View Full Version : Census Bureau: Oklahoma's Population Growing Faster Than U.S



RealEstateCop1
12-21-2011, 12:21 PM
OKLAHOMA CITY - New estimates released by the Census Bureau show the Oklahoma population grew by more than 40,000 residents between April 2010 and July 2011.

The figures released Wednesday estimate Oklahoma's population to be more than 3,791,000, a gain of 1.0 percent from the official count released a year earlier.

Our neighbor to the south, Texas, gained more people than any other state between April 1, 2010, and July 1, 2011 (529,000), followed by California (438,000), Florida (256,000), Georgia (128,000) and North Carolina (121,000), according to the latest U.S. Census Bureau estimates. Combined, these five states accounted for slightly more than half the nation's total population growth.

Read the U.S. Census news release. (http://www.census.gov/newsroom/releases/archives/population/cb11-215.html)
"These are the first set of Census Bureau population estimates to be published since the official 2010 Census state population counts were released a year ago," said Census Bureau Director Robert Groves. "Our nation is constantly changing and these estimates provide us with our first measure of how much each state has grown or declined in total population since Census Day 2010."

The United States as a whole saw its population increase by 2.8 million over the 15-month period, to 311.6 million.

Its growth of 0.92 percent between April 1, 2010, and July 1, 2011, was the lowest since the mid-1940s.

"The nation's overall growth rate is now at its lowest point since before the baby boom," Groves said.

The Census Bureau report shows Kansas' population grew by more than 18,000 residents between April 2010 and July 2011. The figures estimate the Kansas population to be more than 2,870,000, a gain of 0.6 percent.

The Associated Press contributed to this report.


Here is the link from News9.com (http://www.news9.com/story/16370274/census-bureau-oklahomas-population-growing-faster-than-us-as-a-whole)

Bunty
12-21-2011, 06:00 PM
It's going to be important for Oklahoma to grow to expand the tax base, if Republicans think it's a good idea to get rid of the state income tax.

California is still drawing people like a magnet. People just can't resist the mild year round climate.

bluedogok
12-21-2011, 08:50 PM
We are moving from a no state income tax state to one that has a state income tax, the difference in property taxes more than makes up the difference. Our house in Austin is appraised around $150,000, the taxes due next month are almost $3,100. In looking at flyers I picked one up for an older house in South Denver not knowing what the houses in that neighborhood cost. It was an older home and didn't look too big from the street, evidently it had a full basement and more, about 4,800 sf and they were asking $468,000, the property taxes on it were $2,200. The "no state income tax" thing is nothing more than a ruse, they tax anything and everything else in Texas and if it isn't "taxed" then they fee you to death, sometimes they do both. My overall tax burden (percentage wise) was less living in OKC than it was in Austin.

Bunty
12-21-2011, 11:22 PM
Under state law, it's hard to raise state taxes in Oklahoma, so I don't see legislators trying to raise some state wide tax to use it to replace abolishing the state income tax. That's why the Oklahoma income tax will go away, if it does, gradually and not all at once. I don't think there's much point in Oklahoma to try to imitate a big state like Texas with its tax laws, or whatever. It's huge airports can't be competed against to start with.

dcsooner
12-22-2011, 05:40 AM
Oklahoma needs to first make improvements that will lead to keeping a majority of its young people in State. Far too many young and middle aged leave for Texas and other places because of lack of jobs and cultural vitality. Of course, people leave their home States for others all the time (before someone speaks the obvious) but, I have lived in Indiana,Wisconsin, Texas, GA for a short time and now Virginia (military) and in each, when I hear the discussion of people about their State, yes some young people want to leave but most love their home State and would not really consider living somewhere else Outside the State. Oklahomans seem obsessed with Texas for sure. I would venture to say that a large percentage of posters are living in other States, mostly Texas. If you ask them they will say job or some other reason for living there, but, if most were truthful, they live there because they LIKE it there over their home State. Oklahomans by and large don't have pride in the State. Ask people where they are from and they will proudly announce Texas, New Orleans etc etc. An Oklahoman will almost apologetically say Oklahoma City,Tulsa and for sure my home town Lawton. We like to make excuses like no mountains, oceans etc, but that is not really it, its the mindset of the people in the State about themselves. Fix that and Oklahoma's population can begin to grow to where it should be somewhere in the 4-5M range. My two cents about population

NickFiggins
12-22-2011, 10:47 AM
Really it comes down to a jobs and quality of life. While Oklahoma might be lacking the quality of life (especially in regards to arts and education departments), in a current climate as today, jobs control flows of people. North Dakota is growing not because it is desirable, but because of jobs. I think the most important thing that Oklahoma can do, is control its water supply. If north Texas experiences shortages of water, it will curtail their growth and increase the cost of doing business. Also long term it is very important to make sure that Oklahoma has water security. As someone who currently lives on the east coast, I must say that returning to OK looks very attractive w/ low cost of living and short commute times. Also I have noticed a change in people opinions of the state. While admittedly the majority of east coasters still hold their nose at OK, the fact that many ask me about OK and some even ask about life here, is driven by two things: jobs and the fact that they see OKC Thunder on TV. That said I agree trying to copy Texas is dumb, there are better states to look to for ideas Virginia, North Carolina...two states that reap the rewards of a quality education system.

catch22
12-22-2011, 12:14 PM
As my name suggests, that's where I am. I am a young guy...I want to stay in OKC, I love it here. But most of the higher-up jobs in my industry are out of state. But for example if the front-line work I do now with that company gets laid off, I would be forced to move to a different city to keep my pay and and any niche benefits associated with it. Unfortunately with the amount of years to go until I can retire...I will be laid off or furloughed between now and then. It's the nature of the game. So the catch-22 is if I want to advance further up in the food chain within my industry (particularly the company I am with) I will be forced to move out of state, and the counter-catch is if I want to keep my job (not imminent at the moment, but in the next XX years between now and retirement I will probably get laid off or furloughed one way or another in OKC ), I would also be forced to move out of state (even if temporary).

Nature of the game...

chuck johnson
12-22-2011, 09:13 PM
Oklahoma needs to first make improvements that will lead to keeping a majority of its young people in State. Far too many young and middle aged leave for Texas and other places because of lack of jobs and cultural vitality. Of course, people leave their home States for others all the time (before someone speaks the obvious) but, I have lived in Indiana,Wisconsin, Texas, GA for a short time and now Virginia (military) and in each, when I hear the discussion of people about their State, yes some young people want to leave but most love their home State and would not really consider living somewhere else Outside the State. Oklahomans seem obsessed with Texas for sure. I would venture to say that a large percentage of posters are living in other States, mostly Texas. If you ask them they will say job or some other reason for living there, but, if most were truthful, they live there because they LIKE it there over their home State. Oklahomans by and large don't have pride in the State. Ask people where they are from and they will proudly announce Texas, New Orleans etc etc. An Oklahoman will almost apologetically say Oklahoma City,Tulsa and for sure my home town Lawton. We like to make excuses like no mountains, oceans etc, but that is not really it, its the mindset of the people in the State about themselves. Fix that and Oklahoma's population can begin to grow to where it should be somewhere in the 4-5M range. My two cents about population

I agree with a lot of this and I think most Oklahomans have no idea how many young people leave the state. When I lived in San Francisco, I organized a OU football watch group. During my tenure, the group numbered in the hundreds, mostly recent grads in their 20's to those in their 30's. These were almost all OU grads and almost all grew up in Oklahoma. These were just the ones I could find that were interested in watching OU football. This is not including the grads from OSU, Tulsa, etc and older alum. There are several hundred young educated Oklahomans in the Bay area and even more older alum. There are countless others across the country. Oklahoma is hemorrhaging a lot of brainpower and talent.

As for why so many leave, there are a variety of reasons. There's a natural wanderlust when you're young. No matter where you're from, there's temptation for many to leave. There's a desire to see the world, to test your self, and to see if the grass is greener on the other side. For some it is greener and for some it isn't.

There's the obvious employment opportunities. The economy here is great, but options can be limited depending on your career choice. In some fields it's either a near requirement or highly recommended that you leave. We live in a smaller world, but it's generally a good idea to cut your teeth amongst the best of your field to become the best or ensure your success.

As many that do leave, some return and most never leave. I personally think it's important to leave if for only a little while. I do think OKC has become a far more attractive place to return to and live but still has a long way to go. It's great that the Thunder are here, but basketball is not a year round sport. All the other hallmarks of a great city still need to develop and grow a lot. There's no reason that OKC can't have an art, music, culinary scene that is as vibrant as Austin's. In my opinion, the only thing keeping that type of cultural growth from happening is the number of residents who don't see the value in it and don't actively support those who do try to spur that growth.

Oklahoma City is becoming more ethnically and socially diverse and too many residents see that as a liability as opposed to something to appreciate. I have Asian friends who couldn't believe I was moving back. I have gay friends who I can't believe are moving back. People should be welcomed and celebrated regardless of their ethnicity, or orientation and especially if they contribute to the cultural vitality of the city. The ethnic food here has gotten much better over the past decade as a result of the increased diversity. It's also no secret that in some of the formerly derelict neighborhoods that are now fully restored fabulously, the home owners are "Gary and Todd". Most Oklahoma City residents are very tolerant, but it's time to stop tolerating those differences and time to start celebrating them.

For those who try to make an effort to encourage cultural growth here, it can be daunting and disheartening. I have several friends who work in different facets of arts/music/culinary scene here who feel like they are just banging there heads against a wall. They feel great pride in their efforts and gains made, but they all know they could very easily leave and find a city more appreciative of their efforts. I've been back a little over a year and I'm still on the fence and the only reason there's any doubt in my mind is whether or not I want to go through what they are going through. I want to affect a change no matter where I live, but it would be much easier in a place receptive to change.

I'll probably stay, if only because of an old ad campaign that went somthing along the lines of, "If you love your country, Leave it. Learn everything you can about the world and bring the best of it back."

RodH
12-22-2011, 09:44 PM
Oklahoma gained 8,933 through domestic migration. It ranked 12th among the states, trailing Oregon (13,636) and Arizona (13,150). Texas (145,315) and Florida (118,756) were the top gainers through domestic migration. The big domestic migration losers were Ohio (-44,868), New Jersey (-54,098), Michigan (-57,234), California (-65,705), Illinois (79,458), and New York (113,757).

ljbab728
12-22-2011, 11:09 PM
Oklahoma needs to first make improvements that will lead to keeping a majority of its young people in State. Far too many young and middle aged leave for Texas and other places because of lack of jobs and cultural vitality. Of course, people leave their home States for others all the time (before someone speaks the obvious) but, I have lived in Indiana,Wisconsin, Texas, GA for a short time and now Virginia (military) and in each, when I hear the discussion of people about their State, yes some young people want to leave but most love their home State and would not really consider living somewhere else Outside the State. Oklahomans seem obsessed with Texas for sure. I would venture to say that a large percentage of posters are living in other States, mostly Texas. If you ask them they will say job or some other reason for living there, but, if most were truthful, they live there because they LIKE it there over their home State. Oklahomans by and large don't have pride in the State. Ask people where they are from and they will proudly announce Texas, New Orleans etc etc. An Oklahoman will almost apologetically say Oklahoma City,Tulsa and for sure my home town Lawton. We like to make excuses like no mountains, oceans etc, but that is not really it, its the mindset of the people in the State about themselves. Fix that and Oklahoma's population can begin to grow to where it should be somewhere in the 4-5M range. My two cents about population

dc, I'm not quite sure where to begin with your comments. I understand what you're trying to say but the article was about how Oklahoma was doing relatively well compared to the rest of the states in population gain. Of course there are states growing much faster but it sounds like you think we are doing nothing to improve our desirability or liveability and that just isn't so. I certainly live in Oklahoma and have all of my life. I'm always proud to tell people where I'm from when I travel out of the state or out of the country. When I'm with other Oklahomans they are equally proud. There are other states or cities that I like very much but this is where I want to be for numerous reasons. Maybe you're just not quite as aware of the mindset of Oklahomans as you think you are.

adaniel
12-22-2011, 11:42 PM
Oklahoma gained 8,933 through domestic migration. It ranked 12th among the states, trailing Oregon (13,636) and Arizona (13,150).

Given the fact that movement around the US is at a multi-decade low, this is very good.

adaniel
12-23-2011, 12:34 AM
If you ask them they will say job or some other reason for living there, but, if most were truthful, they live there because they LIKE it there over their home State. Oklahomans by and large don't have pride in the State. Ask people where they are from and they will proudly announce Texas, New Orleans etc etc. An Oklahoman will almost apologetically say Oklahoma City,Tulsa and for sure my home town Lawton. We like to make excuses like no mountains, oceans etc, but that is not really it, its the mindset of the people in the State about themselves. Fix that and Oklahoma's population can begin to grow to where it should be somewhere in the 4-5M range. My two cents about population

Hmmmm. Is it that people in OK don't have any pride in their home state or is it that YOU don't have any pride in your home state?

If you don't, well fair enough. But I think your assessment about people here cowering when they announce where they are from, especially in comparison to other places, is way off.

I'm certainly under no impression that Oklahoma is a sexy place that will impress people when tell them I live here. But I actually get a pretty positive reception nowadays. Case in point: I went to go see some friends in NYC/Tri State area this October. One the plane, a gentleman and his wife began asking me about the Thunder and the Sooners (this was when OU was still #3 btw) when I told him I was from OKC. While having drinks at a bar in Midtown Manhattan a friend of my friend struck up conversation with me about how he heard OKC's economy was one of the best in the nation and how affordable it was in comparison to where he was from (in Long Island). During this conversation another lady in our party who was a Prudential Financial Advisor mentioned that she was thinking of getting licensed in OK due to the strength of our economy.

IMO, I could really care less what complete strangers think about where I'm from. But Oklahoma's reputation has improved partially because people here have rejected your assumption that they should shame themselves when announcing where they are from.

dcsooner
12-23-2011, 05:18 AM
I agree with a lot of this and I think most Oklahomans have no idea how many young people leave the state. When I lived in San Francisco, I organized a OU football watch group. During my tenure, the group numbered in the hundreds, mostly recent grads in their 20's to those in their 30's. These were almost all OU grads and almost all grew up in Oklahoma. These were just the ones I could find that were interested in watching OU football. This is not including the grads from OSU, Tulsa, etc and older alum. There are several hundred young educated Oklahomans in the Bay area and even more older alum. There are countless others across the country. Oklahoma is hemorrhaging a lot of brainpower and talent.

As for why so many leave, there are a variety of reasons. There's a natural wanderlust when you're young. No matter where you're from, there's temptation for many to leave. There's a desire to see the world, to test your self, and to see if the grass is greener on the other side. For some it is greener and for some it isn't.

There's the obvious employment opportunities. The economy here is great, but options can be limited depending on your career choice. In some fields it's either a near requirement or highly recommended that you leave. We live in a smaller world, but it's generally a good idea to cut your teeth amongst the best of your field to become the best or ensure your success.

As many that do leave, some return and most never leave. I personally think it's important to leave if for only a little while. I do think OKC has become a far more attractive place to return to and live but still has a long way to go. It's great that the Thunder are here, but basketball is not a year round sport. All the other hallmarks of a great city still need to develop and grow a lot. There's no reason that OKC can't have an art, music, culinary scene that is as vibrant as Austin's. In my opinion, the only thing keeping that type of cultural growth from happening is the number of residents who don't see the value in it and don't actively support those who do try to spur that growth.

Oklahoma City is becoming more ethnically and socially diverse and too many residents see that as a liability as opposed to something to appreciate. I have Asian friends who couldn't believe I was moving back. I have gay friends who I can't believe are moving back. People should be welcomed and celebrated regardless of their ethnicity, or orientation and especially if they contribute to the cultural vitality of the city. The ethnic food here has gotten much better over the past decade as a result of the increased diversity. It's also no secret that in some of the formerly derelict neighborhoods that are now fully restored fabulously, the home owners are "Gary and Todd". Most Oklahoma City residents are very tolerant, but it's time to stop tolerating those differences and time to start celebrating them.

For those who try to make an effort to encourage cultural growth here, it can be daunting and disheartening. I have several friends who work in different facets of arts/music/culinary scene here who feel like they are just banging there heads against a wall. They feel great pride in their efforts and gains made, but they all know they could very easily leave and find a city more appreciative of their efforts. I've been back a little over a year and I'm still on the fence and the only reason there's any doubt in my mind is whether or not I want to go through what they are going through. I want to affect a change no matter where I live, but it would be much easier in a place receptive to change.

I'll probably stay, if only because of an old ad campaign that went somthing along the lines of, "If you love your country, Leave it. Learn everything you can about the world and bring the best of it back."

You are exactly the type of resident OKC needs. I am returning, but I wil be in my 60's. Thanks for hopefully enlightening our citizens and leaders on the true reasons other than the standard jobs, for citizen flight from the State.

All others, please do not misunderstand, I am very proud of my home State, but some of the points I am trying to make are stifling growth. It is true, some Oklahomans are resistant to growth, diversity, and change. Unless that changes Oklahoma will continue to be considered a place resistant to diversity and change.

My detour away from the initial thread is interesting, but the points have been made and we should return to celebrating the positive growth our State and City are experiencing

Bunty
12-23-2011, 11:36 AM
Maybe Oklahoma Republicans at the State Capitol will forget about Texas and want to imitate what Kansas is doing, led by its governor, whose former position was a very conservative U. S. Senator:
http://www.washingtonpost.com/politics/in-kansas-gov-sam-brownback-puts-tea-party-tenets-into-action-with-sharp-cuts/2011/11/02/gIQAkbnOAP_story.html

Bellaboo
12-23-2011, 12:05 PM
You are exactly the type of resident OKC needs. I am returning, but I wil be in my 60's. Thanks for hopefully enlightening our citizens and leaders on the true reasons other than the standard jobs, for citizen flight from the State.

All others, please do not misunderstand, I am very proud of my home State, but some of the points I am trying to make are stifling growth. It is true, some Oklahomans are resistant to growth, diversity, and change. Unless that changes Oklahoma will continue to be considered a place resistant to diversity and change.

My detour away from the initial thread is interesting, but the points have been made and we should return to celebrating the positive growth our State and City are experiencing

A former highly educated co-worker and good friend of mine left for California when he was in his early 20's. He came back 18 years later and proclaimed how nice the changes are and how he enjoyed living here now.........one of his statements though was 'I hope it doesn't get out about this place, we don't need to be over run with too many people'..............

KayneMo
12-30-2014, 11:01 PM
I didn't want to create another thread on population but this thread's title still pertains to Oklahoma's growth compared to the US.

Nearing 3.9 million residents, Oklahoma grew at a rate slightly faster than the country as a whole at 3.4% and 3.3% respectively. Released a few days ago by the Census, it reports that Oklahoma's July 2014 population estimate is 3,878,000, adding over 126,000 since the 2010 census.

With just under 122,000 people left to hit 4 million and using the rate of people added since 2010 (about 2,479/mo), Oklahoma would hit 4 million people in August 2018.

Oklahoma ranked 23rd in percentage growth and 20th in numerical growth out of the 50 states from 2010-2014.

North Dakota had the greatest percentage growth at 10% since 2010, followed by Texas (7.2%), Colorado (6.5%), Utah (6.5%), and Florida (5.8%).

Texas added the most, nearly 1,811,000 people since 2010, followed by California (+1,548,000), Florida (+1,089,000), Georgia (+408,600), and North Carolina (+408,300).

State Totals: Vintage 2014 - U.S Census Bureau (http://www.census.gov/popest/data/state/totals/2014/index.html)

KayneMo
12-22-2015, 03:38 PM
Oklahoma's population nearing 4 million

According to Census Bureau's July 1, 2015 estimate, Oklahoma's population was 3,911,338. Less than 89,000 to go! The state has gained 160,000 people since the 2010 Census.

Florida crossed 20 million and North Carolina crossed 10 million.

Oklahoma population nears 4 million mark | News OK (http://newsok.com/oklahoma-population-nears-4-million-mark/article/5468298?articleBar=1)

Bunty
12-23-2015, 10:18 PM
Hopefully, low oil prices won't keep it from crossing 4 million by 2020.

Mel
12-23-2015, 11:38 PM
Some of you may live where it's just to full to see the growth but out west of OKC All the land seems to be turning into some type of big business warehouse or a new neighborhood.

White Peacock
12-24-2015, 08:42 AM
Just like several of you, my family is on the fence regarding staying or going. I already left once, moving to Portland for a couple years, and came back largely with the plans to buy a house and live cheaply. I came back in 2007 and since then the city has boomed, but still there are so many elements here that make me want to pack us up and head elsewhere. It's very much a love/hate relationship with the city. I could stay here forever and be content, but I could just as easily go to another state and enjoy what it has to offer. With my wife being an RN, which gives her good job prospects all over the country, this is an increasing reality. If we didn't own a house, we might have already skipped town.

On the flipside, I feel like I would love to contribute toward making OKC better, so sticking around seems worth it as well. Unfortunately, this rapid growth is highly inorganic; there's big money pushing this renaissance, and that makes it so that if you want to prop up a business in any of these up-and-coming neighborhoods, you need considerable capital up front. Rents are high, and your business had better scratch a very obvious itch or the people of the city are likely to walk right past the entrance.

adaniel
12-24-2015, 02:14 PM
On the flipside, I feel like I would love to contribute toward making OKC better, so sticking around seems worth it as well. Unfortunately, this rapid growth is highly inorganic; there's big money pushing this renaissance, and that makes it so that if you want to prop up a business in any of these up-and-coming neighborhoods, you need considerable capital up front. Rents are high, and your business had better scratch a very obvious itch or the people of the city are likely to walk right past the entrance.

Serious question: what examples can you give of a city that is growing more organically, at least in your definition? What city do you think you can start up a business where rents are not high? I'm not picking on you, but I do find this line of thinking to be a bit irksome. It takes money and capital outlays to make it anywhere. And just my anecdotal opinion, but I find people here are much more supportive of local businesses than most places I've lived in.

\

White Peacock
12-24-2015, 04:12 PM
Serious question: what examples can you give of a city that is growing more organically, at least in your definition? What city do you think you can start up a business where rents are not high? I'm not picking on you, but I do find this line of thinking to be a bit irksome. It takes money and capital outlays to make it anywhere. And just my anecdotal opinion, but I find people here are much more supportive of local businesses than most places I've lived in.

\

I'd say most of the cities OKC wants to emulate met their popularity organically. I'm thinking especially of Portland, where the neighborhoods made themselves cool over time as opposed to a developer/investor buying up all the real estate and forcing the commodity of the real estate. That's not happening in PDX now that it's a major hotspot for relocation, but it's what garnered the town its reputation.

As far as rents, I don't know. It's not something I research too deeply; the quoted was just kind of a stream of consciousness on the subject. No need to be irked.

Laramie
12-25-2015, 12:27 PM
.
Will Portland Always Be a Retirement Community for the Young?

http://www.nytimes.com/2014/09/21/magazine/will-portland-always-be-a-retirement-community-for-the-young.html?_r=0

gopokes88
12-25-2015, 12:49 PM
Outside of Okctalk just about no one in this city is aspiring to be Portland. We need to be okc and nothing else.

White Peacock
12-26-2015, 08:51 AM
Outside of Okctalk just about no one in this city is aspiring to be Portland. We need to be okc and nothing else.

The city isn't aspiring to be Portland specifically, necessarily. But it is aspiring to be like any given desirable city toward which the creative class flocks. That includes Portland.

TU 'cane
12-26-2015, 09:36 AM
Make no mistake, Portland and OKC, and Oregon and Oklahoma have been tied at the hip of one another in the population race, with Oregon always holding the advantage. But passed that, I don't think there's much else to compare or debate.

With OKC continuing its growth and seeing Bricktown flourish and the river sports area, etc. it'll keep some young people in town and even draw others perhaps from cities like Austin that have grown too fast and are now too big for many who moved there before the explosion. I definitely think OKC has to continue being the anchor of the state. And while I enjoy the low gas prices and think it's great for all of us common folk, finding a nice median in prices to help the sector get back on track will be a huge benefit for the state. No, I'm not saying I want to see oil prices around $100 a barrel again, but perhaps in the $60-$70 range where the companies can find it profitable but we aren't pulling out loans to fill our cars up. In the meantime, we can keep overusing the cliche term around here about OKC and Tulsa diversifying their industries and hope for the best.

Honestly though, I bet we surpass 4,000,000 before the end of 2018.

We shall see.