View Full Version : KD Describes Suburban Isolation



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soonerguru
10-27-2013, 10:52 PM
KD is interviewed in the Oklahoman. One of the questions relates to his decision to move Downtown.

THE OKLAHOMAN: One thing we haven't talked to you about is your decisions with real estate. You've purchased some property in the area and sold another. Is there anything you can tell us about what that all means?

KD: I mean, nothing really. Nothing, to be honest. Like I said, I'm always moving so I guess I like the feel of it being new I guess. But every time I move it was about location, how close it is to the gym, how close it is to the practice facility, how big the house is. And with my mom and my brother starting to move out of the house I started to downsize a little bit and get something a little bit more homey just for myself. But living in almost every part of the city I feel like has helped me get more acquainted with the people, directions and just seeing parts of the city I never thought I would be around. So living downtown now is quite an experience because I see so many people and see so many different things. I don't feel secluded. When I was living out in Edmond, in the Gaillardia area, I felt so far away from the people. But now I feel right in the mix so it feels cool.

We all thought it was crazy that Thunder players were moving into Gaillardia. I wonder how many of them still live there.

Just the facts
10-28-2013, 06:14 AM
I saw that yesterday and posted it in the New Urban Library thread for safe keeping.

Urbanized
10-28-2013, 07:08 AM
I don't see how the move could be anything but good for OKC. The less apart he feels from OKC and its people the better the chances of another free agent deal.

OKCRT
10-28-2013, 07:40 AM
I don't see how the move could be anything but good for OKC. The less apart he feels from OKC and its people the better the chances of another free agent deal.

I wonder where momma is moving too?

Bellaboo
10-28-2013, 08:04 AM
I wonder where momma is moving too?

Maryland.

Spartan
10-28-2013, 08:10 AM
They are DC natives.

dankrutka
10-28-2013, 08:20 AM
I wonder where momma is moving too?

Yeah, but they're here a lot. I would guess his mom and brother have a place of their own instead of staying at his place or a hotel.

MadMonk
10-28-2013, 09:13 AM
I just ran into a couple of Thunder players at a shop on Memorial this weekend. They aren't difficult to spot. :D

Some people seek the sort of peace and quiet that comes with suburban living but, I can understand that in his line of work being closer to the downtown area would be beneficial.

SoonerDave
10-28-2013, 09:38 AM
I just ran into a couple of Thunder players at a shop on Memorial this weekend. They aren't difficult to spot. :D

Some people seek the sort of peace and quiet that comes with suburban living but, I can understand that in his line of work being closer to the downtown area would be beneficial.

Love that we have the choice.

Geographer
10-28-2013, 09:42 AM
Suck it, Suburbia.

Pete
10-28-2013, 09:51 AM
I bet you'll see him a lot at his new restaurant which should be opening soon.

bradh
10-28-2013, 10:46 AM
Suck it, Suburbia.

burn?

td25er
10-28-2013, 11:37 AM
Suck it, Suburbia.

Jealous that Edmond has more successful people (per capita) than anywhere except for Nichols Hills?

Bellaboo
10-28-2013, 11:42 AM
Where suburbia rules is in the schools.....

adaniel
10-28-2013, 11:57 AM
Jealous that Edmond has more fake credit card millionaires (per capita) than anywhere except for Nichols Hills?

Fixed. And no I am not jealous.

Just the facts
10-28-2013, 12:05 PM
Where suburbia rules is in the schools.....

But that is only temporary. Todays great suburban schools are the next generation's nightmare schools. I am also not sure how great suburban schools even are. Have you seen how poorly America ranks in global tests? Maybe if we spent more on teachers and materials and less on building entire new school districts every 20 to 30 years we could get more bang for our buck.

bradh
10-28-2013, 12:14 PM
Todays great suburban schools are the next generation's nightmare schools.

That's a farce. Maybe in some places, but in Texas, and where I grew up, the schools have stayed tops in the state. There are some 70s/80s suburbia areas that are just now getting their schools back up to snuff, but that's because energy companies have moved their offices close to these areas.

betts
10-28-2013, 12:35 PM
You get out of schools what you put into them. And genetics plays a role as well. I've seen brilliant students from inner city schools, 7 student graduating classes and The Sticks, Oklahoma. And I've seen poor students from Casady and Heritage Hall. Parental involvement is an important factor as well.

There's no special selection process for teachers that determine who is going to be a good teacher and who is not. Inner city schools have good and bad teachers, as do the suburbs. So if the gene pool and parental involvement at schools in the suburbs shifts, they will no longer be considered good schools. The reverse holds true as well. That's why some people in Heritage Hills are now sending their kids to Wilson instead of private school.

MadMonk
10-28-2013, 12:36 PM
Suck it, Suburbia.
Exactly the type of response that makes people despise neo-urbanists.

Urbanized
10-28-2013, 12:43 PM
I suspect that was tongue-in-cheek.

jerrywall
10-28-2013, 12:56 PM
Even if it was, there are plenty of folks (including those on here) who feel like they should be able to tell people where and how to live, and are down right angry that some folks choose not to live downtown.

betts
10-28-2013, 02:17 PM
There's not room enough downtown. I think most people's complaints about suburbia reflect concerns about sprawl, the cost of maintaining roads, and the "throw-away" attitude towards older housing it sometimes generates. I worry about all the poisons people put on their lawns to make them green and weed-free, the fact that they kill beneficial insects and get into our water supply, and the lawns drink up a lot of water. But I don't think everyone needs to live in a high-rise or give up their car (it doesn't hurt any of us to walk more though).

Plutonic Panda
10-28-2013, 06:00 PM
Because a basketball player says he felt isolated somehow that points to isolation in suburbia? That's funny. Anyhow, I'm glad that KD is happy and it is good that we have great choices.

Plutonic Panda
10-28-2013, 06:03 PM
Yes, I am jealous that Edmond has tons of multi millionaires who are more successful than I will ever beFixed it for you. Anyone can change someone's post to reflect your agenda. Meanwhile in the real world, Edmond is a great suburb and tons of successful people here who do great good for investing in downtown and adding to OKC's sales tax. The Gold Dome is just one example.

Geographer
10-28-2013, 06:07 PM
Obviously it's just tongue-in-cheek, relax people

Plutonic Panda
10-28-2013, 06:09 PM
But that is only temporary. Todays great suburban schools are the next generation's nightmare schools. I am also not sure how great suburban schools even are. Have you seen how poorly America ranks in global tests? Maybe if we spent more on teachers and materials and less on building entire new school districts every 20 to 30 years we could get more bang for our buck.It's nice to know that virtually ever answer I will ever get from you will be, "it's the fault of suburban sprawl".

Just the facts
10-28-2013, 08:56 PM
It's nice to know that virtually ever answer I will ever get from you will be, "it's the fault of suburban sprawl".

If nothing else, I'm consistent. :)

VGJt_YXIoJI

Teo9969
10-28-2013, 11:12 PM
It's nice to know that virtually ever answer I will ever get from you will be, "it's the fault of suburban sprawl".

To be fair to JTF, he's not against suburbs…he's against the development style of suburbs…He doesn't have a problem with *suburban* sprawl, but with suburban *sprawl*.

Plutonic Panda
10-29-2013, 01:56 AM
That argument makes no sense. I'll post a new thread showing the suburbs I think are fine. I just don't understand how you can't sprawl out being suburban.

Just the facts
10-29-2013, 06:55 AM
To be fair to JTF, he's not against suburbs…he's against the development style of suburbs…He doesn't have a problem with *suburban* sprawl, but with suburban *sprawl*.

Thanks. I don't know why that is hard to understand. On the Rural to Urban Transect T3 is Suburban and it is the 'suburban' most people like. It is the 'suburban' image the marketing people try to instill in the buyer (a great hometown and all the jazz). It is the 'suburban' image the real-estate agent sell you on (location, location, location) - but yet, the builder never delivers in reality, which is why people move every 6 years. If the builder actually built what the marketing people and real-estate agent were selling you then you could live and work in the same neighborhood forever (age in place) - but they don't.

Take Carlton Landing as an example. You can't get more suburban than that - yet it is a real town complete with a waterfront, civic building, and a commercial district with high density housing that decreases in density to the natural fringe. People can live anywhere in the transect they want - and do it all without a car because even from the most remote low density house it is only a 5 minute walk to the store.

All the current 'suburbs' builders build are single use pods with disconnect dendritic street grids that even if you live 50 feet from a store, you have to drive a mile to get to it. And of course, the dendritic street network forces all cars to have to use the same road with no alternative for traffic flow which ensures that congestion will be present.

For those interested in the T-3 suburban zone here are some pictures and design characteristics.

Transect Collection | T-3 SUB-URBAN (http://transect-collection.org/p1028823350)

LandRunOkie
10-29-2013, 09:11 AM
Yes, I am jealous that Edmond has tons of multi millionaires who are more successful than I will ever be

Fixed it for you. Anyone can change someone's post to reflect your agenda. Meanwhile in the real world, Edmond is a great suburb and tons of successful people here who do great good for investing in downtown and adding to OKC's sales tax. The Gold Dome is just one example.
Now that's not very platonic of you...

warreng88
10-29-2013, 12:34 PM
I have a few friends who live in north Edmond. One of them to me, really epitomizes the suburban lifestyle. He has two daughters, works 8-5, has a van, a brand new house with a yard in a nice area where his kids can play outside. They very rarely go out and do much of anything and when they do, it is a date night on a Friday when they can get a babysitter.

The other friend is married and has one kid. He and his wife constantly complain that nothing is close to them, the roads are all torn up or in bad shape and they just want to see it fixed. This friend is the problem I have with suburbia. He moved to north Edmond knowing where DT/DD/BT/Midtown was and what it had to offer, but he decides to move a good 20-30 minute drive away from that and then complain that nothing is near him. There aren't any restaurants, shops, activities in the near area and the best way for them to get to work downtown is on Portland/Hefner Parkway, which is scheduled to be widened, but not for another five or so years.

Again, I have no problem with the suburbs if you know what you are getting into but if you move up there just for the schools (which is what it sounds like from my friends and this board) and expect everything to change because you moved up there, then don't complain when things don't change and you are stuck with a house out of your price range and a 30 minute drive to get a good burger.

Just the facts
10-29-2013, 12:45 PM
The other friend is married and has one kid. He and his wife constantly complain that nothing is close to them, the roads are all torn up or in bad shape and they just want to see it fixed. This friend is the problem I have with suburbia. He moved to north Edmond knowing where DT/DD/BT/Midtown was and what it had to offer, but he decides to move a good 20-30 minute drive away from that and then complain that nothing is near him. There aren't any restaurants, shops, activities in the near area and the best way for them to get to work downtown is on Portland/Hefner Parkway, which is scheduled to be widened, but not for another five or so years.

This is the 'drive till you qualify' trap. I wish this website was available back when I was looking for a house. It show housing affordability with transportation cost factored in.

Welcome to The H+T Affordability Index (http://www.htaindex.org/)

warreng88
10-29-2013, 12:57 PM
This is the 'drive till you qualify' trap. I wish this website was available back when I was looking for a house. It show housing affordability with transportation cost factored in.

Welcome to The H+T Affordability Index (http://www.htaindex.org/)

That's interesting. I clicked on my neightborhood and the block group was 45.85% in H&T costs % income and it was 18.44% is housing costs % income. When I clicked on my friend's neighborhood, it was 72.29% H&T and 41.44% Housing % cost and 78.59% and 46.31% for the same figures. My house is worth less than half of their houses but I am 10 minutes from downtown and they are 30 minutes from downtown which means they will use a lot more gas to get to the same places I can get to for a lot less. Thanks for the website link.

jerrywall
10-29-2013, 01:11 PM
That's interesting. I clicked on my neightborhood and the block group was 45.85% in H&T costs % income and it was 18.44% is housing costs % income. When I clicked on my friend's neighborhood, it was 72.29% H&T and 41.44% Housing % cost and 78.59% and 46.31% for the same figures. My house is worth less than half of their houses but I am 10 minutes from downtown and they are 30 minutes from downtown which means they will use a lot more gas to get to the same places I can get to for a lot less. Thanks for the website link.

The trouble with all that is, it assumes everyone wants to get to the same place, or works in the same areas. If you live downtown, yet your work is in the office complexes behind Quail Springs Mall, then how does all that work out?

Just the facts
10-29-2013, 01:17 PM
The trouble with all that is, it assumes everyone wants to get to the same place, or works in the same areas. If you live downtown, yet your work is in the office complexes behind Quail Springs Mall, then how does all that work out?

The algorithm is a little more complicated than that and of course, it is an average for the block group. Some people are above average and some people are below average. For example - it calculates the distance to the nearest grocery store - not as the crow flies, but as the car drives. Suburbia ranks poorly in this category because even when the grocery store is 50 feet from someone's house that have to drive a mile round trip to get to it because of the street network. Retention ponds, landscape buffers, and fences prevent people who can throw a rock and hit their local diner from walking to it.

warreng88
10-29-2013, 01:22 PM
The algorithm is a little more complicated than that and of course, it is an average for the block group. Some people are above average and some people are below average.

That's what I was going to say. My cousin lives on 150th and Western and two years ago, he worked downtown. He has since moved to working two miles from his house. All of my other friends I mentioned in the previous post live in North Edmond and work either downtown or around 63rd and Broadway area. I don't know anybody who lives near downtown and work in the Edmond area. I'm sure there are those people out there, but I don't know any of them.

adaniel
10-29-2013, 01:30 PM
Fixed it for you. Anyone can change someone's post to reflect your agenda. Meanwhile in the real world, Edmond is a great suburb and tons of successful people here who do great good for investing in downtown and adding to OKC's sales tax. The Gold Dome is just one example.

My post was mocking the ridiculous notion that only successful people live in Edmond and had nothing to do with who supports downtown. Lots of people throughout the metro bust their hump and have made themselves very well off, not just Edmond. Nice try though.



The other friend is married and has one kid. He and his wife constantly complain that nothing is close to them, the roads are all torn up or in bad shape and they just want to see it fixed. This friend is the problem I have with suburbia. He moved to north Edmond knowing where DT/DD/BT/Midtown was and what it had to offer, but he decides to move a good 20-30 minute drive away from that and then complain that nothing is near him. There aren't any restaurants, shops, activities in the near area and the best way for them to get to work downtown is on Portland/Hefner Parkway, which is scheduled to be widened, but not for another five or so years.

Again, I have no problem with the suburbs if you know what you are getting into but if you move up there just for the schools (which is what it sounds like from my friends and this board) and expect everything to change because you moved up there, then don't complain when things don't change and you are stuck with a house out of your price range and a 30 minute drive to get a good burger.

In their defense, I think the majority of people understand what they are getting themselves into when they move to the suburbs. Most people are mature enough to understand that they may be giving up some of some of the thing they enjoy in the city for a bigger house, better schools, etc. Of course you do have people like your friend who frankly want their cake and to eat it to.

I especially don't get people who do not have to worry about school districts but then complain about how bored they are and things here are too focused downtown, blah blah blah. At the end of the day its your choice where to live, and you need to be okay with the trade offs no matter where you go.

Just the facts
10-29-2013, 01:37 PM
In their defense, I think the majority of people understand what they are getting themselves into when they move to the suburbs. Most people are mature enough to understand that they may be giving up some of some of the thing they enjoy in the city for a bigger house, better schools, etc. Of course you do have people like your friend who frankly want their cake and to eat it to.

I especially don't get people who do not have to worry about school districts but then complain about how bored they are and things here are too focused downtown, blah blah blah. At the end of the day its your choice where to live, and you need to be okay with the trade offs no matter where you go.

I am not sure most people do know what they are getting into. When we bought our suburban house gasoline was $1.30 per gallon. If someone told me gasoline would go to $3.50 per gallon and cars would go up 50% in price in 10 years I would have picked some place different.

Plutonic Panda
10-29-2013, 01:51 PM
Now that's not very platonic of you...My username was not really meant to be defined in that way. It was meant to signify a Panda is made from Plutonium. I just thought the word(well, it's just a word that I made up) Plutonic Panda sounded better than Plutonium Panda. I made it specifically for m Xbox Live account.

Plutonic Panda
10-29-2013, 09:08 PM
My username was not really meant to be defined in that way. It was meant to signify a Panda is made from Plutonium. I just thought the word(well, it's just a word that I made up) Plutonic Panda sounded better than Plutonium Panda. I made it specifically for m Xbox Live account.I'm sure that reply gave a few chuckles. I didn't mean that I believe all Pandas are made from Plutonium, rather than a fake Panda avatar I made on the internet that was made from Plutonium and radioactive.

worthy cook
10-29-2013, 09:30 PM
That's what I was going to say. My cousin lives on 150th and Western and two years ago, he worked downtown. He has since moved to working two miles from his house. All of my other friends I mentioned in the previous post live in North Edmond and work either downtown or around 63rd and Broadway area. I don't know anybody who lives near downtown and work in the Edmond area. I'm sure there are those people out there, but I don't know any of them.

I lived in Edgemere and worked in Edmond for the past 4 years until moving up to 150th and western. It was awesome though going against traffic every day.

As for me moving up here I know exactly what I'm getting into. I've had my fun near city core but I just got married and starting a family soon and I'm ok with being 15-20 from downtown. (Plus I sold my Edgemere house for $170 sq/ft. Cha Ching!) But besides thunder games, my group of friends rarely go down there anyway unless we have out of town guests. We all stick to western area and occasionally midtown.

Long story shory both downtown and suburbs have pros and cons, and good things are happening all over the city. but razzing people (not you warreng but in general) for not wanting to live where you want them to is just silly.

Just the facts
10-30-2013, 07:19 AM
So you move to the burbs so you can send your kids to school. Now we know why meetings like this one are necessary. When are people going to finally connect the dots?

OKC school, city officials discuss bus system | News OK (http://newsok.com/okc-school-city-officials-discuss-bus-system/article/3898966)

on edit - the dots being low density sprawl, dendritic street patterns, and regional schools designed for 750 to 2000 kids. Make smaller neighborhood schools with a connected street network so kids can walk to a local school. Instead of one school with 5 or 6 classrooms for each grade, make 5 small schools that only have one class for each grade.

worthy cook
10-30-2013, 07:47 AM
I think schools were father down our list because we intend to send them to private. but the schools in our area are highly rated so I can see why some would move up there.

bradh
10-30-2013, 07:48 AM
OKCPS doesn't have school buses?


• Reducing the rate at which schoolchildren move from school to school. School board member Ruth Veales said too many families lack fundamental housing security in the city. “Families need stability,” she said.

You know what solves this? Stop the slum apartment complexes offering one month free rent. These families are nomadic, they just jump from free rent to free rent apartment. My cousin is a teacher in a lower income portion of a for the most part excellent school district in a suburb of Houston, and this is what happens with her elementary kids all the time.

Just the facts
10-30-2013, 08:39 AM
OKCPS does have school buses but they have the same problem a mass transit bus system has - their customers are spread to thin over an area which raises the cost to overcome the poor city panning.

adaniel
10-30-2013, 12:37 PM
Can I throw a monkey wrench into this? What about people in OKC that don't have kids?

Like a lot of things here, this discussion is filtered through a family-oriented prism. Absolutely nothing wrong with that, and frankly if urban areas want to take their growth to the next level they will ultimately need to figure out a way to keep families. With that in mind, a lot of people in my generation (Gen Y) are, for a plethora of reasons, not having kids or waiting much later in life to start having kids. Whether this is a good thing for society at large is up for discussion. I am single, but when I was in an LTR we had discussed not having kids altogether. Even here in conservative Oklahoma, the majority of the people I keep in touch with from college are now nearing 30 and very few are married. And even fewer have children, with a lot still undecided if they will or not. This is nothing revolutionary; at its greatest, it's just an acceleration of trends that have been happening for the past 50 years.

One of the strengths of OKC is that it is very kid-friendly. But if we are talking about isolation, being a single person, or even a childless couple, in the suburbs here is just mind-numbing. Take it from personal experience. My GF at the time traveled a lot so there were lots of times where it was just me. I am a pretty social person and I don't believe I ever felt the sense of isolation that I felt on several occasions in my time in the suburbs. And it wasn't much better when she was in town. My experience could be different because I did not grow up in Oklahoma. And at the time I was having a full blown "quarter-life crisis." But I do know a handful of transplants who had very similar experiences as mine. Not surprisingly, most have moved to Deep Deuce, Midtown, Gatewood, etc. or threw in the towel and left the area.

It would be nice if there were more "fun" areas in more suburban parts of OKC, i.e. Addison in Dallas or Scottsdale in Arizona. But fair or not there isn't. So for people like me, the core is kind of OKC's best hope to keep us around. If it weren't for downtown, I would likely be long gone by now. When I was still living in the burbs but hadn't quite discovered the more urban neighborhoods, I was actually making plans to relocate out of state. OKC is growing nicely, but if we want more people to move and stay here, there must be choices for all walks of life. That means healthy urban and suburban areas.

Just the facts
10-30-2013, 01:27 PM
Adaniel - the problem is that OKC suburbs (except Edmond) appear to have no interest in becoming anything other than a commuter bedroom community to OKC offering nothing except a sea of low density subdivisions with strip shopping center thrown in. No wonder GE is looking at the area around downtown OKC. Who wants to be part of that bland landscape if they don't have to be? If Norman just spent half the effort Edmond was making to redeveloped their downtown they could make a really nice place - but all they seem to care about is attracting cars off of I-35 - and then have them drive through Norman as fast as they can (makes a lot of sense doesn't it). Downtown Yukon, Midwest City, Moore, Mustang, The Village, Bethany, Warr Acres, etc etc etc - they don't even exist except in people's memories and old photographs.

bradh
10-30-2013, 01:32 PM
Addison in Dallas or Scottsdale in Arizona.

To be fair, Scottsdale really shouldn't even be considered a suburb anymore. Isn't it almost half a million people now? It's like Minneapolis/St. Paul now.

jerrywall
10-30-2013, 02:05 PM
When I think of a comparison to Addison in the Dallas metro, I look at what's happening along Memorial road.

adaniel
10-31-2013, 03:49 PM
When I think of a comparison to Addison in the Dallas metro, I look at what's happening along Memorial road.

Meh. It could be in the future. Addison is just on a much bigger scale. I think there is something like 180 restaurants and bars for a town smaller than Bethany. Of course the daytime population is huge. More important than that, there is a big cluster of young professionals and singles who live in the area, my sister being one of them. And there are a handful of developments that tend to be on a higher level than what you would find off Memorial, like Addison Circle. For the record, I personally prefer what we have here in Downtown/Bricktown/AA/Midtown, and if developed properly, could be something really special. But I have to give Addison credit because it gives people in Dallas a nice alternative should they not care for the Downtown/Uptown scene but still want a dense, young, and fun area. Which is something we definitely do lack here in our own suburban areas, with the caveat of course that Dallas is a much larger city.


To be fair, Scottsdale really shouldn't even be considered a suburb anymore. Isn't it almost half a million people now? It's like Minneapolis/St. Paul now.

I think you might be thinking of Mesa, which is indeed huge. Scottsdale is still pretty sizable at about 230K. Old town Scottsdale is probably smaller than Bricktown but it still attracts a nice crowd.

bradh
10-31-2013, 09:12 PM
No I'm definitely talking about Scottsdale, but you're right Mesa fits the bill too. My wife went to ASU and I lived in both Chandler and Gilbert, and spent two years working in Mesa. The East Valley is a massive place. That's a huge metro.

Urbanized
11-03-2013, 12:13 PM
Flew out to Phoenix in '12 to see the Thunder play the Suns. I think the trip was 4 days, if I recall. Stayed (and spent plenty of time) in Scottsdale. I could never tell where Scottsdale ended and Phoenix began. Might as well be the same city.

bradh
11-03-2013, 03:11 PM
Flew out to Phoenix in '12 to see the Thunder play the Suns. I think the trip was 4 days, if I recall. Stayed (and spent plenty of time) in Scottsdale. I could never tell where Scottsdale ended and Phoenix began. Might as well be the same city.

You can't, all the cities border up against each other, much like DFW. It's not like Houston where you have lots of suburbs, unincorporated county controlled land, and then Houston city limits.

traxx
11-05-2013, 03:22 PM
When it was first announced that KD was moving downtown, I got this humorous image in my head of KD suiting up, saying "Mom, I'm going out to play," and walking to the arena in his uni and playing shoes. The absurdity of that image makes me laugh.

Rover
11-05-2013, 03:50 PM
I dare say that KD didn't have much in common with his neighbors as he is 24 and single, an athlete and runs with a very small posse. His neighbors are older and most with families and businesses. Doubt they really socialized much. However, I know others in Gaillardia and they have other friends their and are social with neighbors. They don't feel isolated at all. KD moving downtown does not validate the hatred of suburbs. It is more a time of life and lifestyle issue...not to mention convenience as he opens his place.

Just the facts
11-05-2013, 05:08 PM
When it was first announced that KD was moving downtown, I got this humorous image in my head of KD suiting up, saying "Mom, I'm going out to play," and walking to the arena in his uni and playing shoes. The absurdity of that image makes me laugh.

That might be funny but that is one hack of a commercial idea for Downtown OKC Inc to promote downtown.

Teo9969
11-05-2013, 05:34 PM
What JTF said…you should send that idea to them (DTOKCINC) or The Hill immediately.

Urbanized
11-05-2013, 05:45 PM
I'll pass it along to DOKC marketing staff with full credit to JTF. That said, getting KD to do a local commercial these days is no mean feat, I'm sure. Perhaps impossible.

Pete
11-05-2013, 05:59 PM
What JTF said…you should send that idea to them (DTOKCINC) or The Hill immediately.

Storyboard for downtown OKC / general OKC promotion:

[Fade in...]
1. Durant wakes up, surveys his beautiful townhome, steps out onto his terrace with a skyline view to have his coffee
2. Now in warmups with ball under his arm, turns to his mother and says, "Mom, I'm going out to play".
3. Dribbling through Deep Deuce, with Calvary, Aloft and Level as a backdrop (-Hi Kevin! -Hi y'all!)
4. Dribbling along the canal... Stops in to say hello to friends at KD's. (-Hi Kevin! -Hi y'all!)
5. Dribbling through the Myriad Gardens, passes the skating rink and Park House Restaurant (-Hi Kevin! -Hi y'all!) with Devon Tower and the rest of the skyline in the background.
6. Dribbles right into the Peake; heads to the locker room (Team: Hi Kevin! KD looks at the camera and gets focused and serious: Hi y'all).
7. Game time!
8: Tag line: "OKC: It may be KD's world, but you can live in it."
[FTB]