View Full Version : OKC Satisfaction Survey



ljbab728
07-17-2012, 11:29 PM
These are somewhat surprising results.

http://newsok.com/oklahoma-city-survey-shows-residents-are-increasingly-satisfied/article/3693320

http://newsok.com/at-a-glance-how-oklahoma-city-residents-feel-about-city/article/3693321?custom_click=pod_headline_politics

I think a survey of posters here would yield positive results but I doubt that it would come anywhere near 83 percent.


A whopping 83 percent of the survey's respondents said they have an excellent or good feeling about whether Oklahoma City is moving in the right direction.

Only 7 percent said they felt negatively about the city's direction, with the rest of the respondents reporting neutral feelings.

The results stood out when compared with other cities with a population of at least 250,000 people, Tatham said. Oklahoma City residents feel far better than residents of most other cities about the quality of city services, how well the city is planning for growth and how it is suited as a place to live, work, retire and raise children.

Larry OKC
07-18-2012, 09:45 AM
How are these surveys worded? Are they written to get objective answers or are they constructed to get the results the folks paying for the survey want (as is often the case)? I am not saying that was done here, but it is something that needs to be considered.

Pete
07-18-2012, 09:57 AM
It just goes to show you that a city is judged -- even by it's citizens -- by it's central core.

Really, what has changed in OKC outside the central area? I know there have been some street improvements but little else.

ljbab728
07-18-2012, 09:56 PM
How are these surveys worded? Are they written to get objective answers or are they constructed to get the results the folks paying for the survey want (as is often the case)? I am not saying that was done here, but it is something that needs to be considered.

From the survey company website.


For more than 20 years, ETC Institute has worked with local governments nationwide to gather statistically valid and representative input from residents on a wide variety of issues and topics. We have administered citizen surveys on a regular basis on a broad range of community issues to help community leaders make informed decisions.


In doing so, we have developed a vast library of standardized questions and survey instruments that get high levels of response and the kinds of information decision-makers need. With DirectionFinder, we have created an off-the-shelf resource that lets city and county leaders measure the impact of virtually any service they provide.


Through these ready-made public opinion surveys, you can get the kind of information you need to make your budget and programmatic decisions. And you can get these solid, real-world answers without the often considerable expense of customized surveys. And because we built DirectionFinder on a foundation of standardized questions, it means that you'll get results that you can compare to those of other communities like yours nationwide.


http://etcinstitute.com/DF.aspx

Larry OKC
07-19-2012, 12:12 PM
Given your first post, how do you explain the 83% then?

richosh
07-19-2012, 02:45 PM
Does anyone one know someone that was contacted to take the survey? None of my friends know anyone that did.

adaniel
07-19-2012, 02:50 PM
Does anyone one know someone that was contacted to take the survey? None of my friends know anyone that did.

Considering they surveyed 1,200 households out of around 230,000 in the city, the odds are you will probably not know anyone who took it.

bornhere
07-19-2012, 03:17 PM
A few things to bear in mind (and I say this, to be clear about it, without having looked at this year's survey, although I've read others from previous years):

While the focus of OKCTalk is mostly downtown, midtown and bricktown, ETC surveys people all over the city. This is still a city so geographically huge that it's possible to live your whole life here without ever visiting the central core. Most people, I think, base their opinions mainly on what goes on within a two-mile radius of their homes – and their businesses, if they're business owners. For people who work, for example, at Mercy Hospital and live at Council Rd. and MacArthur, the downtown boulevard and the location of the convention center are barely on the radar, if at all.

Most people want to know that they have police and fire protection in their neighborhoods and that the streets they use every day are in good repair. Streets, I see from the NewsOK article, are still an issue, as they should be.

bornhere
07-19-2012, 03:29 PM
Another thing to remember: like the J.D. Power surveys, this is a measure of perception, not of reality. It can be influenced by marketing and media as much or more as by actual performance.

Jim Kyle
07-19-2012, 05:45 PM
Does anyone one know someone that was contacted to take the survey? None of my friends know anyone that did.I do -- me. Mine was one of the 1200 households. The questions were all "plain vanilla" with no apparent bias either for or against current policies, with a 1-to-5 rating scale where 3 was "neutral," 1 was "strongly disapprove," and 5 was "strongly approve." Most of my responses were 3s, and almost none were either 1 or 5.

They also asked for suggestions but I had few to give in the specific areas that they addressed...

dankrutka
07-19-2012, 06:05 PM
This is still a city so geographically huge that it's possible to live your whole life here without ever visiting the central core. Most people, I think, base their opinions mainly on what goes on within a two-mile radius of their homes – and their businesses, if they're business owners. For people who work, for example, at Mercy Hospital and live at Council Rd. and MacArthur, the downtown boulevard and the location of the convention center are barely on the radar, if at all.

Most people want to know that they have police and fire protection in their neighborhoods and that the streets they use every day are in good repair. Streets, I see from the NewsOK article, are still an issue, as they should be.

I disagree. First, find me one OKC resident who has never been downtown. I don't buy it. And, second, how do you explain this survey then?!? This clearly is representative of what's happening in the core. As Pete said, what other areas have really changed that much?

Spartan
07-19-2012, 06:27 PM
63rd and Western has evolved quite a bit, most of the inner north side has seen some revitalization, the city is now working on the inner south side, and there is also the new outlet mall, but aside from that, I'd argue that most other areas have actually gone downhill if not stayed stagnant. NW OKC west of OK74 is nosediving.

PC schools are awful now, which is a notion I'm still pretty unused to, and I'm only in my 20s. The apartments surrounding Quail Springs have gotten pretty run-down as well. Two of city's highest crime areas are along far NW Expressway and also NW 122nd/Penn. Historic north side neighborhoods are much safer than most suburban areas. The south side is now showing promise, far removed from its mostly abandoned and run-down state of the 90s. OKC is becoming incredibly diverse. Upscale housing is occurring en masse in the JFK area, and as we all know downtown's aggregate housing starts rival fast-growing suburbs and those apartments are 98% occupied. The OKC of my youth has been turned upside down, and that's definitely a good thing.

If people really went off of what is happening in a 2 mile radius of their homes, there is no way this survey has any right showing 83% positive ratings. It's absolutely pushed by downtown. Being one who admittedly ignores anything north of Nichols Hills and south of 240, I certainly have a positive outlook for OKC. But you can't get 83% + if most of NW OKC is either stagnant or tanking atm, without those people also being downtown patrons, Thunder fans, enjoying the new shopping options, having young people who may actually stick around now, and so on.

NoOkie
07-20-2012, 07:28 AM
As a north sider outside of your loop of interest, I think you overstate the problems with crime. It's pretty localized to the ****ty apartment complexes that spawn it and a few areas right around them.

bornhere
07-20-2012, 07:42 AM
Being one who admittedly ignores anything north of Nichols Hills and south of 240, I certainly have a positive outlook for OKC.

I decided to go on some long drives around the city last spring. I visited neighborhoods I hadn't seen in thirty years, and found entirely new neighborhoods I didn't know existed. (I should perhaps mention that many years ago, I had a job that took me to literally every neighborhood in this city, even the small semi-rural communities isolated at the city's fringe.)

Small shopping centers and upscale housing developments are standing where 10 years ago there had been farmland. And many were north of Nichols Hills and south of I240 – especially south of I240.

Feel free to ignore all that, but the people who live there don't ignore it. That's their daily lives.

adaniel
07-20-2012, 08:52 AM
As a north sider outside of your loop of interest, I think you overstate the problems with crime. It's pretty localized to the ****ty apartment complexes that spawn it and a few areas right around them.

I agree. There are many solid neighborhoods in the northern and western "middle ring" areas of the city.

Also, PC schools are now experiencing some problems associated with larger, more urban districts. But I would definitely not call them "awful". Heck, I wouldn't even call OKCPS awful even though it has some pretty big challenges that are not uncommon of inner city schools.

Spartan
07-20-2012, 02:00 PM
I decided to go on some long drives around the city last spring. I visited neighborhoods I hadn't seen in thirty years, and found entirely new neighborhoods I didn't know existed. (I should perhaps mention that many years ago, I had a job that took me to literally every neighborhood in this city, even the small semi-rural communities isolated at the city's fringe.)

Small shopping centers and upscale housing developments are standing where 10 years ago there had been farmland. And many were north of Nichols Hills and south of I240 especially south of I240.

Feel free to ignore all that, but the people who live there don't ignore it. That's their daily lives.

I'm very well aware of that, as I grew up around Westmoore which is just as you described. I'm also very well aware that those far suburban areas have pockets of lower income, pockets of crime, and pockets of other problems.

But that's not my point. My point is just that the satisfaction survey is so overwhelmingly positive, a lot of citizens must be focusing more on downtown than their neighborhood. Which is a good thing. I was agreeing with other posts in making that point.

bornhere
07-20-2012, 10:17 PM
But that's not my point. My point is just that the satisfaction survey is so overwhelmingly positive, a lot of citizens must be focusing more on downtown than their neighborhood. Which is a good thing.

I understand that's your point. My point is that, as incredible as it may seem to you, most people may actually like the areas of Oklahoma City in which they live.

I don't see anything in this survey (having now read it) to support one conclusion or the other.

Spartan
07-20-2012, 11:11 PM
Where/when did I say otherwise? Not trying to be testy, I just think you're sensing more friction here than I am..

The conclusion about WHAT areas are driving the high satisfaction rates would have to be an inferred one. That said, someone would have to be pretty deep in suburban denial to object that downtown is a BIG part of our newfound civic pride.

I would likewise not downplay our citizenry's cognizance beyond their own 2-mile radius. Downtown is the beating heart of the entire metro, especially now more than ever.

SoonerBoy18
07-21-2012, 01:16 AM
The condition of the streets needs to be more the topic of discussion, I was at Oklahoma City Community College last week and I was dissapointed that the city looks like they are ignoring the south side regairding the horrible road surfaces

ljbab728
07-21-2012, 02:20 AM
The condition of the streets needs to be more the topic of discussion, I was at Oklahoma City Community College last week and I was dissapointed that the city looks like they are ignoring the south side regairding the horrible road surfaces

SoonerBoy, I drive frequently on both north and south sides of OKC and I assure you the streets are in equally bad condition in both.

richosh
07-21-2012, 08:57 AM
1200 households completed the survey. How about having the survey attached to your city water bill or a on line survey. Many more people woild have a say in local goverment.

bornhere
07-21-2012, 10:12 AM
1200 households completed the survey. How about having the survey attached to your city water bill or a on line survey. Many more people woild have a say in local goverment.

Those 1200 households represent, or at least should represent, a cross-section of Oklahoma City by location, income, age and other demographics (although you don't see the results broken down that way, which now makes me wonder if there are other crosstabs on this the public doesn't see).

Attaching a survey to the water bill or doing it online may get you more responses, but they may be less representative of what citizens as a whole are thinking.

Jim Kyle
07-21-2012, 10:25 AM
Attaching a survey to the water bill or doing it online may get you more responses, but they may be less representative of what citizens as a whole are thinking.Actually, they probably would be less representative. Those with a private ax to grind would return the form and urge others of like mind to do so as well, while those who are satisfied with things as they are, or only mild desires for major policy change, might toss the form aside -- as I do with the little newsletter that's in every bill. At least if the survey firm is using good statistical practice, the sample will give a more accurate view.

This is not to claim that sampling is always accurate, or that firms always use valid statistics -- just that the chances are better!

kevinpate
07-21-2012, 10:28 AM
SoonerBoy, I drive frequently on both north and south sides of OKC and I assure you the streets are in equally bad condition in both.

Like any city of size, work happens in pockets. I was on S Shields and some other south side roads recently. I sure wish they'd been that nice three to five years back when I drove them way more often than I do today.

ljbab728
07-21-2012, 10:09 PM
Like any city of size, work happens in pockets. I was on S Shields and some other south side roads recently. I sure wish they'd been that nice three to five years back when I drove them way more often than I do today.

The main reason I drive from my home on the north side to the south side is to visit my doctor at Southwest Medical Center. The roads in that area have been undergoing considerable upgrades and reconstruction.

Spartan
07-22-2012, 09:32 PM
Yeah, they're even putting decorative intersections in all along SW 44th (they might finally be realizing the corridor plan).

I also think road surfaces in OKC aren't bad at all, especially compared to other places in the country. I think the biggest deficiency of our street network is that there is no paved surface whatsoever for non-motorists on about 75% of our roads and streets. That is pathetic. A majority of the few sidewalks that do exist, because they are in older parts of town, are crumbling to the point of being overtaken by weeds.

The NW Expressway is a perfect example. The road isn't the smoothest in the world, but it's a lot better than people admit. However, no sidewalk, tons of pedestrians trudging along on the grass or dodging cars barreling toward them with no regard. It's a bad situation.

rcjunkie
07-24-2012, 10:55 AM
Yeah, they're even putting decorative intersections in all along SW 44th (they might finally be realizing the corridor plan).

I also think road surfaces in OKC aren't bad at all, especially compared to other places in the country. I think the biggest deficiency of our street network is that there is no paved surface whatsoever for non-motorists on about 75% of our roads and streets. That is pathetic. A majority of the few sidewalks that do exist, because they are in older parts of town, are crumbling to the point of being overtaken by weeds.

The NW Expressway is a perfect example. The road isn't the smoothest in the world, but it's a lot better than people admit. However, no sidewalk, tons of pedestrians trudging along on the grass or dodging cars barreling toward them with no regard. It's a bad situation.

Before retiring in 2006 I drove the NW Expressway at least twice a day, since then I travel this road at least once a week. I can honestly say I have seen fewer then a dozen pedestrians walking in this area

NoOkie
07-24-2012, 11:18 AM
Before retiring in 2006 I drove the NW Expressway at least twice a day, since then I travel this road at least once a week. I can honestly say I have seen fewer then a dozen pedestrians walking in this area

There are more east of Portland than anywhere else(Maybe near Lyrewood too), but I wouldn't characterize it as a ton. I suspect most of the pedestrians avoid it at all costs and use 63rd which has some sidewalks and a lot of bus stops.

It's still horrible how few sidewalks we have.

LandRunOkie
07-24-2012, 12:16 PM
Before retiring in 2006 I drove the NW Expressway at least twice a day, since then I travel this road at least once a week. I can honestly say I have seen fewer then a dozen pedestrians walking in this area

The area has changed a lot since 2006. The only people desperate enough to attempt to use it in its current condition are shift workers trying to get to and from work. If you've ever walked along the NW Expressway, you know exactly why there aren't more people that try it. Its not much safer than walking along the shoulder of a highway. But its not safe to look for pedestrians at 45+ mph during rush hour, you probably just haven't been looking.

LandRunOkie
07-24-2012, 07:17 PM
There are more east of Portland than anywhere else(Maybe near Lyrewood too), but I wouldn't characterize it as a ton. I suspect most of the pedestrians avoid it at all costs and use 63rd which has some sidewalks and a lot of bus stops.

The problem with 63rd is the that it crosses into Nichols Hills, a separate municipality that is hostile to sidewalks on its major streets. At least it seems that way, or else 63rd would have been sidewalked a long time ago through that area. This brings up another issue, which is that there are so many self-governing municipalities in the city that would make a coordinated, cohesive, large-scale sidewalk network very difficult. The eastern boundary of Warr Acres on the expressway is the Hideaway Pizza. From there it is only a quarter mile north to the vast Hefner trail network. So my thinking is that by sidewalking the expressway instead of 63rd, you are dealing with Warr Acres instead of Nichols Hills. You would also be giving people access to the 7 day/week bus stop at Penn Square mall.

Spartan
07-24-2012, 10:27 PM
Before retiring in 2006 I drove the NW Expressway at least twice a day, since then I travel this road at least once a week. I can honestly say I have seen fewer then a dozen pedestrians walking in this area

You weren't looking then.

And previous posters are spot-on that it is an environment that actively discourages human activity along the ROW, and yet I'm astounded that it still exists, because people still have to get to work or to get groceries - and there are a lot of car-less individuals living in that area. I can't help but feel sorry for those folks.

ljbab728
07-24-2012, 10:38 PM
Don't forget all of the pedestrians that are out every day holding up signs at Hefner Parkway and NW Expressway. LOL
Actually, I had an occasion to be a pedestrian along NW Expressway just a few days ago. I left my car at Hibdons to have some work done and, since I just live about 1/2 mile away, walked home. The main issue I had was having to walk through some wet grass.

NoOkie
07-25-2012, 11:20 AM
The problem with 63rd is the that it crosses into Nichols Hills, a separate municipality that is hostile to sidewalks on its major streets. At least it seems that way, or else 63rd would have been sidewalked a long time ago through that area. This brings up another issue, which is that there are so many self-governing municipalities in the city that would make a coordinated, cohesive, large-scale sidewalk network very difficult. The eastern boundary of Warr Acres on the expressway is the Hideaway Pizza. From there it is only a quarter mile north to the vast Hefner trail network. So my thinking is that by sidewalking the expressway instead of 63rd, you are dealing with Warr Acres instead of Nichols Hills. You would also be giving people access to the 7 day/week bus stop at Penn Square mall.

I actually meant west of Portland, rather than east(I mixed up left and right today, too. Maybe I should sleep more). 63rd has some moderate sidewalk coverage through Warr Acres. There are some gaps, but it's better than a lot of main streets around here. Penn and May up north of 50th make me angry on a regular basis.

LandRunOkie
07-25-2012, 03:03 PM
Don't forget all of the pedestrians that are out every day holding up signs at Hefner Parkway and NW Expressway. LOL

I can't tell if you're trying to suggest that an increase in sidewalks would lead to an increase in crime, but it actually doesn't. This article (http://www.freefilehosting.net/conveniencestoresarmedrobberyandphysicalenviroment alfeatures) shows that convenience stores on streets with a lot of traffic get robbed less than those with less traffic. There is another one that shows the same thing for school vandalism but it hasn't been digitized yet. Its called "Enviromental Correlates of School Vandalism" by Pavel Pablant. So increasing traffic, even "pedestrians" shouldn't lead to an increase in crime.

ljbab728
07-25-2012, 09:47 PM
I can't tell if you're trying to suggest that an increase in sidewalks would lead to an increase in crime, but it actually doesn't. This article (http://www.freefilehosting.net/conveniencestoresarmedrobberyandphysicalenviroment alfeatures) shows that convenience stores on streets with a lot of traffic get robbed less than those with less traffic. There is another one that shows the same thing for school vandalism but it hasn't been digitized yet. Its called "Enviromental Correlates of School Vandalism" by Pavel Pablant. So increasing traffic, even "pedestrians" shouldn't lead to an increase in crime.

LOL, no. I didn't mean that at all. I was just making a "tongue in cheek" comment about the pedestrians that are already there, even without sidewalks. I've never heard anyone connect panhandlers in that area with a rise in crime anyway.

Spartan
07-25-2012, 11:27 PM
I can't tell if you're trying to suggest that an increase in sidewalks would lead to an increase in crime, but it actually doesn't. This article (http://www.freefilehosting.net/conveniencestoresarmedrobberyandphysicalenviroment alfeatures) shows that convenience stores on streets with a lot of traffic get robbed less than those with less traffic. There is another one that shows the same thing for school vandalism but it hasn't been digitized yet. Its called "Enviromental Correlates of School Vandalism" by Pavel Pablant. So increasing traffic, even "pedestrians" shouldn't lead to an increase in crime.

Walkability enhancements would reduce rising crime problems in North OKC (NW Expwy, 122nd, etc), and probably in that high-crime pocket of SW OKC (SW59) too. Those are both terribly auto-centric areas, brutal to pedestrians.