices and excellent customer service.

I'll give Aldi another try but my issue wasn't that it's a discount place, it just felt weird and even a bit depressing.

White Peacock
01-07-2016, 08:30 AM
...and have poor customer service.

This I'll agree with you on; horrible customer service is the scourge of Oklahoma City, almost everywhere you go.

rezman
01-07-2016, 11:01 AM
Maybe someone should start a Grocery Snobs thread to go along with the Coffee Snobs thread. :D

White Peacock
01-07-2016, 12:19 PM
Maybe someone should start a Grocery Snobs thread to go along with the Coffee Snobs thread. :D

Somebody beat you to it, and titled it "Quality Grocery Stores in OKC."

Plutonic Panda
01-07-2016, 12:28 PM
Just because you don't care about having a classy, nice, grocery store that virtually every other city has doesn't mean people who want those here are snobs.

Dubya61
01-07-2016, 02:35 PM
But here's the deal, in my opinion, OKC DOES have a (several, really) nice classy grocery stores ... just not one in your neighborhood. As I rail on in the Quality Grocery Stores in OKC thread, we're not in a food desert. Our 600 sq mile city (our 6,300 sq mile MSA), has lots of great grocery options ... and a great car culture. Hopefully, we'll get lots of really nice stuff in the denser parts developing in OKC but OKC (42 on Wikipedia's list of MSAs ranked by population) has a population density of 208 per square mile. #41 (Memphis-plus) is twice as dense (426 / sq. mi.). #43 (Louisville) is half again as dense (307 / sq. mi.). It has been mentioned many times in the various "Why don't we have a Nordstroms / Nieman Marcus / Saks" threads that OKC-ers are drivers and don't mind driving, much more so than many other metro's residents. It has been noted many times in the various "Wow! Our downtown doesn't suck, NOW" threads that our downtown is a bit of an anomaly (a shorter history than other metros, a miserable destructive period, a slow rebound, and an amazing span of recent history). Downtown willl get there. If we ever get out of bchris's perceived WalMart Full Nelson, the MSA will get there.

Pete
01-07-2016, 02:38 PM
^

While it's true OKC has some decent grocery options, it's a relatively low proportion of the total number.

It's not only downtown, there are several other areas where there is no quality store within a few miles.

Plutonic Panda
01-07-2016, 02:56 PM
But here's the deal, in my opinion, OKC DOES have a (several, really) nice classy grocery stores ... just not one in your neighborhood. As I rail on in the Quality Grocery Stores in OKC thread, we're not in a food desert. Our 600 sq mile city (our 6,300 sq mile MSA), has lots of great grocery options ... and a great car culture. Hopefully, we'll get lots of really nice stuff in the denser parts developing in OKC but OKC (42 on Wikipedia's list of MSAs ranked by population) has a population density of 208 per square mile. #41 (Memphis-plus) is twice as dense (426 / sq. mi.). #43 (Louisville) is half again as dense (307 / sq. mi.). It has been mentioned many times in the various "Why don't we have a Nordstroms / Nieman Marcus / Saks" threads that OKC-ers are drivers and don't mind driving, much more so than many other metro's residents. It has been noted many times in the various "Wow! Our downtown doesn't suck, NOW" threads that our downtown is a bit of an anomaly (a shorter history than other metros, a miserable destructive period, a slow rebound, and an amazing span of recent history). Downtown willl get there. If we ever get out of bchris's perceived WalMart Full Nelson, the MSA will get there.

Dubya, you are 100% correct there are good grocery options here in OKC. Absolutely. Whole Foods, Crest Fresh Market in SW OKC, Crest FM in Norman, Uptown Grocery... you should understand, I don't see TJ or Sprouts as a full service type grocery store. They are more specialty stores. While you can get just about everything you need at TJ's(my cousins wife in Laguna Beach shops for just about everything there food wise), I'm talking a Crest sized store.

But when you go to Dallas, or Los Angeles, or I've even noticed in St. Louis, Austin, and San Diego, grocery stores like the Crest Fresh Market are a dime a dozen there. You can't go more than two mile radius almost without running into one.

After living in L.A., I do see OKC as a food desert, but I don't expect OKC to have all of the options of a city like Los Angeles. I do except it to have the grocery scene of a city like Dallas minus the huge grocers like Central Market.

Like in Edmond, there should be at least 2-4 Tom Thumbs and/or Krogers. NW OKC should have about the same. SW OKC should have about 2-3. Norman should have about 3-4. I mean, that is already how many Homelands and Walmarts there are now. I'm not asking to walk out your front door and see a Tom Thumb. I'm asking not see any more Homelands and have about 60% of the Walmart stores in this city replaced by an upscale grocer. It works in other cities. No reason it can't work here.

TheTravellers
01-07-2016, 03:26 PM
But here's the deal, in my opinion, OKC DOES have a (several, really) nice classy grocery stores ... just not one in your neighborhood. As I rail on in the Quality Grocery Stores in OKC thread, we're not in a food desert....

Actually, yes, OKC has many areas that are food deserts:

USDA ERS - Go to the Atlas (http://www.ers.usda.gov/data-products/food-access-research-atlas/go-to-the-atlas.aspx) (zoom in to OKC)

Your use of "food desert" is probably not equivalent to the definition of "food desert" used by the USDA, though.

Uptowner
01-08-2016, 02:04 AM
It's a half dozen isles of cheap junk food. Like so one turned a family dollar upside down and shook all the food out! There's one by sprouts. Every once and awhile we get curious and wander in. I challenge you to find something in that store that's not processed. Not that processed foods are totally out of the question. But it looks like $20 could feed a 19 year old for a week. Or give a 40 year old type 2.

barrettd
01-08-2016, 07:59 AM
It's a half dozen isles of cheap junk food. Like so one turned a family dollar upside down and shook all the food out! There's one by sprouts. Every once and awhile we get curious and wander in. I challenge you to find something in that store that's not processed. Not that processed foods are totally out of the question. But it looks like $20 could feed a 19 year old for a week. Or give a 40 year old type 2.

This statement is false. It's got plenty of the same staples you find at bigger stores, as well as dairy, meat, and produce. For folks on a budget, it's a good alternative.

terryinokc
01-08-2016, 08:06 AM
It's a half dozen isles of cheap junk food. Like so one turned a family dollar upside down and shook all the food out! There's one by sprouts. Every once and awhile we get curious and wander in. I challenge you to find something in that store that's not processed. Not that processed foods are totally out of the question. But it looks like $20 could feed a 19 year old for a week. Or give a 40 year old type 2.

I have to answer this....Whatever........If you don't get it, you don't get it. It's amazing how many people shop there now...including me.
I will gladly pay just under $2 for a gallon of milk (made by Hiland), and doesn't hurt me at all to save over $2 on a package of fresh ground turkey that I use a lot. Cereal, pasta, salad and spinach, most of the canned goods, and all of their pantry staple items are great for me. I'm not a label snob...and don't accuse anyone else of that....but to get good, basic food at a great place...this is it.

This has become my first stop store....I buy all my meat except ground turkey, and vegetables at Sprouts, and fill in with everything else at Crest or Buy For Less. In my opinion...the meat at Spouts is great....and a million times better than Buy For Less or even Uptown Grocery.

Guess my summary is....like or don't like it....just like any other store. But it definitely saves me money on a lot of the items that I buy.

Just a final thought....this thread is "ALDI'S".....wonder why people add the "S" at the end of a store name that doesn't belong there?
I know people say, "Wal Mart's" and "Kroger's" or "Target's"? Never heard anyone say "Publix's" though.....LOL

trousers
01-08-2016, 08:12 AM
Dubya, you are 100% correct there are good grocery options here in OKC. Absolutely. Whole Foods, Crest Fresh Market in SW OKC, Crest FM in Norman, Uptown Grocery... you should understand, I don't see TJ or Sprouts as a full service type grocery store. They are more specialty stores. While you can get just about everything you need at TJ's(my cousins wife in Laguna Beach shops for just about everything there food wise), I'm talking a Crest sized store.

How is Sprouts a specialty store?

barrettd
01-08-2016, 08:12 AM
Just a final thought....this thread is "ALDI'S".....wonder why people add the "S" at the end of a store name that doesn't belong there?
I know people say, "Wal Mart's" and "Kroger's" or "Target's"? Never heard anyone say "Publix's" though.....LOL

My guess, in this instance, is the s was added to indicate multiple Aldis, so the apostrophe was unnecessary.

baralheia
01-08-2016, 11:06 AM
How is Sprouts a specialty store?

Sprouts would be a specialty store because of their heavy focus on natural/organic foods and (relatively) limited selection of packaged foods. When I checked them out, most of the national brands I recognize were absent from their shelves, even in the cleaning supplies and paper goods area.

Pete
01-08-2016, 11:09 AM
^

Completely agree with that assessment.

trousers
01-08-2016, 11:24 AM
I can go with that.

Hondo1
01-08-2016, 11:29 AM
Aldi is where we purchase our organics: milk, greens, fruits and vegetables. Also Aldi carries what it calls "Never Any" brand meats, as in never any additives, preservatives, growth hormones, antibiotics etc. So far, very happy with the quality, taste and price.

d-usa
01-10-2016, 11:22 AM
Aldi has a lot of non-processed options, as many others have already pointed out, so it is very possible to get healthy items there. And the processed stuff, canned foods and dry packaged stuff, isn't any more processed than the same stuff you would buy at any other store.

One random thing that I love about going to Aldi is that they look the same anywhere you go. I grew up in Germany and when I went to my first US Aldi when they opened the one near me on Penn I was amazed that everything about the store looks like I just walked into a German Aldi. Same ugly tile, same ugly lights, exact same signs. It was an amazing piece of nostalgia.

https://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/Aldigang.jpg/798px-Aldigang.jpg

mark
01-11-2016, 03:07 PM
my wife and i started going back there recently and find the organic canned beans cheaper than other stores. their sugar free popsicles are just as good as the blue bell that disappeared off shelves last year. picked up avocados in the yukon store yesterday for 29 cents each.

Mike_M
01-11-2016, 05:03 PM
My family started off with Crest/Walmart for our grocery needs until a relative suggested we check out Aldi. We too started off using it for super generic items, but as we've continued shopping there, we've converted about 90% of our grocery shopping to Aldi with a few items from Walmart or Homeland (until they build a Crest in Yukon).

As with anything, it isn't perfect for everyone, but Aldi is really great for those of us who generally cook with a lot of the same things every week. At the same time, if you look closely in the right places, you'll discover all kinds of wonderful gems and specialty items, including organic products.

zookeeper
01-11-2016, 05:07 PM
My family started off with Crest/Walmart for our grocery needs until a relative suggested we check out Aldi. We too started off using it for super generic items, but as we've continued shopping there, we've converted about 90% of our grocery shopping to Aldi with a few items from Walmart or Homeland (until they build a Crest in Yukon).

As with anything, it isn't perfect for everyone, but Aldi is really great for those of us who generally cook with a lot of the same things every week. At the same time, if you look closely in the right places, you'll discover all kinds of wonderful gems and specialty items, including organic products.

I agree. Aldi is something you figure out. Once you do, it's almost perfect.

soonermike81
01-11-2016, 07:46 PM
"Almost perfect" is probably why I don't go out of my way to shop there. Since they are considered limited assortment, we always have to make a trip somewhere else to finish our shopping. If they could expand their assortment just a little bit, we would be able to save a ton of money by shopping there. Unfortunately, their assortment is limited and sprouts and buy for less are too close to our house.

d-usa
01-12-2016, 09:26 AM
Went ahead and did a small shopping trip today to pick up stuff to cook dinner. Had to run to Target to pick up some diapers for the toddler (you gotta draw the line with Aldi somewhere...) so I ended up taking the time to walk with my receipt and compare prices since Target is where I usually shop. The only thing that was more expensive at Aldi was the shredded cheese, but it was also an 11 oz package vs the cheaper 8 oz package I would have gotten at Target so the 'per oz' cost ended up being cheaper. Comparing the Aldi brands to my usual habit of buying the Target store brand, taking 5% off with cartwheel, and taking another 5% off with the target debit card still ended up saving between $0.05 and $0.25 per item. And with the $.25 cents I paid extra for the bigger cheese I still managed to end up saving right around $1.50 for a $17.50 purchase. That might not be a bunch, but I can see where that would add up.

Pete
01-17-2016, 05:19 PM
Okay, made a return trip today...

First of all, the place was packed so that's a good sign.

I took more time and really looked through what they had. I ended up buying a bunch of random things, like chile lime cashews, fig bars ($.99!), Nutella-like spread ($1.49!) and some cinnamon raisin bread ($1.49!).

If they have any hand carts, I sure couldn't find them. Which means everyone in there absolutely has to have a cart and that makes a crowded place even more so.

The checkout is weird. I hand-carried my few items and that threw a bit of a wrench in the whole process because they merely take your items off the belt, scan them, then jam them into your cart so you can then go to the back counter and bag everything yourself. There is no place to place the items after scanning, so you'd better have a cart, which I suppose why they don't have hand carts. But how about making the lane just a little longer? Strange.

Do they offer bags for purchase? Didn't see them but didn't need them either.


The whole place is different -- much more European -- than any regular grocery stores. But that makes it somewhat confusing and jumbled. All that random household stuff takes a lot of space and just seems weird.

Still, no question they have very good prices. And, a very interesting mix of unique items, staples and brand names like soda and candy.


The whole front of the store is just too crowded. Considering the cut-price nature of their approach, self checkout lanes would be hugely welcome all the way around.

whatitis
01-17-2016, 06:11 PM
they do have bags. they are 3 or 5 cents each. they are huge bags and they are under they conveyor belt.

cferguson
01-17-2016, 09:46 PM
Aldi is a strange store until you get the hang of shopping there. One thing I like about the store is how they rarely rearrange items. Once you get the hang of where everything is located, you can get in and out of there in no time. My wife and I write shopping lists according to how you walk through the store b/c we have been there so many times and know where everything is located. The only negative is that you can only get about 90% of your items there and usually have to make another stop somewhere else. We usually buy meat and some other name brand stuff elsewhere. Prices are great and we think the food is good! Once you go a few times, it really does become a great stop.

Lately, I have started shopping at crest b/c it is right next to where I work. I like shopping there b/c i can get everything in one stop, but the store is so huge that it takes me forever to get through it.

Oh and the carts are located outside of the store. You have to put a quarter in the cart to unlock it but once you put the cart back you get the quarter back.

JohnH_in_OKC
01-18-2016, 12:36 AM
Aldi also sells reusable insulated plastic bags for about $3.00. Before entering Aldi's, I always have a quarter, my insulated bag and a heavy cloth bag. I keep my empty bags in my car's trunk. I rarely ever buy their paper or plastic bags since my bags are usually sufficient & I don't have to throw away any one time use plastic or paper bags. I also keep a Walmart insulated bag in my trunk if I need it. Also, like Sam's Club, Aldi keeps the empty boxes used by manufacturers to transport food for customers to use for bagging their purchases.

rezman
01-18-2016, 05:54 AM
One of the things I do at Aldi if I only have to pick up a few items is just grab a box off one of the shelves on my way in to throw my items in. I grab a box that is empty, or almost empty, take those items out, put my items in and take them up to the checkout. This makes it super easy as the cashier just puts my items back in the box and I just carry it out. I've noticed a few times when I went in on Saturdays that the stockers left a cart of empty boxes that they pulled by the door, so shoppers could do the same thing.