View Full Version : OnCue OKC Expansion



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Ross MacLochness
02-18-2019, 08:07 AM
But here's the thing about those cookie cutter, suburban mega gas stations; they're pretty damn nice. One thing I learned from living at 14th and Robinson throughout the 1990s is that the gritty, authentic, urban life has some shortcomings in the quality of life area. Big name brands and open square footage were in horribly short supply then and still are now, in some areas. We all love Uptown 23 and the Plaza District, but, as a neighborhood resident, sometimes you think that you deserve to have the convenience of a Sonic Drive In, or an OnCue (with a beer cave, spacious aisles, check out lines that are less than 5 people deep, space around the many gas pumps and a lower chance of being hit up for money from the beggars).

Urban areas deserve these services, IMO.

Dude you can't compare living in the core now to living in the core in the 90s. It's much much much safer now and far more developed. There is a trend towards walkability and being able to walk somewhere is seen as being convenient. I live in the uptown area and don't have to wait in lines "5 people deep" for anything nor do I get hit up for money all the time. Gas stations, even huge on cues aren't bad, and you are right, on-cues have a lot of products members of the community would want to buy, but the problem is that the design and scale are just counter to the very efforts making these places safer and more interesting.

Ross MacLochness
02-18-2019, 08:10 AM
Yes, but I would suggest that would be due to geographic density and/or high land acquisition costs. Neither of which are a problem in Oklahoma City IMO. In fact, at over 600 square miles, OKC probably has too much land, since all of it deserves services and protections like downtown gets.

This is the precise reason we shouldn't build on cues in the core. We need to create a certain level of density for a whole host of reasons, and building a sprawling, one story, auto-centric facility will likely be counter productive.

onthestrip
02-18-2019, 08:35 AM
From Steve's chat:


JoBeth: We are still awaiting a city council vote. From feed back I've received from folks in surrounding neighborhoods is they are not excited about having such a suburban style gas station in this area that has become more dense and walkable. I do understand that On Cue has worked with the neighborhood and the commissions to make it as pedestrian friendly as possible. But there is already a gas station around there. It doesn't make sense to me to have a very suburban gas station there even though they have made modifications.

I really hope they are successful in killing this project. Good for the people of OKC to finally stand up and not be deterred like gimmicky tactics of more landscaping which should be standard or those who are playing a strawman; I'm referring to the people who are trying to say that "they don't want trees" after there is a repeated push to have higher standards for landscaping around OKC. I've never been a fan of OnCue or the mega gas station concept and I'm certainly no fan of placing a cookie cutter gas station in an area that has seen good developments and prospects lately for increased walkability and urbanism.

Ok, talking about design and site planning, fine, we should want good design. But JoBeth bringing up the fact that there is already a gas station in the area? Sorry councilwoman, your job isnt to limit investment or competition because you think demand is already being met. That gas station is dirty, unsightly and very small. It can serve only a fraction of what OnCue could serve. And if OnCue, or any other business, submits plans to build something, properly follows any rezoning, plan approvals, etc., and even has community meetings and most people are on board, then they should be allowed to build.

I dont care if theres 20 gas stations all clustered together, as long as they are allowed its not your job as council member to deny it.

Dob Hooligan
02-18-2019, 08:50 AM
I think we're nearing a "chicken or the egg" discussion. Major metropolitan areas are, by definition, densely populated. And that density creates higher real estate costs and making do in smaller spaces. It also creates functional walkability. At over 600 square miles, OKC is working on aspirational walkability IMO.

Plutonic Panda
02-18-2019, 08:55 AM
Ok, talking about design and site planning, fine, we should want good design. But JoBeth bringing up the fact that there is already a gas station in the area? Sorry councilwoman, your job isnt to limit investment or competition because you think demand is already being met. That gas station is dirty, unsightly and very small. It can serve only a fraction of what OnCue could serve. And if OnCue, or any other business, submits plans to build something, properly follows any rezoning, plan approvals, etc., and even has community meetings and most people are on board, then they should be allowed to build.

I dont care if theres 20 gas stations all clustered together, as long as they are allowed its not your job as council member to deny it.
I disagree. It doesn’t matter now because what I want isn’t happening and the gas station will be built. This isn’t the worst thing to have happened in OKC lately.

Ross MacLochness
02-18-2019, 09:00 AM
I think we're nearing a "chicken or the egg" discussion. Major metropolitan areas are, by definition, densely populated. And that density creates higher real estate costs and making do in smaller spaces. It also creates functional walkability. At over 600 square miles, OKC is working on aspirational walkability IMO.

You aren't wrong. I'm saying that creating density (even if it feels artificial or aspirational at first) is essential to the long term health of our community. Therefore, I feel like it is in the city's best interest to try to limit huge auto oriented developments in the parts of town we are simultaneously trying to densify.

Dob Hooligan
02-18-2019, 09:16 AM
I love our central city. I would never intend to claim it is bad in any way. The development is great, and mid-town is very near and dear to my heart. I get hit up for money there at about the same level as I do anywhere else (except for the General Pershing, May Avenue to Pennsylvania area spill off near 10th and May). But I think Western is never going to be part of the true "urban core" because it is the beginning of the single family, one story housing developments, that begin south of 10th and become the basis of the city going west.

shawnw
02-18-2019, 09:30 AM
Slightly off topic but something to begin thinking about is that it's only a matter of two or three decades before gasoline cars are out or in serious decline. China has mandated 100% electric cars by 2050, I believe the EU has mandated 2040. Even if the US holds out longer, eventually there will be a supply chain problem. But we're already starting to see shifts in the US market towards electric.

I know there will be gas cars for long after new ones are mandated away, but market forces will impose changes in the refueling landscape. Of course, none of that means we won't still need "refuling stations" of some sort, but there will be an excellent opportunity to think about how refueling stations of should be (re)designed. Also, any new stations going in over the next couple decades we should almost think of as temporary.

Pete
02-18-2019, 09:48 AM
^

You can be guaranteed that Oklahoma will be one of the very last states to convert vehicles to alternative energy.

California has very tight restrictions, demanding that a percentage of all cars are alternative fuels. There are certain thresholds by year and therefore the infrastructure is starting to change somewhat.

But I don't think many of us will live long enough for a big change here in Oklahoma. We can't even tax oil and gas at an appropriate level, I don't see state lawmakers taking this on; it will have to be forced upon us by the federal government.

shawnw
02-18-2019, 10:11 AM
That's very valid.

Ross MacLochness
02-18-2019, 10:49 AM
I love our central city. I would never intend to claim it is bad in any way. The development is great, and mid-town is very near and dear to my heart. I get hit up for money there at about the same level as I do anywhere else (except for the General Pershing, May Avenue to Pennsylvania area spill off near 10th and May). But I think Western is never going to be part of the true "urban core" because it is the beginning of the single family, one story housing developments, that begin south of 10th and become the basis of the city going west.

Yes, but even those single family neighborhoods are "dense" by OKC standards and quite walkable. This development is a step backward even in terms of those neighborhoods. What will make core neighborhoods even more attractive moving forward is creating safe connections between places that don't require cars, not creating places for cars at the expense of those connections.

citywokchinesefood
02-18-2019, 01:08 PM
^

You can be guaranteed that Oklahoma will be one of the very last states to convert vehicles to alternative energy.

California has very tight restrictions, demanding that a percentage of all cars are alternative fuels. There are certain thresholds by year and therefore the infrastructure is starting to change somewhat.

But I don't think many of us will live long enough for a big change here in Oklahoma. We can't even tax oil and gas at an appropriate level, I don't see state lawmakers taking this on; it will have to be forced upon us by the federal government.

https://www.livemint.com/Industry/FiK1sb9LHRYu07C78pEaTI/End-of-fossil-fuelrun-vehicles-in-sight-says-Stanford-stud.html

I would really like to see the actual paper put out for this study. I feel like classic cars will continue to be sold and ICE vehicles will still be operated over the next 50 years. Stanford researchers seem to think auto manufacturers won't make new ICE vehicles by 2030.

http://nhne-pulse.org/rethinking-transportation-2020-2030/

Lecture from Seba

chuck5815
02-18-2019, 04:20 PM
https://www.livemint.com/Industry/FiK1sb9LHRYu07C78pEaTI/End-of-fossil-fuelrun-vehicles-in-sight-says-Stanford-stud.html

I would really like to see the actual paper put out for this study. I feel like classic cars will continue to be sold and ICE vehicles will still be operated over the next 50 years. Stanford researchers seem to think auto manufacturers won't make new ICE vehicles by 2030.

http://nhne-pulse.org/rethinking-transportation-2020-2030/

Lecture from Seba

I'm confused about lithium (and other rare earth mineral) prices. If the electric car were to achieve any meaningful level of scale, wouldn't the price of lithium go through the roof, making the cost of the battery pack, and, by extension, the EV, much more expensive?

I understand the thought that the batteries are becoming more efficient, but I find it hard to believe that efficiency would offset what could be an enormous increase in cost.

OKC Talker
02-18-2019, 08:56 PM
Ok, talking about design and site planning, fine, we should want good design. But JoBeth bringing up the fact that there is already a gas station in the area? Sorry councilwoman, your job isnt to limit investment or competition because you think demand is already being met. That gas station is dirty, unsightly and very small. It can serve only a fraction of what OnCue could serve. And if OnCue, or any other business, submits plans to build something, properly follows any rezoning, plan approvals, etc., and even has community meetings and most people are on board, then they should be allowed to build.

I dont care if theres 20 gas stations all clustered together, as long as they are allowed its not your job as council member to deny it.

I think you're forgetting about the 7-11 two blocks away: https://goo.gl/maps/TNpiMj54VVw

And denying development which is short sighted and against the greater good is exactly what we should want our city councilors to do... they're not just there to rubber stamp the David Box's of the world.

baralheia
02-18-2019, 09:23 PM
But here's the thing about those cookie cutter, suburban mega gas stations; they're pretty damn nice. One thing I learned from living at 14th and Robinson throughout the 1990s is that the gritty, authentic, urban life has some shortcomings in the quality of life area. Big name brands and open square footage were in horribly short supply then and still are now, in some areas. We all love Uptown 23 and the Plaza District, but, as a neighborhood resident, sometimes you think that you deserve to have the convenience of a Sonic Drive In, or an OnCue (with a beer cave, spacious aisles, check out lines that are less than 5 people deep, space around the many gas pumps and a lower chance of being hit up for money from the beggars).

Urban areas deserve these services, IMO.

Oh, yes, of course they do! This is just a really bad location for this particular gas station design to be shoehorned into; the northeast corner of this intersection makes far, far more sense for something of this size and scope than at the entrance to a neighborhood. OnCue is also doing a really bad job of working to find a "best of both worlds" compromise - there's design changes that can be made to their service station that would still allow OnCue to provide the services they provide, but in a manner that has much less of a negative impact on the surrounding neighborhood. Acres of open concrete with a gigantic drive-thru lane does more to harm than help the neighborhood, imho.

citywokchinesefood
02-18-2019, 10:08 PM
I'm confused about lithium (and other rare earth mineral) prices. If the electric car were to achieve any meaningful level of scale, wouldn't the price of lithium go through the roof, making the cost of the battery pack, and, by extension, the EV, much more expensive?

I understand the thought that the batteries are becoming more efficient, but I find it hard to believe that efficiency would offset what could be an enormous increase in cost.

That is part of the reason I would like to read the book and the papers he has published on the subject. What variables did he consider, and whe variables did he inevitably omit?

onthestrip
02-19-2019, 08:51 AM
I think you're forgetting about the 7-11 two blocks away: https://goo.gl/maps/TNpiMj54VVw

And denying development which is short sighted and against the greater good is exactly what we should want our city councilors to do... they're not just there to rubber stamp the David Box's of the world.

But it seems quite a stretch to say this OnCue is shortsighted or against the greater good, and its not something I want my councilmember to decide for themselves. Whats the greater good you are looking for, that this lot stays empty?

For myself, I will immediately stop using the nearby 7-11 once this opens up. I imagine many other people will too. Would be wrong for a council member to deny their approval, especially with such small controversy on the matter.

Plutonic Panda
02-19-2019, 08:55 AM
^^^ having the lot stay empty until a quality development that positively contributes to walkability for the neighborhood is the greater good instead of approving it just because it will happen sooner.

MagzOK
02-19-2019, 09:43 AM
I likely will stop here daily on my commute into work. I think the location is great and will catch a lot of morning traffic.

Pete
02-19-2019, 09:51 AM
That nearby 7-11 is pretty bad.

And they deserve to get their arse kicked when this OnCue opens up.

If these places did a better job they would have nothing to fear. One of the reasons that OnCue is so popular wherever they open is that they are just light years better than anything else in this market. Apart from the few 7-11's that have been built or upgraded only after this new competition presented itself.

All of Classen does not have a decent c-store or place to get gas. This new OnCue will absolutely kill it, which says much about the need.

OKC Talker
02-19-2019, 10:14 AM
But it seems quite a stretch to say this OnCue is shortsighted or against the greater good, and its not something I want my councilmember to decide for themselves. Whats the greater good you are looking for, that this lot stays empty?

For myself, I will immediately stop using the nearby 7-11 once this opens up. I imagine many other people will too. Would be wrong for a council member to deny their approval, especially with such small controversy on the matter.

What about the Shell on 6th and Walker, the Phillips on 11th and Broadway, the Circle K on Western and 23rd, the other 7-11 on 23rd and Penn, and the Valero on 10th and Penn, all of which are within a mile of this location. Do you think everyone will immediately stop using those also? Is there really so much unmet demand in this 1 mile radius that having OnCue right next to an existing gas station and two blocks from another high capacity gas station is a great long term plan that's for the greater good of the city?

Dob Hooligan
02-19-2019, 10:37 AM
Yes. I do. I think it can weed out a couple and make the others clean up their act.

Pete
02-19-2019, 10:39 AM
Yes. I do. I think it can weed out a couple and make the others clean up their act.

Yep.

And when those other places go out of business they will get new uses.

Plutonic Panda
02-19-2019, 10:41 AM
Yep.

And when those other places go out of business they will get new uses.
This can also be done while having a pedestrian friendly site plan similar to the example of the urban Atlanta gas station shown on this thread a few pages back.

chuck5815
02-19-2019, 10:58 AM
Yea, I would never voluntarily stop at any of the trash, gas stations that presently serve Classen. Just too dangerous, IMO.

Snowman
02-19-2019, 11:56 AM
Slightly off topic but something to begin thinking about is that it's only a matter of two or three decades before gasoline cars are out or in serious decline. China has mandated 100% electric cars by 2050, I believe the EU has mandated 2040. Even if the US holds out longer, eventually there will be a supply chain problem. But we're already starting to see shifts in the US market towards electric.

I know there will be gas cars for long after new ones are mandated away, but market forces will impose changes in the refueling landscape. Of course, none of that means we won't still need "refuling stations" of some sort, but there will be an excellent opportunity to think about how refueling stations of should be (re)designed. Also, any new stations going in over the next couple decades we should almost think of as temporary.

For better or worse, many if not most commercial buildings today are not constructed expecting to operate longer than 30 years anyway, it likely would be replaced by then if still considered a profitable business model and/or sold for land value if denser growth is a long term trend.

turnpup
02-19-2019, 11:57 AM
What about the Shell on 6th and Walker, the Phillips on 11th and Broadway, the Circle K on Western and 23rd, the other 7-11 on 23rd and Penn, and the Valero on 10th and Penn, all of which are within a mile of this location. Do you think everyone will immediately stop using those also? Is there really so much unmet demand in this 1 mile radius that having OnCue right next to an existing gas station and two blocks from another high capacity gas station is a great long term plan that's for the greater good of the city?

We live in this area and do not go to any of the gas stations you listed. I can, however, see us frequenting the new OnCue if it's easy to get in and out of. Right now the 23rd and Santa Fe location is closest to our house but we also tend to avoid it because of the traffic in that area. Thinking about it, I generally get gas up north at the OnCue at 63rd and Expressway when taking my husband to work. It seems easier.

Ross MacLochness
02-19-2019, 12:45 PM
The problem is that often times easy in-and-out for cars means an unwelcoming pedestrian experience.

onthestrip
02-19-2019, 01:01 PM
What about the Shell on 6th and Walker, the Phillips on 11th and Broadway, the Circle K on Western and 23rd, the other 7-11 on 23rd and Penn, and the Valero on 10th and Penn, all of which are within a mile of this location. Do you think everyone will immediately stop using those also? Is there really so much unmet demand in this 1 mile radius that having OnCue right next to an existing gas station and two blocks from another high capacity gas station is a great long term plan that's for the greater good of the city?

Maybe all of those other stations simply arent as convenient. Maybe I like a clean, well lit facility. Maybe I am a fan of competition, free enterprise, and property rights.

You ask, "Is there really so much unmet demand?" I dont know, but I'll let OnCue take the risk and invest $4 million or so and let the rest of us decide if there is.

Im all for good urban design. But people are acting like this will be worse than the empty lot and the cracked, uneven, or even non existent sidewalks surrounding it. It will be well lit, safe and much better for pedestrians than it is now. And if we were to wait for something else to go here, we might be waiting a long time. There was already a mixed use plan proposed for this property but that obviously couldnt get off the ground. So for now, OnCue works for me.

shawnw
02-19-2019, 01:13 PM
You're not wrong, but something else WAS going here. There was a 4-story residential going in. It went to planning commission (this was mentioned at the most recent planning commission meeting regarding OnCue). But then OnCue swooped in with a higher offer for the land, so the former owner took that deal.

onthestrip
02-19-2019, 01:22 PM
You're not wrong, but something else WAS going here. There was a 4-story residential going in. It went to planning commission (this was mentioned at the most recent planning commission meeting regarding OnCue). But then OnCue swooped in with a higher offer for the land, so the former owner took that deal.

I'd say its obvious the former owner didnt have a tenant to drive the deal and it was far from a reality.

And what are we to do if it was going to be a reality? Bar the sale and force him to develop it?

Plutonic Panda
02-19-2019, 01:28 PM
^^^ going in circles now. This has already been covered.

BridgeBurner
02-20-2019, 12:25 PM
That nearby 7-11 is pretty bad.

And they deserve to get their arse kicked when this OnCue opens up.

If these places did a better job they would have nothing to fear. One of the reasons that OnCue is so popular wherever they open is that they are just light years better than anything else in this market. Apart from the few 7-11's that have been built or upgraded only after this new competition presented itself.

All of Classen does not have a decent c-store or place to get gas. This new OnCue will absolutely kill it, which says much about the need.

I'm with you, I personally know people who have been robbed at both of the 7-11's closest to my home (the one on 23rd and Penn and the one on 10th and Western). I do not plan on returning to either one once this OnCue is operational. Personally, this OnCue will be extremely convenient and will give me a safe/convenient place to get gas on my way home from the newly renovated Homeland on 17th and Classen.

catch22
02-20-2019, 01:29 PM
Ok, talking about design and site planning, fine, we should want good design. But JoBeth bringing up the fact that there is already a gas station in the area? Sorry councilwoman, your job isnt to limit investment or competition because you think demand is already being met. That gas station is dirty, unsightly and very small. It can serve only a fraction of what OnCue could serve. And if OnCue, or any other business, submits plans to build something, properly follows any rezoning, plan approvals, etc., and even has community meetings and most people are on board, then they should be allowed to build.

I dont care if theres 20 gas stations all clustered together, as long as they are allowed its not your job as council member to deny it.

Agree. I understand she has yet to start her term, and thus has a lot to learn; but if she carries that attitude she will be a one term councilwoman. To borrow from Cooper’s previous campaign, we need a “yes, and” person not a “no, but” person. I would recommend she take a the following approach: Yes let’s encourage investment in the area, and let’s make sure it is a walkable development. Whether that’s a OnCue, or the next hipster vegan food hotspot; both can be done right.

Plutonic Panda
02-25-2019, 07:04 PM
http://www.news9.com/story/40023675/plan-for-new-oncue-angers-neighbors-in-nw-okc

"We have met with and listened to the neighbors, resulting in a design tailored for the urban core. "

LOL. In what way is this store designed for an urban core!?

rte66man
02-25-2019, 08:26 PM
I drove by the 50th and Blackwelder site today and noticed that work was FINALLY beginning there. Can't remember now how long it would take to get it opened.

PhiAlpha
02-26-2019, 04:26 AM
^

You can be guaranteed that Oklahoma will be one of the very last states to convert vehicles to alternative energy.

California has very tight restrictions, demanding that a percentage of all cars are alternative fuels. There are certain thresholds by year and therefore the infrastructure is starting to change somewhat.

But I don't think many of us will live long enough for a big change here in Oklahoma. We can't even tax oil and gas at an appropriate level, I don't see state lawmakers taking this on; it will have to be forced upon us by the federal government.

Hey Oklahoma was well on its way to heavy use of CNG as an alternative fuel and still has a higher percentage of CNG vehicles than most states. The only reason CNG adoption slowed was because the price of gasoline dropped so much in 2014...which also hurt electric vehicles. Alternative fueled vehicles will not be adopted in mass until they are as convenient and less expensive to buy/operate than gasoline.

Pete
02-26-2019, 06:33 AM
^

The ship has sailed on CNG, which is why you see tons of new hybrid and pure electric cars and virtually none for CNG.

And electric is thriving more than ever, even with gas prices very low.

CNG was an Aubrey McClendon thing in order to sell more natural gas.

baralheia
02-26-2019, 01:33 PM
http://www.news9.com/story/40023675/plan-for-new-oncue-angers-neighbors-in-nw-okc

"We have met with and listened to the neighbors, resulting in a design tailored for the urban core. "

LOL. In what way is this store designed for an urban core!?

That was my immediate reaction when I stumbled across that article last night. They didn't change a damn thing about the design of their store, except for higher walls and landscaping. In what world is the standard OnCue store layout "tailored for the urban core"?! LMAO

BridgeBurner
02-26-2019, 01:44 PM
Hmm, that news9 article says "OnCue says it plans to move one of the homes and donate it to the group Positively Paseo."
I had heard from people that went to the meetings that OnCue was going to relocate all three of the homes.

BoulderSooner
02-26-2019, 02:01 PM
This project was just approved at council

anothaokie25
02-26-2019, 10:03 PM
OnCue should look into building at NE 23rd and Grand Blvd.

The property for sale previously had a Shell gas station. Some perks is it's in close vicinity to Forest Park neighborhood, it's right off the highway, and it would provide competition for the Circle K off of I-35 and NE 36th Street. I think it would be a perfect spot for and OnCue.

anothaokie25
02-27-2019, 04:13 PM
OnCue should look into building at NE 23rd and Grand Blvd.

The property for sale previously had a Shell gas station. Some perks is it's in close vicinity to Forest Park neighborhood, it's right off the highway, and it would provide competition for the Circle K off of I-35 and NE 36th Street. I think it would be a perfect spot for and OnCue.

Or on the opposite side a little further north and south of Electro Enterprise Inc. that open land would be a nice spot.

Mr. Blue Sky
03-04-2019, 04:56 PM
The new OnCue at Northwest Expressway and Blackwelder has begun construction. Finally!

Plutonic Panda
03-04-2019, 05:16 PM
Do we have an updated tally of the number proposed and U/C?

Pete
03-04-2019, 05:18 PM
^

47 by my count.

Plutonic Panda
03-04-2019, 05:25 PM
There’s 47 proposed or U/C!? That number includes the ones built as well?

Pete
03-04-2019, 05:31 PM
There’s 47 proposed or U/C!? That number includes the ones built as well?

Yes, built and planned.

rezman
03-05-2019, 03:00 PM
Surveyors and earth moving equipment showing up at 178th & Western today.
15188

Pete
03-12-2019, 11:43 AM
http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/oncue030919a.jpg

scottk
03-13-2019, 09:41 PM
Noticed the Memorial and Eastern store is coming along with the renovation form OnCue Gen 1 to an OnCue Gen 2 store with the double main entrances and cashiers moved to the outer wall.

John1744
03-14-2019, 07:31 PM
One of the local Facebook groups is buzzing with some whispers that On Cue is coming to 23rd and Luther Road out by Harrah / Choctaw where the one of the interchanges are going to be for the Eastern OK County Turnpike ramps are going. Not sure I buy it yet but there is definitely some property out that way and will probably be a hot spot of real estate in a few years for something like that.

Pete
03-19-2019, 07:49 AM
OnCue teaming with the fire department to be locations for Safe Place.

From a press release:


The Safe Place program is returning to OKC – a youth outreach and prevention initiative for young people in our community who need immediate help and safety. The program uses a diamond-shaped, yellow and black sign on the exterior of public places and businesses that show young people where they can go to get help. Every Oklahoma City fire station and OnCue store will be a Safe Place in OKC. Be The Change is the lead agency for Oklahoma City’s Safe Places, partnering with Pivot and SISU Youth Services. Chief Kelley and Director Roberts will hold a news conference detailing the program’s return.

Brett
03-28-2019, 05:08 PM
There was all sorts of heavy equipment at the proposed location at Blackwelder and NW Expressway today.:Smiley199

DoctorTaco
04-29-2019, 08:10 AM
The house on Classen and Western and 13th that was to be either relocated or demoed to make room for the new midtown Oncue burned this morning in a house fire. Damage appears to be extensive.

Pete
04-29-2019, 09:52 AM
http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/oncue042919.jpg

jerrywall
04-29-2019, 10:04 AM
The house on Classen and Western and 13th that was to be either relocated or demoed to make room for the new midtown Oncue burned this morning in a house fire. Damage appears to be extensive.

So that's the cause of my morning detour. I didn't get close enough to see what was on fire.

Zuplar
04-29-2019, 10:46 AM
Kind of makes you wonder why they didn't just let it finish burning.

OkiePoke
04-29-2019, 11:29 AM
Kind of makes you wonder why they didn't just let it finish burning.

There was a person on the second floor that was saved.

Thomas Vu
04-29-2019, 01:06 PM
Yiikes.