View Full Version : Waters Edge Winery



Pete
09-30-2013, 11:30 AM
$250,000 building permit today to remodel 712 N. Broadway (directly next to Lululemon) into Water's Edge Winery.

Yet another great business / retailer for Automobile Alley which is fast becoming an awesome urban district.


http://www.oklahomacounty.org/assessor/Searches/sketches/picfile/2729/R010011792001rA.jpg

http://watersedgewineries.com/

http://watersedgewineries.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/home-page.jpg

http://watersedgewineries.com/wp-content/uploads/2012/06/Waters-Edge-Bar-pic-Color-Final-300x232.jpg


From their website:


We offer several wines that can only be found at our winery locations. Many people have never discovered a wine they really enjoy, so we created a lineup of wines that are easy to drink for the novice consumer and introduce them to the pleasure of wine. Some examples of these wines include a Blackberry Merlot, Cranberry Chianti and Green Apple Gewurztraminer. Our newest additions include cocktails that are based on wine, but taste just like the real thing. Some specialty creations are a Cosmopolitan, Long Island Ice Tea and even a Lemon-lime Margarita!

In addition to wine sales by the bottle and glass, a Waters Edge Winery also offers the following:

Bistro-style appetizers and desserts
A light menu which includes tapas, Panini-style sandwiches, artisan cheeses and fruits, as well as a selection of sweet treats complimentary to the wine.

Custom labeling
Guests will be able to choose from a variety of designs to create their own wine label for gifts, weddings, corporate sponsorships or private labeling.

Bottling experience
Guests may create their own vintage of wine and have a bottling party at the winery. This starts with guests choosing one of the wines on our menu. We present their custom crush in a small batch format where they sprinkle the yeast one top of the must. Guests return a couple months later to have a bottling party. They bottle, cork and custom label their wine, often bringing groups of friends to enjoy the fun. Itís a unique and unforgettable experience!

Wine ClubWaters Edge Wineries
Guests may join a wine club that offers unique benefits such as a selected bottle of wine, complimentary tasting, discounts and special events. This creates a recurring monthly revenue stream for the Waterís Edge Winery as well as loyal guests. In the traditional wine club model, the winery ships the wine quarterly to its customers. This limits direct interaction with the winery and the opportunity for additional sales. At the Waters Edge Winery, most guests come to the winery monthly to pick up their bottles Ė increasing traffic and visitation patterns.

Private Parties and Events
Locations will often be designed to allow private events to occur simultaneously during regular operating hours to eliminate any conflict. Private tasting areas and seating areas can be segregated from the main tasting room to accommodate receptions, birthdays, and anniversaries as well as attracting corporations looking for a venue to host company-sponsored events in a convenient, classy location tailored to their needs.

bchris02
09-30-2013, 11:50 AM
Cool. More stuff like this will really make auto alley a place to be. Personally I already think its one of if not the most aesthetically vibrant urban districts we have with all the neon. More nightlife there will help tremendously to take it to the next level.

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 12:17 PM
I'm sure it's great...but as a wine enthusiast these types of places make me want to jump into a fire :calvin2:

Pete
09-30-2013, 12:34 PM
I'm sure it's great...but as a wine enthusiast these types of places make me want to jump into a fire :calvin2:

Fortunately for you, in the immediate area is Broadway Wine Merchants and Peloton.

Something for everyone. :)

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 12:39 PM
Fortunately for you, in the immediate area is Broadway Wine Merchants and Peloton.

Something for everyone. :)

Agreed :)

warreng88
09-30-2013, 01:30 PM
I'm sure it's great...but as a wine enthusiast these types of places make me want to jump into a fire :calvin2:

Why is that?

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 01:51 PM
Why is that?

Blackberry Merlot, Cranberry Chianti and Green Apple Gewurztraminer

::shudders::

warreng88
09-30-2013, 01:59 PM
Blackberry Merlot, Cranberry Chianti and Green Apple Gewurztraminer

::shudders::

Gotcha. I wasn't being sarcastic, I am just not a wine drinker so I didn't know what certain people had against it.

I am sure you have seen the movie Sideways, so I will quote a line from there you would appreciate:

"If they want to drink Merlot, we're drinking Merlot."
"No, if anyone orders Merlot, I'm leaving. I am NOT drinking any f#$king Merlot!"

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 02:06 PM
Yeah, most OK wineries by default target the low-hanging fruit, as it were. The lowest common denominator, meaning people who usually aren't regular or sophisticated wine drinkers. And I say this as someone who is certainly not a regular or especially sophisticated wine drinker.

So Oklahoma wineries typically go for a lot of super-sweet and berry-based stuff. It's the same way that the vast percentage of Oklahoma breweries started with lagers and switch beers for the Budweiser-swilling crowd. More accessible means more sales and greater chances of success, but not necessarily a better product. I'm guessing you will eventually start seeing some really excellent Oklahoma wines, but right now we are - and this is a charitable/generous description - where California wines were in maybe the sixties or seventies; sort of a punchline for wine drinkers. Places like California and the Pacific Northwest overcame that though, and there is no reason to think we won't do that here.

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 02:22 PM
Gotcha. I wasn't being sarcastic, I am just not a wine drinker so I didn't know what certain people had against it.

I am sure you have seen the movie Sideways, so I will quote a line from there you would appreciate:

"If they want to drink Merlot, we're drinking Merlot."
"No, if anyone orders Merlot, I'm leaving. I am NOT drinking any f#$king Merlot!"

I actually haven't seen the movie, but I do know that that part is a brilliant joke. The coveted wine they want to get ahold of is almost entirely Merlot...

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 02:25 PM
Yeah, most OK wineries by default target the low-hanging fruit, as it were. The lowest common denominator, meaning people who usually aren't regular or sophisticated wine drinkers. And I say this as someone who is certainly not a regular or especially sophisticated wine drinker.

So Oklahoma wineries typically go for a lot of super-sweet and berry-based stuff. It's the same way that the vast percentage of Oklahoma breweries started with lagers and switch beers for the Budweiser-swilling crowd. More accessible means more sales and greater chances of success, but not necessarily a better product. I'm guessing you will eventually start seeing some really excellent Oklahoma wines, but right now we are - and this is a charitable/generous description - where California wines were in maybe the sixties or seventies; sort of a punchline for wine drinkers. Places like California and the Pacific Northwest overcame that though, and there is no reason to think we won't do that here.

uuuhhhhh....You ever been in Oklahoma in the summer? It's not particularly conducive to good grape growth. Not saying we won't have an occasional good wine come around from Oklahoma...but most will not have much of a chance, and I'm not sold that OK can produce a truly excellent, world-class wine...especially year in and year out with our schizophrenic weather.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 02:26 PM
Wineries don't have to rely Oklahoma grapes. In fact most don't.

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 02:27 PM
Wineries don't have to use Oklahoma grapes. In fact most don't.

True, but then it's a little disingenuous to call them Oklahoma wines.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 02:35 PM
Also, by the way, my understanding is that there are certain varietals that can and do flourish in Oklahoma. From what I have been told there are some grapes that produce better juice when "stressed" from hot summers, etc. The problem is that exceptional grapes take generations (growing seasons, not human generations) of growth before they become exceptional. So, even as farmers find the "perfect" grape variety for Oklahoma growth, since the industry is new here it might take 20 or more years before the quality grapes are grown in a large enough amount to support even one reasonably-successful winery. Considering that this is an agriculturally-focused state, I have no doubt that researchers at OSU, for instance, or the Oklahoma Department of Agriculture won't identify and develop great strains that thrive in the various soil conditions and climate zones in the state. It will just take time. In the meantime, most if not all wineries here import some/most/all of their juice.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 02:37 PM
True, but then it's a little disingenuous to call them Oklahoma wines.
Why is that? Are they not formulated, aged and bottled here? Breweries like COOP Aleworks use grains from Europe and elsewhere in the U.S.A., are they not Oklahoma beers?

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 02:41 PM
Why is that? Are they not formulated, aged and bottled here? Breweries like COOP Aleworks use grains from Europe and elsewhere in the U.S.A., are they not Oklahoma beers?

The wine is the grape, not the winemaker or the barrels or anything like that.

The French have a word for it: Terroir

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 02:58 PM
I understand this. I am saying that in Oklahoma (and in fact nationally) for better or for worse the wine making process and the growing of the grapes has become disconnected, as winemaking has become trendy and also tourism-focused. It is a different business model, which I agree turns the notion of wine on its head quite a bit. I would guess that outside of California and the Pac Northwest MOST wineries in the U.S. buy grapes from elsewhere, usually from those regions if not international sources. In the case of current Oklahoma wineries that is a good thing, because as you note the grapes here are generally not up to par. That might change at some point.

By the way, to illustrate that a hot/arid climate doesn't necessarily mean no chance at decent grapes, I would encourage you to try some of the wines coming out of SW Arizona right now, for instance Caduceus.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 03:04 PM
And regarding the process not being the wine, while I also understand this, you will find some who say that during the nineties, etc. the grapes coming from places like the Willamette Valley in Oregon and Washington were generally superior to California grapes due to climate and growing conditions. But because the best vintners were still in Cali the wines from there were superior. When the experienced winemakers themselves started moving to the NW was when you started seeing Oregon and Washington wines become award winners. There is something to be said for the craft, too. Undoubtedly in Oklahoma we are lacking in both the agriculture AND the craft, however.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 03:07 PM
But back to the topic at hand, great news about the new business going into that location. I drove by that building this very day and wondered if it would soon be a target for redevelopment.

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 03:26 PM
I understand this. I am saying that in Oklahoma (and in fact nationally) for better or for worse the wine making process and the growing of the grapes has become disconnected, as winemaking has become trendy and also tourism-focused. It is a different business model, which I agree turns the notion of wine on its head quite a bit. I would guess that outside of California and the Pac Northwest MOST wineries in the U.S. buy grapes from elsewhere, usually from those regions if not international sources. In the case of current Oklahoma wineries that is a good thing, because as you note the grapes here are generally not up to par. That might change at some point.

By the way, to illustrate that a hot/arid climate doesn't necessarily mean no chance at decent grapes, I would encourage you to try some of the wines coming out of SW Arizona right now, for instance Caduceus.

To be sure, I never said "no chance" at decent grapes. But Caduceus is a great example of why the climate is going to struggle to produce world class wines. They do a really good job for what they have, but they lack, on the whole, both the consistency vintage in vintage out and the variety of textures, acidity, tannins, etc. available to regions throughout Oregon and Washington, and in places like Napa. They remind me a lot of many of the Central Coast wines that just can't quite push into that excellent range. About the only winery that has done it, for me, is Turley, and that's because Zinfandel can negotiate the climate.

mcca7596
09-30-2013, 06:27 PM
By the way, to illustrate that a hot/arid climate doesn't necessarily mean no chance at decent grapes, I would encourage you to try some of the wines coming out of SW Arizona right now, for instance Caduceus.

Sorry to be a stickler but Caduceus is actually in the high country between Phoenix and Flagstaff. The only recognized viticultural area in Arizona is, however, around the Tucson area, but they aren't as hot in the summer as the immediate Phoenix area and points SW.

RadicalModerate
09-30-2013, 07:34 PM
I'm even more sorry about being even more of a stickler but, "in reality" Caduceus is actually this:
http://www.zackdarling.com/wp-content/uploads/2010/01/Caduceus-3.png
which I translate to mean that they/he/she/them or it has (or have) fairly good wine.

A few steps up from, say, Italian Swiss Colony "Arriba" (featuring some adobe huts and maybe a burro and a cactus on the label) yet not yet quite where the best of "Tres Suenos" (local) is at.

For more details, be sure to put the documentary "Corked" on your Netflix viewing list.

Urbanized
09-30-2013, 07:58 PM
Sorry to be a stickler but Caduceus is actually in the high country between Phoenix and Flagstaff. The only recognized viticultural area in Arizona is, however, around the Tucson area, but they aren't as hot in the summer as the immediate Phoenix area and points SW.
Excuse me, you are correct. I don't know why I was thinking Jerome was SW. Could have sworn I checked it out on a map a couple of years ago, since I wanted to visit while I was in Phoenix. Nevertheless, my point is that despite some parts being very arid and prone to heat, Oklahoma is far from the worst place in the country to grow grapes. It just depends on the grape. It also depends upon the part of the state, which has LOTS of geographic and even climate variations.

Teo9969
09-30-2013, 08:21 PM
I really wish South Colorado would start making wine. Great area of the country for grapes but seemingly untapped.

urbanCOWBOY
10-01-2013, 02:20 PM
I like the idea of Oklahoma wineries. Oklahoma gets a bad rap with its wine, but we have to start somewhere. Also, I met the owners at Shop Hop, and they are great people. They really love wine, Oklahoma, and Automobile Alley.

I think that Waters Edge will be a fantastic addition to the downtown area.

Teo9969
10-01-2013, 02:24 PM
It should be noted, that several fantastic wineries have ties to Oklahoma, most notably, Far Niente/Nickel & Nickel. Not a bad one to have ties to ;)

Pete
10-22-2013, 01:47 PM
Rendering of this space from MODA (http://themodaexperience.com/index.php/waters-edge-winery/):

http://themodaexperience.com/mc/wp-content/uploads/2013/10/MODA-WatersEdgeWinery.jpg


Automobile Alley will be adding an exciting new business in 2014! Water’s Edge Winery, a franchise started in California, will be making its Oklahoma debut at 712 N. Broadway, formerly home to Lululemon.

Water’s Edge Winery is the first of its kind in Oklahoma, making owners Sarah & Adam Edwards and Roger Cude pioneers of the industry. At this new location, you’ll not only be able to sample a variety of wines, but also taste bistro-style menu items prepared by local Oklahoma City eateries. In addition, guests can participate in the bottling experience, even creating their own labels for custom wine blends. Bottles of wine will be available for sale, and the venue will include rentable space for private parties and events.

The building, built in 1918 as an auto mechanic shop, features industrial design elements that will remain, a nod to Oklahoma City’s manufacturing history. Taking our cues from the rustic interior and coastal climate of Water’s Edge origin, MODA has worked with the clients to deliver a cost-effective, yet equally impressive design for the interior. One of the main features will be the recycled cork “chandeliers”, used throughout the first and second floor of the building.

- See more at: Water?s Edge Winery | ModaModa (http://themodaexperience.com/index.php/waters-edge-winery/#sthash.dbosObJq.dpuf)

Pete
01-31-2014, 11:00 AM
Another small building permit today for this business; should be under construction soon if not already.

kevinpate
01-31-2014, 12:39 PM
looks interesting. What became of the lululemon that had been there?

DammitDan
01-31-2014, 12:54 PM
Kevinpate, my understanding is that location was just a Lululemon showroom until the full store was opened in Classen Curve.

Urbanized
01-31-2014, 11:11 PM
I heard somewhere that Thabo Sefalosha was in investor. Does anyone have info to confirm or refute this?

Pete
02-01-2014, 09:09 AM
Water’s Edge Winery is the first "Urban Winery Franchise"
that combines one part winery and one part wine bar in a relaxing atmosphere: This unique concept will offer an ambiance created by a theme of flowing water, a premium selection of cigars, custom wine-making and labeling, and the vibrant attraction of live musical entertainment on a patio. We will capitalize on our exclusive relationship with Thabo Sefolosha of the OKC Thunder, and utilize our celebrity marketing strategy to create a premier brand for our winery.

Adam Edwards-Visionary, Author, Humanitarian | LinkedIn (http://www.linkedin.com/pub/adam-edwards-visionary-author-humanitarian/7/715/697)

Urbanized
02-01-2014, 04:10 PM
Oh, well, there you go. Forgot that I met Adam a while back. That's not where I heard about the Thabo angle though.

jmpokc1957
02-01-2014, 05:32 PM
And regarding the process not being the wine, while I also understand this, you will find some who say that during the nineties, etc. the grapes coming from places like the Willamette Valley in Oregon and Washington were generally superior to California grapes due to climate and growing conditions. But because the best vintners were still in Cali the wines from there were superior. When the experienced winemakers themselves started moving to the NW was when you started seeing Oregon and Washington wines become award winners. There is something to be said for the craft, too. Undoubtedly in Oklahoma we are lacking in both the agriculture AND the craft, however.

We have great wine up here in Oregon! Where I live( in the northern Willamette Valley ) I have wineries all around me. They produce great Pinot Noir but also good Merlot. As you noted, the wineries around here have to import their Merlo grapest from warmer, drier climes in Southern Oregon and Eastern Washington.
Another example, perhaps similar to Oklahoma, would be grapes produced in some very warm and dry areas of Spain. You just have to match the grape to the climate and take it from there.

When we arrived here from OKC in 1976 we were amazed at all the wine sold in grocery stores. Way back then in OKC dad had to buy wine in the package stores and it wasn't very good. Hopefully times have changed in Oklahoma.

Urbanized
02-01-2014, 09:08 PM
Wines, strong beers, selections of all are better here these days - including some great Oklahoma craft beers - but no more convenient. You still have to buy everything room temperature in a liquor store (excepting lousy 3.2 beer).

Regarding the grapes in Oregon, heck, they're even amazing at the grocery store. I remember buying some locally-grown grapes there and coming to the conclusion that I had never actually tasted grapes before that moment. To this day I have a hard time describing it to people, but something as pedestrian as a supermarket grape can vary incredibly based upon where you buy it.

GaryOKC6
02-02-2014, 07:20 AM
Oh, well, there you go. Forgot that I met Adam a while back. That's not where I heard about the Thabo angle though.

Adam is also a former Dallas Cowboy player.

no1cub17
03-26-2014, 08:18 PM
Any update on this project? Always try to look at the site when driving down Broadway (probably shouldn't do this) so was just curious.

Pete
03-26-2014, 08:20 PM
They posted this on their Facebook page on 3/21:


Progress Report! The journey has been long and challenging, but we're over-joyed to announce we just received our final building permits to finish construction. Without support from our partners, family, and key-opinion leaders at the highest level, this journey wouldn't be possible, and for that, we are forever grateful. To our loyal fans and strategic partners, we can't wait to blow you away with quality service and custom products, tailor-made for a unique experience. Now the real count down begins. Stay tuned for the 30-day "Wine Club" pre-sale announcement soon!!!

Wambo36
03-27-2014, 09:49 AM
True, but then it's a little disingenuous to call them Oklahoma wines.
I hate to risk taking the thread astray again, but can't pass up the opportunity to plug a " truly Oklahoma " winery. The Range Winery in Anadarko grows, ages and bottles everything they sell on site. They've won numerous awards and are passionate about true Oklahoma wines and grapes. It's owned by a good friend and the only place he sells, other than the winery, is at events in Medicine Park.

Urbanized
03-27-2014, 02:24 PM
His wines are 100% Oklahoma grapes? That's impressive, if so. I don't think very many if any other wineries have been able to attain that yet.

Wambo36
03-27-2014, 05:38 PM
Yes, he's very proud of that. Unless I'm mistaken, he only uses grapes that are grown in his vineyard. Myself and another friend spent the day with him at the blues festival in Medicine Park last year and learned a lot more about "local" wines than I knew was out there. He calls around harvest time and we try to go help him.

Pete
04-09-2014, 06:37 PM
The project is back on track.

Here are some renderings:



http://www.okctalk.com/attachments/retail-services/7346d1397086553-waters-edge-winery-we1.jpg



http://www.okctalk.com/attachments/retail-services/7347d1397086555-waters-edge-winery-we2.jpg



http://www.okctalk.com/attachments/retail-services/7348d1397086556-waters-edge-winery-we3.jpg

DammitDan
04-10-2014, 10:41 AM
That sign is so goofy.

Pete
04-10-2014, 10:47 AM
Love the sign.

Will be another great neon addition to Auto Alley.

AP
07-20-2014, 03:03 PM
http://ih.constantcontact.com/fs106/1116977075846/img/11.jpg

Pete
08-27-2014, 11:58 AM
Looks like they are open for business:



https://fbcdn-sphotos-h-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpf1/v/t1.0-9/10404886_712033488882026_7580187428730348300_n.jpg ?oh=3aa1fb1fa906ddb08b40a257314bb5d5&oe=547CAD63&__gda__=1416787209_d3ba3a3a17a704e786ac57ead320944 e

https://fbcdn-sphotos-d-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xfp1/t1.0-9/10390933_712033428882032_198248305738068169_n.jpg

https://fbcdn-sphotos-g-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xpa1/t1.0-9/10590654_702637253154983_501124825039791658_n.jpg

https://scontent-a-lax.xx.fbcdn.net/hphotos-xfa1/v/t1.0-9/10616199_712033412215367_8628738852301413227_n.jpg ?oh=bb8e9855820128fd8c17265b31af7643&oe=54694F79

ljbab728
12-10-2014, 11:44 PM
A nice update with video by Brianna.

http://www.oklahoman.com/article/5374828?embargo=1


It’s all about the experience when customers come to Waters Edge Winery in Automobile Alley to bottle their own wine, said co-owner and resident winemaker Roger Cude.

It’s like Build-A-Bear Workshop for grownups.

Would-be wine makers can put a bottle into the filling machine and watch as it fills with their favorite white, red or fruit wine. They also can affix their own, custom-designed label on each bottle and cork it by hand.

The winery opened in September in a restored Packard car dealership building at 712 N Broadway. A massive light fixture made from the old window frames from the historic building hangs over the bar. The upstairs, which once stored automobile parts, has been transformed into an events space with exposed brick walls and polished concrete floors that can hold about 100 people.


The upstairs event space looks amazing.

Urbanized
12-11-2014, 07:45 AM
Attended a party in the upstairs last night and it was indeed pretty special. A real high point was the window on the front that fully opens to create a balcony-like effect over Broadway below.

John Knight
12-11-2014, 07:55 AM
Attended a party in the upstairs last night and it was indeed pretty special. A real high point was the window on the front that fully opens to create a balcony-like effect over Broadway below.

I assume you are referring to this?

9710

That's pretty cool.

Urbanized
12-11-2014, 07:40 PM
I assume you are referring to this?

9710

That's pretty cool.
Yes indeed.

John Knight
12-19-2014, 07:56 AM
My wife and I stopped by here last night during Automobile Alley's Shop Hop. I must say, I was very impressed. As soon as we walked in, the owner Adam Edwards made a point to come introduce himself to us. He was very nice and made sure we had a place to sit. I met his wife and several other members of his staff. They were all very polite and attentive.

He hired a catering service for last night's event and let customers eat at no charge. The food spread was incredible. Adam said: "we plan to do this more often throughout the year".

Their wine was good but not great. However, the hospitality alone will get me back there.

Urbanized
12-19-2014, 07:17 PM
Did you try the Spanish Red? I enjoyed it.

John Knight
12-22-2014, 09:28 AM
Did you try the Spanish Red? I enjoyed it.

I did not actually. I will make a point to try that one next time I go in.