View Full Version : Homeland Grocery Stores



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MikeOKC
05-18-2011, 02:40 PM
4/29/15

Homeland continues to shrink it's presence in the Oklahoma City area, with plans to close their location on N. May just north of NW 122nd on May 30th.

Just last month, the chain converted their location at NW 23rd and Council to a bare bones concept called Cost Saver. In October of last year, they closed their highly visible location at Northwest Expressway and MacArthur. They also closed a long-standing location at NW 39th & Penn in 2012.


http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/homeland043015b.jpg

The changes come as the Edmond-based company faces increasing pressure from competitors such as Sprouts, Whole Foods, Natural Grocers (http://www.okctalk.com/showwiki.php?title=Natural+Grocers) and others. Also, local grocer Crest has been on somewhat of an aggressive expansion track.

In addition, Walmart continues to open more Super Centers and Neighborhood Markets and giant WinCo Foods (http://www.okctalk.com/showwiki.php?title=WinCo)is set to hit the market in the near future with four huge locations in the area.

Homeland is what grocery industry analysts call “middle market”, a segment that is being squeezed at one end by the deep discounters and at the other by specialty stores such as Whole Foods and Uptown Market.


http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/homeland043015.jpg

Homeland was formed in 1987 when local investors bought out the state's Safeway stores which had previously been the dominant grocery vendor in the area. Since that time they have experience many ups and downs including bankruptcy. Currently, the company operates approximately 80 stores in Oklahoma, Kansas and Georgia, most of which are located in smaller communities.

The vacated space at NW 122nd and May will be put of for lease by the landlord once the grocery vacates.

BillyOcean
05-18-2011, 04:25 PM
I'm not really sure how Homeland stays in business. The stores are almost always empty when I go in them (rarely ever go there and only if I need just one or two things). I will admit the one you are referencing is pretty nice, but I couldn't speak for the rest of them, as I live really close to this one.

MikeOKC
05-18-2011, 05:25 PM
I'm not really sure how Homeland stays in business. The stores are almost always empty when I go in them (rarely ever go there and only if I need just one or two things). I will admit the one you are referencing is pretty nice, but I couldn't speak for the rest of them, as I live really close to this one.

I can't speak to any of them but May and Britton and it's always busy. Is that the one you wonder how it stays in business? I do wonder about some of the others and hope they really do put some money into the other stores and bring them up-to-date.

Thunder
05-18-2011, 08:17 PM
Can you try to take some pictures and show us?

onthestrip
05-18-2011, 09:04 PM
This is what competition does. Glad to finally see some forward thinking by local grocers.

ljbab728
05-19-2011, 12:30 AM
I regularly shop at the Homeland at NW Expressway and MacArthur which is always busy. It's not being remodeled but they are completely rearranging the stock in the store and they are giving a much larger section for organic food. I walk right by the organic food section anyway but I'm sure it's welcomed by many and presents better choices.

the_Mont
05-19-2011, 08:32 AM
The Homeland at May and Britton is my preferred grocery store. I stopped in this week, and the remodeled produce and deli section looks incredible. They even included an organic freezer and dry goods section. Love the new look.

Patrick
05-19-2011, 11:37 AM
That store is so nice because it's fairly new. Albertson's didn't build it too long ago, and Homeland just happened to inherit a new store. So, not sure we can credit Homeland with its overall appearance.

Joe Kimball
05-19-2011, 12:38 PM
That store is so nice because it's fairly new. Albertson's didn't build it too long ago, and Homeland just happened to inherit a new store. So, not sure we can credit Homeland with its overall appearance.

Right, it was like that when Albertson's owned it, if not a tad better than it is today.

The selection of odd items is often advantageous at Homeland, but the prices usually STINK. I see items that are regularly half again as much as the same item at Crest, if not TWICE as much.

metro
05-19-2011, 01:53 PM
I agree, it's one of OKC's nicest grocery stores, but we still have a long ways to go. Too bad the Homeland at 18th and Classen next to Heritage Hills, Mesta Park, and Downtown is so dumpy.

asta2
05-19-2011, 04:08 PM
I stopped in the other day and was very impressed as well with the upgrades. I was not impressed with the prices however. It really seemed that everything was more expensive. I need to do some real price checking and see if it was my imagination.

Pete
05-19-2011, 05:50 PM
I don't understand how any large grocery chain would tolerate "dumpy" stores, regardless of location.

The two big chains out here are Ralph's and Von's and while some are more upscale than others, they are in lots of poorer areas of Southern California and every single one of those stores are clean and bright.

I'm sure glad OKC is getting some new players because Homeland in particular seems to be a very badly run organization and quality competition will either force change or close them down.

Larry OKC
05-20-2011, 01:10 AM
I stopped in the other day and was very impressed as well with the upgrades. I was not impressed with the prices however. It really seemed that everything was more expensive. I need to do some real price checking and see if it was my imagination.

Have to pay for the upgrades somehow....

MikeOKC
05-20-2011, 01:59 AM
Here's how to play the Homeland game.... Go in with the discipline to buy only their loss leaders which are often the best deals in town. Everything else is high. But, it's a nice store and I sure feel better shopping there than I do at a lot of places. We buy loss leaders (big discounted advertised items) at Homeland and everything else at Buy For Less. We DO buy all of our prescriptions at the May & Britton Homeland. The pharmacy is the least expensive in OKC and they will match any lower price found in town. That's a no-brainer decision for us. My wife had a situation where something seemed high and the pharmacy tech actually called several different pharmacies to find a lower price and they matched it plus some. It helps that they are all very friendly at that pharmacy. But on regular priced food items? I agree that Homeland is usually higher than anywhere else. We do all our other grocery shopping (or "marketing" as my grandmother used to call it) at Buy For Less on the NWX just east of Portland. Easy walk from Founders Tower for those quick forgotten items and it's also a nice store.

jdcf
05-20-2011, 10:55 AM
We also use the pharmacy at this Homeland, and the staff is very good to us. We don't generally shop here because it seems that our pharmacy runs are made in conjunction with something else and we do not go directly home.

We were recently in the Homeland at May and 122nd. I thought it was a dump and won't go back.

I continue to hear good things about But for Less on Northwest Highway. I will have to give it a try; I always thought is was dirty too.

Larry OKC
05-21-2011, 05:03 AM
if you consider the May & 122nd a dump what would you call some of there other locations (like 36th & Penn)?

May want to hold off on the visit to Buy 4 Less, right now they are rearranging the store and stuff is strewn everywhere. I haven't ever seen a problem with cleanliness. Although I will say, because of the gray painted ceiling, it always feels like a thunderstorm is going to break out at any minute...rush in and out so you don't get wet. To be fair, it wasn't Buy 4 Less' doing (Baker's painted it and B4L just didn't bother changing it). Also, the isles are mostly "warehouse" style (stock stacked to the ceiling) which can contribute to a closed in/dark/dirty appearance I suppose.

bluedogok
05-21-2011, 08:03 AM
I lived near NW 50th & Independence before moving to Austin so I frequented the Buy 4 Less at NW Expressway & Portland quite a bit and never found it to be dirty unlike the one at NW 36th & MacArthur. It is a nicer store due to it being built as a "nicer store" by the Baker's group than most of the other locations. The epitome of the "warehouse style grocery" to me was always the Food 4 Less at NW 122nd & Penn, it was open rack, cut boxes and always dark inside there with the galvanized deck and red oxide coated structure. I know when doing open deck designs where we are trying to get an "airy, light feel" I always try and get the metal deck/structure painted white or at a minimum use the gray primer structure instead of the red oxide structure.

Larry OKC
05-22-2011, 01:22 AM
Know it was something before Baker's but can't recall who it was (Baker's painted the ceiling gray). Loved it when Buy 4 Less took its place and they had the Baker's price next to the Buy 4 Less price on the shelves for everything. Significant savings.

MikeOKC
05-22-2011, 02:18 AM
Know it was something before Baker's but can't recall who it was (Baker's painted the ceiling gray). Loved it when Buy 4 Less took its place and they had the Baker's price next to the Buy 4 Less price on the shelves for everything. Significant savings.

It was a MegaMarket.

ms7168
05-22-2011, 03:22 PM
Fleming Foods experimented with having stores and they called them MegaMarket. I liked them and was sad when they sold them to Bakers as the prices went way up immediately. It's better now that it's Buy For Less. My Parents stayed with me for a few weeks and Mom noticed then that the grocery stores in Oklahoma City were awful.
She liked that Buy For Less the best. It's close to me since I live just southwest of it a little bit.

Brett
05-22-2011, 04:13 PM
It doesn't seem logical for Homeland to sink a bunch of money in upgrading the interior of the May & Britton store when in about 5 months Whole Foods and Sunflower Farmers Market will open and will steal away Homeland's customers.

bluedogok
05-22-2011, 04:20 PM
It doesn't seem logical for Homeland to sink a bunch of money in upgrading the interior of the May & Britton store when in about 5 months Whole Foods and Sunshine Farmer's Market will open and will steal away Homeland's customers.
I don't know of anyone who shops at Whole Foods, Sunflower, Central Market or Sprouts exclusively. Even the ones who live in/near Downtown Austin may shop at that Whole Foods quite often but they will make a less frequent trip to HEB or a Wal-Mart/Target Supercenter than they did when they lived in the burbs.

ljbab728
05-22-2011, 11:34 PM
It doesn't seem logical for Homeland to sink a bunch of money in upgrading the interior of the May & Britton store when in about 5 months Whole Foods and Sunflower Farmers Market will open and will steal away Homeland's customers.

Keep in mind that some people may prefer to save a little money and aren't that interested in organic foods, which are always higher, or having 100 varieties of cheese. I believe Homeland will survive the onslaught. I'm sure that Whole Foods and Sunflower will have a willing market but it's unlikely they will be putting any local stores out of business. If they do indeed prod the locals into upgrades, it's a good thing though.

Larry OKC
05-23-2011, 12:52 AM
It was a MegaMarket.

DING DING DING DING

Thats it!

the_Mont
05-24-2011, 09:57 AM
My mom used to take my brother and I to the Buy for Less every other Monday after school for grocery shopping when we were younger. I might have to get some groceries there soon, just to experience some nostalgia.

phinzup
06-19-2011, 01:50 PM
DING DING DING DING

Thats it!

It was a Mega Market ran by the Beachler's group...

Let's be honest here, the true Whole Foods shopper, isn't a Homeland shopper. They might shop at a Homeland today but only because it's handy, but when the Whole Foods opens they won't be back no matter how much Homeland expands their "organic/natural" goods sections.

MikeOKC
06-19-2011, 05:59 PM
It was a Mega Market ran by the Beachler's group...

Let's be honest here, the true Whole Foods shopper, isn't a Homeland shopper. They might shop at a Homeland today but only because it's handy, but when the Whole Foods opens they won't be back no matter how much Homeland expands their "organic/natural" goods sections.

La Te Da.....How about a definition of a "true Whole Foods shopper"? Do they worship in the veggie section on Sunday morning? Swap blood while in line at the registers? Make a vow to stay away from those lowly stores of yesteryear - at the risk of being caught for disloyalty by the "True Whole Foods Shopping Police"? This post sounds like hipster snobbery that I would expect from people in Seattle, Portland or Burlington, VT. Are they "too good" for Homeland once the Holy Grail of food opens? Your post is almost creepy and cultish.

Ugh.

phinzup
06-19-2011, 06:40 PM
La Te Da.....How about a definition of a "true Whole Foods shopper"? Do they worship in the veggie section on Sunday morning? Swap blood while in line at the registers? Make a vow to stay away from those lowly stores of yesteryear - at the risk of being caught for disloyalty by the "True Whole Foods Shopping Police"? This post sounds like hipster snobbery that I would expect from people in Seattle, Portland or Burlington, VT. Are they "too good" for Homeland once the Holy Grail of food opens? Your post is almost creepy and cultish.

Ugh.

Whatever......you sure have assumed a lot from my post. No need to explain my thoughts further, you wouldn't get it anyway.

MikeOKC
06-19-2011, 06:53 PM
Whatever......you sure have assumed a lot from my post. No need to explain my thoughts further, you wouldn't get it anyway.

I wouldn't "get it" anyway? You took quite the high-brow potshot at Homeland in elevating Whole Foods. I think I touched a nerve with the Seattle/Portland thing. It's a cultural thing. But please - go ahead - forget what I wrote. I might have just misinterpreted you. Tell us why a "true" Whole Foods shopper would never shop at Homeland again, no matter what Homeland did. I might be hipper than you think.:Smiley078

onthestrip
06-19-2011, 09:15 PM
La Te Da.....How about a definition of a "true Whole Foods shopper"? Do they worship in the veggie section on Sunday morning? Swap blood while in line at the registers? Make a vow to stay away from those lowly stores of yesteryear - at the risk of being caught for disloyalty by the "True Whole Foods Shopping Police"? This post sounds like hipster snobbery that I would expect from people in Seattle, Portland or Burlington, VT. Are they "too good" for Homeland once the Holy Grail of food opens? Your post is almost creepy and cultish.

Ugh.

LOL. Funny post of the day

ljbab728
06-19-2011, 11:19 PM
If there is such a thing as a "true Whole Foods shopper" it has to be someone who isn't concerned about cost. I'm sure that category exists in OKC but, for most of the population, Whole Foods won't be a one-stop shopping location.

bluedogok
06-20-2011, 07:01 PM
If there is such a thing as a "true Whole Foods shopper" it has to be someone who isn't concerned about cost. I'm sure that category exists in OKC but, for most of the population, Whole Foods won't be a one-stop shopping location.
It is n't for most here in Austin, most of the "dedicated Whole Foods shoppers" that I know still go to HEB for many items. They may not go as often but they still shop there.

Dustin
05-02-2012, 08:59 PM
http://newsok.com/new-greenhouse-to-be-built-to-supply-homeland-with-fresh-produce/article/3671790

A New York company has agreed to build a large greenhouse dedicated to supplying Homeland grocery stores with fresh produce through a unique partnership announced Tuesday.


BrightFarms, based in New York, will finance, build and operate the greenhouse at the Homeland store at N May Avenue and Britton Road at an estimated cost of $1.5 million to $2 million. In exchange, the grocer has signed a long-term purchase agreement to buy products grown inside the greenhouse.

Kate Siskel, a BrightFarms spokeswoman, said groundbreaking is planned for July and the greenhouse is expected to be operational later this year. The company focuses on growing lettuces, tomatoes and herbs because those products are the most perishable and suffer the most from being transported.

Produce in the greenhouse will be grown for taste, not shelf life. It will be picked when ripe or ready and arrive on store shelves within 24 hours.

The greenhouse will cover at least an acre and be capable of producing up to 150,000 pounds of produce per year, including spring mix, arugula, spinach, cherry and hothouse tomatoes — enough to supply that store and up to eight others.

“We're excited to partner with BrightFarms and offer our consumers a year-round supply of fresh local produce. This partnership supports our commitment to sell the absolute freshest produce and our commitment to the community,” said Darryl Fitzgerald, chief executive officer of Homeland Stores, an Oklahoma City based grocery store chain with 75 stores in Oklahoma and Kansas.

It's the second long-term produce agreement BrightFarms has made with a grocery chain. The first was with McCaffrey's, an east coast grocer with three locations in Pennsylvania and New Jersey. BrightFarms also operates a smaller, noncommercial greenhouse in New York.

Siskel said traditionally, the long-term agreements are for at least 10 years. She declined to discuss the specific terms of the deal with Homeland.

CuatrodeMayo
05-02-2012, 10:01 PM
Nice to see Homeland taking a step in that direction.

mcca7596
05-02-2012, 10:25 PM
This rendering actually looks like an urban building; that's awesome!

http://cdn2.newsok.biz/cache/r620-46fec6430e85c526a6d8c3d3fbda4850.jpg

blangtang
05-07-2012, 11:42 PM
I noticed tonight the Homeland grocery store on 39th and Penn had the Homeland sign removed. The lights on the inside were on around 730pm. no cars in the parking lot. I hadn't been by that location in a couple of months...

Anyone know if this a recent closure or is undergoing a remodel ?

Soonerman
05-08-2012, 12:31 AM
I believe another grocery store is going in there.

redrunner
05-08-2012, 09:05 AM
I was told it's reopening as a Super Saver store which will still be owned by Homeland. I did a quick google search and found this.


the store will be closing in 2, 3 weeks and re-open on May 5th as Super Saver Club; no coupon,all store brand product,with local vendor /produce the cashier said it is like a ghetto version of sunflower market

Link (http://www.afullcup.com/forums/homeland/598347-nw39th-penn-homeland-supersaver-club-may-5th.html)

adaniel
05-08-2012, 11:27 AM
I was told it's reopening as a Super Saver store which will still be owned by Homeland. I did a quick google search and found this.



Link (http://www.afullcup.com/forums/homeland/598347-nw39th-penn-homeland-supersaver-club-may-5th.html)

Even a "ghetto" version of Sunflower Market would be an improvement.

JohnH_in_OKC
05-08-2012, 09:14 PM
Since there is no Aldi's in the neighborhood, if Homeland can replicate Aldi's products & pricing, I'll be a regular customer.

Dustin
06-24-2012, 12:00 AM
Bumpity bump bump.

New expected opening is 2013.

http://brightfarms.com/projects/homeland-stores

Bill Robertson
06-25-2012, 07:34 AM
That time frame sounds more realistic.

Glad to see Homeland moving in positive directions. Especially since my wife works for them.

Pete
01-06-2014, 05:12 PM
This store was bought about six months ago by 4D construction out of El Reno.

Recently, the took out building permits to split the building into two separate spaces, one taking about 2/3rds of the space and the other the remainder.

Goodwill will be taking one of the spaces; not sure about the other.

Mr. Cotter
01-06-2014, 05:16 PM
ugh...

trousers
01-06-2014, 08:43 PM
This is just...well, disappointing.

bchris02
01-06-2014, 09:34 PM
It may be difficult to find another grocery store to fill that location being that the Belle Isle Wal-Mart is so close. I think Target isn't far from their either, though its a little farther than Wal-Mart. With the new Sam's Club the area is probably as saturated as it can get with grocers. I wonder what the other tenant will be.

Soonerman
01-06-2014, 09:59 PM
Isn't the Target on May a P-fresh store?

mugofbeer
01-06-2014, 10:38 PM
This store was bought about six months ago by 4D construction out of El Reno.

Recently, the took out building permits to split the building into two separate spaces, one taking about 2/3rds of the space and the other the remainder.

Goodwill will be taking one of the spaces; not sure about the other.

Its like a neighborhood scratching and clawing to stay nice and respectable - then someone decides to paint their house orange,

MWCGuy
01-07-2014, 02:07 AM
Goodwill has been buying up a lot of real estate lately. It seems like their stores or collection centers are popping up everywhere like Starbucks did before fast food and convenience stores jumped in the specialty coffee market. Makes me wonder where their focus is (helping people or making money).

DoctorTaco
01-07-2014, 07:39 AM
Goodwill has been buying up a lot of real estate lately. It seems like their stores or collection centers are popping up everywhere like Starbucks did before fast food and convenience stores jumped in the specialty coffee market. Makes me wonder where their focus is (helping people or making money).

Why are these goals mutually exclusive? The more money Goodwill makes the more people it employs/helps/retrains, no?

And honestly Goodwill is not a terrible use for the space. I've actually been really frustrated moving to OKC that there are a dearth of thrift stores. Back on the west coast, where I relocated from, we had them everywhere. Not in the most affluent neighborhoods, but not segregated to the ghettos either. In fact, in some towns, the Goodwills/St. Vincent de Paul thrift stores would sort out their higher end clothes from their donations and sell them in small "boutiques" downtown, adjacent to higher-end retail.

Pete
01-07-2014, 10:19 AM
As a reminder, Goodwill did not buy this property; they are only renting part of it.

Mr. Cotter
01-07-2014, 10:55 AM
5793

Pete
01-07-2014, 11:22 AM
It must be said this is a setback for those who were hoping that this would be become a proper district centered around the gay community.

I know Ed Shadid has been stumping for this but the whole stretch is still pretty ratty and industrial looking.

Trading a grocery store for a Goodwill won't help, nor will the closing of Coits.

Larry OKC
01-07-2014, 04:26 PM
maybe an Aldi could take over the remaining space?

MWCGuy
01-08-2014, 01:24 AM
Goodwill will not do anything meaningful with the property. The former Buchanan's at 89th and Penn is an empty parking lot on most days. Half the building is a junkpile inside with litter all over the place. The other half is a thrift store that is lucky if it does Dollar General traffic volume. The parking lot will do great as for sale by owner drop off lot.

icecold
01-10-2014, 01:48 PM
Goodwill will not do anything meaningful with the property. .

Goodwill does not own the property. The property will be upgraded nicely.

Pete
01-10-2014, 01:59 PM
Goodwill does not own the property. The property will be upgraded nicely.

Do you know any of the specifics about the redevelopment?

metro
01-12-2014, 10:00 AM
It may be difficult to find another grocery store to fill that location being that the Belle Isle Wal-Mart is so close. I think Target isn't far from their either, though its a little farther than Wal-Mart. With the new Sam's Club the area is probably as saturated as it can get with grocers. I wonder what the other tenant will be.

Not to mention after Homeland pulled out, it flipped crappy grocery store concepts twice with no luck, and a 3rd never opened. Better something here than nothing.

soonerguru
01-12-2014, 10:47 AM
5793

Wait. Ed Shadid said that gentrification is bad. We cannot have neighborhood improvement.

zookeeper
01-12-2014, 12:15 PM
Why the problem with the Goodwill thrift store? I guess you either love or hate these kinds of stores. The thing about Goodwill is this is their way of raising money to pay the handicapped workers in industrial work that they bid on right along with other companies. The training and jobs they offer at these manufacturing facilities are wonderful! They couldn't do that without the thrift store revenue.