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shane453
02-15-2011, 08:32 PM
^^ OK I didn't think that link would work... Here: Go into factfinder, and then you can narrow data selections on the left hand side. Under "Topics > Datasets" choose the 2010 Redistricting Data, and then in the table to the right click the link for "Population and Housing Occupancy Status: 2010 - State -- Place" then when that comes up you can choose Oklahoma in the dropdown menu and it will show you all 700+ towns! This is the only series of steps that I have gotten to work.

Somnio
02-15-2011, 08:38 PM
Maybe Austin will be over 800k?

Austin will probably be a little over 800,000 in the city limits.

It's 2009 estimate was at 786,386, which was a 19,185 increase from it's 2008 estimate.

The average growth per year between 2005-2009 according to the estimates was 19,523, so I'd be surprised if it didn't get at minimum 13,614 between 2009 and 2010, which is all that it would take to reach 800,000.

G.Walker
02-15-2011, 09:06 PM
Given that the census results are from a year ago, I wouldn't doubt that OKC has a population of around 590,000 now...

BG918
02-15-2011, 10:37 PM
That 389,000 estimate (actually 389,625) was for 2009. So, no, 391,906 in 2010 is not better than anyone thought.

Tulsa went from 393,049 in 2000 to 382,457 in 2005. Since 2006 the city has posted minimal gains to get back to 391,906. So I guess above the 2000 number would've been better than many thought but still good to see Tulsa on the upswing population-wise. Once cities start to lose population it's usually hard to reverse decline...see Detroit, Cleveland, Buffalo, St. Louis, etc.

plmccordj
02-16-2011, 04:40 AM
I keep seeing stories all over the Internet and on local TV about Hispanics outnumbering Indians in Oklahoma. I think the bigger story that no one is talking about is that they outnumber blacks in Oklahoma as well. I am not sure why they would omit that piece of information but it seems to be purposely done when you consider that I have been listening for it and hear nothing from any source. I am sorry but I will not use terms like Native American or African American because I think they are politically correct, divisive terms. We are all Americans.

BoulderSooner
02-16-2011, 07:05 AM
I keep seeing stories all over the Internet and on local TV about Hispanics outnumbering Indians in Oklahoma. I think the bigger story that no one is talking about is that they outnumber blacks in Oklahoma as well. I am not sure why they would omit that piece of information but it seems to be purposely done when you consider that I have been listening for it and hear nothing from any source. I am sorry but I will not use terms like Native American or African American because I think they are politically correct, divisive terms. We are all Americans.

it is because Native Americans were the largest minority group ..and now they are no longer

Thunder
02-16-2011, 08:09 AM
http://www.koco.com/news/26885273/detail.html

Sad news. Invasions from Mexico.

lasomeday
02-16-2011, 08:27 AM
We lost 70,000 Native Americans! Wow, I assume those are primarily to deaths instead of moving? I also assume that if we look at the two or more races that more than 75% of those are Native American.

Jesseda
02-16-2011, 08:40 AM
Yes us mexicans, we dont die, we multiply

king183
02-16-2011, 09:04 AM
We lost 70,000 Native Americans! Wow, I assume those are primarily to deaths instead of moving? I also assume that if we look at the two or more races that more than 75% of those are Native American.

Huh? Where in the world do you see that?

The table I'm looking at shows we gained 50,000 Native Americans.

Kerry
02-16-2011, 09:37 AM
For a country that is supposed to be color blind, we seem to make a big deal about color.

plmccordj
02-16-2011, 11:41 AM
For a country that is supposed to be color blind, we seem to make a big deal about color.

That is because the government preaches color blindness to the rest of us while constantly focusing on it. Why does the Census even ask this information?

Kerry
02-16-2011, 12:02 PM
That is because the government preaches color blindness to the rest of us while constantly focusing on it. Why does the Census even ask this information?

If only I could remember who said this:



I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their character.

Jesseda
02-16-2011, 12:30 PM
Please Check one of the following the best describes you

Japanic
Germanic
Chinexican
Africanic Amexican
caucexican
Spirish
Polexican
Mexicottish


This is what the polls will probably be asking in 20 years....

shane453
02-16-2011, 02:14 PM
That is because the government preaches color blindness to the rest of us while constantly focusing on it. Why does the Census even ask this information?

First of all, color blindness is an outdated idea and we have moved on to multiculturalism where differences are embraced and encouraged.

Second, it is obviously useful and interesting to collect this information on your country, especially one as diverse as the US.

king183
02-16-2011, 02:19 PM
First of all, color blindness is an outdated idea and we have moved on to multiculturalism where differences are embraced and encouraged.

Second, it is obviously useful and interesting to collect this information on your country, especially one as diverse as the US.

Multiculturalism? Talk about an outdated idea. Virtually every European country has said it's been a massive failure, creating tiers of second and third class citizens who have no identity outside their ethnic group.

With the Hispanic population growing in Oklahoma and especially in OKC, we need to try to ensure they, and other ethnic groups, are fully integrated into our society.

Jesseda
02-16-2011, 02:31 PM
Well I am 1/2 spanish mixed with irish and indian. so im a spirish.. it is hard to fill anything out because most of us are no longer one race, we are mixed... so how can you truely fill something out.. i wonder if someone is half hispanic and half african american, what would they check when its says check one, Any Hoot, i like the diversity going on here in oklahoma.

shane453
02-16-2011, 02:38 PM
Jess, there is detailed Census data on which mix of races people are. You can see what percent of multiracial people are "White and Black" or "Black and Asian" or any other combination.

As for the "integration" issue, we need to understand that integration doesn't mean they start acting, talking, and thinking like white people. There can be one integrated American culture that reflects the values of its people, but that unified culture is going to be changed significantly by Hispanic immigration, just as it was by European and Asian immigration. Not a bad thing, just makes our society more interesting. So integration would be a natural thing, not something we "make sure of" -- we tried to "make sure" that natives would be integrated, and look at all the rich culture we lost. Now native languages struggle to survive, that's sad.

king183
02-16-2011, 03:45 PM
As for the "integration" issue, we need to understand that integration doesn't mean they start acting, talking, and thinking like white people. There can be one integrated American culture that reflects the values of its people, but that unified culture is going to be changed significantly by Hispanic immigration, just as it was by European and Asian immigration. Not a bad thing, just makes our society more interesting. So integration would be a natural thing, not something we "make sure of" -- we tried to "make sure" that natives would be integrated, and look at all the rich culture we lost. Now native languages struggle to survive, that's sad.

Shane, that's the exact opposite of multiculturalism. That's a "melting pot." If that's what you meant when you said "multiculturalism," then I agree with the sentiment, but not your semantics. (No one suggested they start "thinking like white people.")

Also, integration is NOT something that always naturally happens. All one need do is look to Western Europe for proof of that--which is why the leaders there have said multiculturalism has been a huge failure. There is virtually no integration, especially among Muslim and African immigrants. So many of them are relegated to the slums of the cities. There's a lesson there for Oklahoma when it comes to what our policies will be toward immigrants.

Lastly, you are 95% incorrect that we tried to "make sure" Native were integrated. In fact, we did the exact opposite by putting them on reservations, where they (their culture and their people) stayed and declined in a horrible manner and fashion. My tribe in Minnesota is in truly terrible condition because they never integrated; they just stayed on the reservation--literally so many of them have never stepped a foot outside the boundaries.

We are fortunate in Oklahoma that we don't have what most people think of as reservations. This allowed Native Americans to integrate and even protect much of the culture. It's part of the reason Native Americans in Oklahoma are light years ahead of tribes in other states vis-a-vis some things like education and wealth.

Architect2010
02-16-2011, 09:15 PM
Well I am 1/2 spanish mixed with irish and indian. so im a spirish.

I'm Spanish, Swedish, and German. I think the best way to describe people like us, and there's a vast number of us in the United States, is to simply label us "American".
America is such a melting pot, it only makes sense that this mixing of so many races has created a new average American that identifies with multiples of backgrounds and not just one.

Jesseda
02-17-2011, 07:50 AM
I agree with you, almost all of us has at least two races in us.. They really need to add to that nationality sheet a henz 57 or mutt to the nationality list lol

king183
02-17-2011, 07:57 AM
I'm Spanish, Swedish, and German. I think the best way to describe people like us, and there's a vast number of us in the United States, is to simply label us "American".
America is such a melting pot, it only makes sense that this mixing of so many races has created a new average American that identifies with multiples of backgrounds and not just one.

Yes, yes, yes.

earlywinegareth
02-17-2011, 10:58 AM
Well the geneticists have proven we all migrated out of Africa...some earlier or later than others. That makes you, me, everyone in the USA an African-American.

semisimple
02-17-2011, 01:20 PM
Thanks for posting!I really want to see how some of Americas fastest growing cities did like the ones I metioned!When do the TX and NC figures come out?

Texas data is out.

Dallas-Ft. Worth MSA:
2010: 6,371,773
2000: 5,161,544

Austin MSA:
2010: 1,716,289
2000: 1,249,763

San Antonio MSA:
2010: 2,142,508
2000: 1,711,703

Houston MSA:
2010: 5,946,800
2000: 4,715,407

Individual cities/counties here: http://2010.census.gov/news/xls/cb11cn37_tx_2010redistr.xls

Kerry
02-17-2011, 02:08 PM
So every city in Texas added the equivalent of an OKC in 10 years, except Dallas and Houston - that added two OKCs each.

fromdust
02-17-2011, 06:26 PM
Well I am 1/2 spanish mixed with irish and indian. so im a spirish.. it is hard to fill anything out because most of us are no longer one race, we are mixed... so how can you truely fill something out.. i wonder if someone is half hispanic and half african american, what would they check when its says check one, Any Hoot, i like the diversity going on here in oklahoma.


Well I am 1/2 spanish mixed with irish and indian. so im a spirish.. it is hard to fill anything out because most of us are no longer one race, we are mixed... so how can you truely fill something out.. i wonder if someone is half hispanic and half african american, what would they check when its says check one, Any Hoot, i like the diversity going on here in oklahoma.

3 race of people i can think of. caucasian, negroid, and asian. everybody here just keeps spouting off ethnic groups. sub races like half white and black sure, but irish is not a race neither is mexican.

Kerry
02-17-2011, 06:40 PM
3 race of people i can think of. caucasian, negroid, and asian. everybody here just keeps spouting off ethnic groups. sub races like half white and black sure, but irish is not a race neither is mexican.

Thank you.

BoulderSooner
02-18-2011, 06:48 AM
So every city in Texas added the equivalent of an OKC in 10 years, except Dallas and Houston - that added two OKCs each.

to be fair those were MSA numbers .. so .. dallas and houston only added 1 OKC each ..and the others only a half OKC

G.Walker
02-18-2011, 07:10 AM
I am surprised that Ft. Worth was one of the fastet growing cities in Texas, as they added 206,512 in 10 years!...Given that my family and I visited Ft. Worth last spring and it didn't look that progressive?

JOHNINSOKC
02-18-2011, 08:20 AM
I have to agree with your assessment of Ft. Worth. I think OKC seems more progressive and has a mix of both Dallas and Ft. Worth. The only thing that I think Ft. Worth is ahead of OKC on is the intermodel transit station and more retail in its downtown area. I see OKC becoming more like Dallas over the next few decades.

progressiveboy
02-18-2011, 01:23 PM
I have to agree with your assessment of Ft. Worth. I think OKC seems more progressive and has a mix of both Dallas and Ft. Worth. The only thing that I think Ft. Worth is ahead of OKC on is the intermodel transit station and more retail in its downtown area. I see OKC becoming more like Dallas over the next few decades. Actually Fort Worth is more progressive in the Arts Scene. The Bass Performance Hall in DT Fort Worth is an architectectural icon and amazing acoustics. The OKC Civic Center is second fiddle to Bass Hall however, it is also a nice venue for the Symphony and Ballet. The city is also home to the famous Kimball Art Museum and the Amon Carter Museum both renowed museums. It is also home to the Van Cliburn International piano series which people from all over the country come to see this incredible piano competition. I will say this. OKC is progressing very nicely and continues to elevate itself as a forward thinking city. My wish is that it continues to move forward and become a city where people would want to live and that it attracts major Fortune 500 companies to the area as this brings in new money and revenue source for the city and the State.

semisimple
02-18-2011, 04:09 PM
I recall some articles over the last decade about Ft. Worth annexing a bunch of land. That may have a lot to do with those numbers.

You are right--this is also a factor, although to a lesser extent, for Austin, Houston, and San Antonio.

Here in Austin, there is a significant amount of development in unincorporated areas--Austin and some of its suburbs grow in population by annexing these developed areas. Austin could annex a lot of undeveloped land in its so-called "ETJ" (extraterritorial jurisdiction) and probably grow by several tens of thousands of people. Same with some of the suburbs like Round Rock and Pflugerville.

By contrast OKC (and surrounding cities) already cover so much land that much more of the development occurs in incorporated areas.

dmoor82
02-18-2011, 05:57 PM
Muslim growth growing as well! http://newsok.com/article/3537788

BG918
02-19-2011, 01:10 PM
By contrast OKC (and surrounding cities) already cover so much land that much more of the development occurs in incorporated areas.

OKC picks up a lot of the population where in other cities, due to smaller city areas, that population growth would be in the adjacent suburbs. In Tulsa, for example, the predominant growth pattern has been south and southeast for a long time. Tulsa's city limits only extend so far south and southeast before they become Broken Arrow and Bixby. So while south Tulsa grew tremendously in the 90's that same growth kept going but instead of being in Tulsa it was in the adjacent suburbs.

The metro also started seeing more growth in its southwest suburbs of Jenks and Glenpool, and after the construction of a large shopping center by Hwy 75 in southwest Tulsa was completed in 2007 the city itself has seen new growth in its southwest section adjacent to Jenks. I think that is a large reason why Tulsa proper began gaining population from 2006 on was because of the growth in southwest Tulsa spurred by a stronger local economy than in the early 00's when the metro lost 20,000 jobs. Similar to how Moore and south OKC really began to grow in the late 90's/early 00's due to new retail options in an under-served part of the metro along I-35.

Just like south-southeast was the focus of the 90's and 00's, I think you will see more of a shift toward southwest growth and also north-northwest with Owasso and Skiatook this decade. The southwest growth should help Tulsa as the city has a lot of area in the southwest ripe for development. In OKC I think you will continue to see more growth in south OKC/Moore/north Norman for the foreseeable future. Is there any indication that growth will slow in north OKC/Edmond in favor of more growth in the south metro? I see the west metro continuing its high rate of growth too, what about the east side toward around Midwest City and Choctaw? I also hope that this decade both OKC and Tulsa continue to revitalize their inner cities and bring back more people. Suburban growth is fine but the city is healthier with more people living in existing neighborhoods and urban areas..

G.Walker
02-19-2011, 01:45 PM
I see Norman/Moore area slowing in growth in the next decade, as it is becoming very congested in this area. Look to Mustang/Yukon/El Reno area for fast growth in the next several years, as this area is young and progressive...I see Oklahoma City growing fast for the next 5 years or so, then top out and slow...Choctaw/Harrah/Shawnee area will also see fast growth...Edmond will slow growth...as for Tulsa...I see it suburbs gaining ground on Oklahoma City suburbs...especially in the Broken Arrow/Jenks and Owasso/Claremore areas...

flintysooner
02-19-2011, 02:29 PM
I looked up Moore back to the 1950 census.

I'm not certain the distinction between the town designation and township but both were listed. I'm guessing township might be the better measure for comparison. The designation is not used after 1950.

1930: 1391 (township), 538 (town)
1940: 1347 (township), 499 (town)
1950: 1595 (township), 942 (town)
1960: 1760
1970: 18761
1980: 35063
1990: 40318
2000: 41138
2010: 55081

BG918
02-19-2011, 07:03 PM
I looked up Moore back to the 1950 census.

I'm not certain the distinction between the town designation and township but both were listed. I'm guessing township might be the better measure for comparison. The designation is not used after 1950.

1930: 1391 (township), 538 (town)
1940: 1347 (township), 499 (town)
1950: 1595 (township), 942 (town)
1960: 1760
1970: 18761
1980: 35063
1990: 40318
2000: 41138
2010: 55081

It certainly appears Moore has grown a lot this decade, and the numbers back that up. Same for growth in south OKC adjacent to Moore, and in northwest Norman.

The gain of only 800 between 1990 and 2000 is interesting. I wonder how much the May 3, 1999 tornado affected that number?

windowphobe
02-19-2011, 07:17 PM
In early Oklahoma usage, a "township" was an area six miles square, set off by the appropriate section-line roads; the boundaries for the Moore township - which did not coincide, then or now, with Moore municipal limits - were 89th, Bryant, Indian Hills and May. It comes up short of 36 square miles, mostly because the intersection of Indian Hills and May would be on the wrong side of the Canadian River. The original town of Moore was tiny - maybe eight blocks north to south, six east to west, centered on a Santa Fe railroad station. Today it occupies about 22 square miles, some of which extends farther east than Bryant.

ljbab728
02-19-2011, 11:43 PM
I see Norman/Moore area slowing in growth in the next decade, as it is becoming very congested in this area. Look to Mustang/Yukon/El Reno area for fast growth in the next several years, as this area is young and progressive...I see Oklahoma City growing fast for the next 5 years or so, then top out and slow...Choctaw/Harrah/Shawnee area will also see fast growth...Edmond will slow growth...as for Tulsa...I see it suburbs gaining ground on Oklahoma City suburbs...especially in the Broken Arrow/Jenks and Owasso/Claremore areas...

I really don't understand your reasoning at all. If by congested, you mean that Norman and Moore have seen substantial development in the last few years, you're correct. Both cities, however, have large areas of undeveloped land in their city limits so that should not slow their growth. I agree that the far west side of the metro will continue to see great growth but keep in mind that a large part of that area is in the OKC city limits. Mustang is very limited in area and will likely be close to built out within about 20 years. Their is no reason that OKC should slow down in 5 years mainly due to the farsighted annexation planning in the past and continued infill. OKC won't be choked out by the suburbs as happens in so many metro areas.

Video Expert
02-22-2011, 09:48 AM
I really don't understand your reasoning at all. If by congested, you mean that Norman and Moore have seen substantial development in the last few years, you're correct. Both cities, however, have large areas of undeveloped land in their city limits so that should not slow their growth. I agree that the far west side of the metro will continue to see great growth but keep in mind that a large part of that area is in the OKC city limits. Mustang is very limited in area and will likely be close to built out within about 20 years. Their is no reason that OKC should slow down in 5 years mainly due to the farsighted annexation planning in the past and continued infill. OKC won't be choked out by the suburbs as happens in so many metro areas.

I agree with you. One should drive on US 75 North from the High-5 in North Dallas to Allen...that's the definition of "congested". Even with all the recent retail and housing growth along I-35 in the last 3-4 years or so, the area between Moore and Norman is still almost rural in comparison.

kevinpate
02-23-2011, 07:41 PM
... Even with all the recent retail and housing growth along I-35 in the last 3-4 years or so, the area between Moore and Norman is still almost rural in comparison.

Quite by design. Now, east and west, especially east, that's another matter entirely

redland
02-26-2011, 04:09 PM
The 2010 metropolitan statistical area populations have not been publlished yet. But for Oklahoma all 2010 county populations have been published on the U.S. Census website. By addiing the populations of the consiituent counties, Oklhoma City's MSA population is 1,259,000, and the combined CMSA population (adding Pottawatomie county) is 1,328,000. These figures could be off by 1,000 since I rounded to the nearest thousand before adding. For Tulsa the MSA is 938,000, and the CMSA (adding Washington County) is 989,000.

OKCRT
02-26-2011, 05:54 PM
I get total MSA at 1,337,463. This includes Grady,McLain,Canadian,Lincoln,Logan,Pott,Kingfishe r,Clev.& Ok. counties.

redland
02-26-2011, 07:51 PM
Kingfishe County has not been part of OKC's MSA in the past and the list of constituent counties on the cenesus web set does not list it. If it were to be included, then the total I cited above would of course be short. Pott County is not a part of the MSA but is included in the CMSa.

betts
02-26-2011, 08:04 PM
Why would Kingfisher not be a part of the MSA when Shawnee is? It seems to me, especially with the Kilpatrick Turnpike, that Kingfisher feels like it is as much a part of the metropolitan area as Shawnee is.

ed: Whoops, sorry, I saw your Pottawatamie info above and forgot that was the Shawnee county.

dmoor82
02-26-2011, 08:06 PM
I agree betts but it's not.NorthWest OKC and Piedmont feel closer than MWC and Choctaw do to Shawnee!

dmoor82
02-26-2011, 08:07 PM
Ofcourse Shawnee has what 20-30k!compared to Kingfishers 10k?

redland
02-27-2011, 05:44 AM
The counties in OKC's MSA (metropolitan statistical area) are these: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, McLain, Grady, Logan, Lincoln. These can be found on the Census Bureau websit.e Pott County, which is a micropolian county in its own right, is added to form the CMSA (combined MSA). Kingfisher County is not included.
The Bureau uses a rather complicated set of data to decide which counties are included. The real weakness I think is that they use only entire counies, never taking just part of a county. For instance, Chickasha make some sense as part of the OKC MSA, but Apache and other communiites in the far south of the county do not (to me). And in Tulsa, Osage County is in the MSA. Surely the southern part of that county is part of the Tulsa metro (extending to only a few miles from downtown Tulsa), but the northern part of that huge county is another matter. Incidentally, the counties in Tulsa's MSA areTulsa, Osage, Creek, OKmulgee, Rogers, Wagner, Pwnee. Then Washington County (Bartlesville) is added to form the CMSA.

redland
02-27-2011, 07:08 AM
My original numbers were somewhat inflated because of rounding (I should have noticed that nearly every county rounded UP). Using the raw numbers, no rounding, the population of the OKc MSA comes to 1,252,987 and the population of the CMSA is 1,322,424.

BG918
02-27-2011, 11:20 AM
The counties in OKC's MSA (metropolitan statistical area) are these: Oklahoma, Cleveland, Canadian, McLain, Grady, Logan, Lincoln. These can be found on the Census Bureau websit.e Pott County, which is a micropolian county in its own right, is added to form the CMSA (combined MSA). Kingfisher County is not included.
The Bureau uses a rather complicated set of data to decide which counties are included. The real weakness I think is that they use only entire counies, never taking just part of a county. For instance, Chickasha make some sense as part of the OKC MSA, but Apache and other communiites in the far south of the county do not (to me). And in Tulsa, Osage County is in the MSA. Surely the southern part of that county is part of the Tulsa metro (extending to only a few miles from downtown Tulsa), but the northern part of that huge county is another matter. Incidentally, the counties in Tulsa's MSA areTulsa, Osage, Creek, OKmulgee, Rogers, Wagner, Pwnee. Then Washington County (Bartlesville) is added to form the CMSA.

Very true about Osage County. The northern towns like Shidler and Foraker are next to Kansas over 1.5 hours from Tulsa. If all of Osage County is included so should Muskogee and Payne counties. And in the OKC metro so should Kingfisher and Carter counties.

HOT ROD
02-28-2011, 02:15 AM
I think it will be interesting if they do redraw the OKC and Tulsa MSA/CSA's.

I think that for OKC, Shawnee really is part of the MSA; Kingfisher County just seems like a natural. Payne County should be part of the CSA, since Stillwater is an OKC exurb.

For Tulsa, Im not really sure I would include Washington County as Tulsa's MSA (and CSA is somewhat debatable but to me it too is a stretch), but it does seem like Muskogee should be part of the CSA since the two seem well connected. ...

I do agree with the weirdness of including an entire county in MSA/CSA calculations. Totall agree that S Grady, NW half of Kingfisher and most of Pattawattame County just does not seem like OKC metro. Even the entire Lincoln county seems a bit of a stretch to me. Osage definitely qualifies but Im not really sure it adds much population, Im not sure about the other Tulsa counties (other than Washington/Bartlesville seems to be a stretch, not well connected to Tulsa IMO, whereas Muskogee is. ...).

Will be interesting if they decide to make Payne County the newest micropolitan area and if they give it to OKC CSA. I definitely think Stillwater is an OKC exurb, but I can also see the argument that the Eastern Payne could belong to Tulsa, however not sure there's much people there. ....

BG918
02-28-2011, 08:42 AM
I think it will be interesting if they do redraw the OKC and Tulsa MSA/CSA's.

I think that for OKC, Shawnee really is part of the MSA; Kingfisher County just seems like a natural. Payne County should be part of the CSA, since Stillwater is an OKC exurb.

For Tulsa, Im not really sure I would include Washington County as Tulsa's MSA (and CSA is somewhat debatable but to me it too is a stretch), but it does seem like Muskogee should be part of the CSA since the two seem well connected. ...

I do agree with the weirdness of including an entire county in MSA/CSA calculations. Totall agree that S Grady, NW half of Kingfisher and most of Pattawattame County just does not seem like OKC metro. Even the entire Lincoln county seems a bit of a stretch to me. Osage definitely qualifies but Im not really sure it adds much population, Im not sure about the other Tulsa counties (other than Washington/Bartlesville seems to be a stretch, not well connected to Tulsa IMO, whereas Muskogee is. ...).

Will be interesting if they decide to make Payne County the newest micropolitan area and if they give it to OKC CSA. I definitely think Stillwater is an OKC exurb, but I can also see the argument that the Eastern Payne could belong to Tulsa, however not sure there's much people there. ....

Stillwater is as much an OKC exurb as it is to Tulsa. It would be difficult for either MSA to justify having Payne County included. Washington County and Bartlesville are very much a part of Tulsa's MSA. There are a good number of ConocoPhillips employees that live in the suburbs north of Tulsa (Skiatook, Owasso, Collinsville) and commute to Bartlesville 30 min. to the north. Downtown Tulsa to Bartlesville is about 45 min via US 75. Downtown Tulsa to Muskogee is about 50 min. but there are likely less commuters between Muskogee and Tulsa, which could be why it's not part of the MSA/CSA. If any changes were made I would think Washington would be part of the Tulsa MSA with Muskogee part of the CSA. Payne could go either way but likely remains independent from OKC and Tulsa as it probably should for now.

shane453
03-02-2011, 02:43 PM
I tried to zoom in on downtown, and see how the population changes have occurred. Right now there isn't anything really great available to visualize Census Tract Data for Oklahoma, but I took some of the raw data and the maps from Census 2000 and came up with the following numbers.

This is a 3.2 square mile area approximately bounded by 13th, Lincoln, Western, and the River. It may include the population of the jail?

2000 Population: 5441
2010 Population: 6639

Raw Change: 1198
% Change: 22%
2010 Population Density: 2,075/sq mi

So all in all, the commercial core gained about 1,200 new residents.

Most of this growth (about 500) occurred in Census Tract 1032 which contains the Legacy and Park Harvey apartments.

Pete
03-02-2011, 02:56 PM
Thanks for the analysis, Shane!

Legacy alone has 303 units and Park Harvey 164.

All in all, downtown alone has added almost 800 housing units since 2000 and pretty much all of that happened in the last few years.

redland
03-15-2011, 07:40 PM
For comparison purposes, here are the population figures for Oklahoma City SMA and the SMA's of other cities in neighboring states.
Dallas-Ft.Worth 5,161,544, +1,124,100, +22%. St. Louis 2,812,888, +114,201, +4%. Kansas City 2,035,312, +199,274, +11%. Austin 1,718,289, +466,538, +37%. Oklahoma City 1,252,987, +157,566, +14%. New Orleans 1,167,764, -167,764, -13%. Tulsa 937,478, +77,946, +9%. Albuquerque 887,077, +157,428, +22%. Omaha 865,340, +98,309, +13%. Little Rock 689,312, +78,934, +13%. Colorado Springs 645,312, +108,129, _20%. Wichita 623,061, +51,895, +9%. Fayetteville AR 463,204, +116,159, +33%. Springfield MO 436,712, +68,338, +19%. Ft. Smith AR 298,592, +25,420, +9%. Amarillo 249,881, +23,359, +10%. Laston 124,098, +9,102, +8%.

Bunty
03-16-2011, 08:43 AM
Will be interesting if they decide to make Payne County the newest micropolitan area and if they give it to OKC CSA. I definitely think Stillwater is an OKC exurb, but I can also see the argument that the Eastern Payne could belong to Tulsa, however not sure there's much people there. ....

Stillwater is already considered in a micropolitan area that is made up of at least 74,000 people, or the population of Payne County. An exurb is such a vague term and doesn't seem fitting for a city, such as Stillwater, because up to 85% of the people both live and work there. Eastern Payne County only has about 10,000 people in it.

Kerry
03-16-2011, 09:33 AM
I tried to zoom in on downtown, and see how the population changes have occurred. Right now there isn't anything really great available to visualize Census Tract Data for Oklahoma, but I took some of the raw data and the maps from Census 2000 and came up with the following numbers.

This is a 3.2 square mile area approximately bounded by 13th, Lincoln, Western, and the River. It may include the population of the jail?

2000 Population: 5441
2010 Population: 6639

Raw Change: 1198
% Change: 22%
2010 Population Density: 2,075/sq mi

So all in all, the commercial core gained about 1,200 new residents.

Most of this growth (about 500) occurred in Census Tract 1032 which contains the Legacy and Park Harvey apartments.

That would make the OKC urban core the fastest growing residential area in the state. 22% growth rate is nothing to sneeze at. That will help with my business plan. Thank you.

Steve, you should do a story on the growth rate.

BG918
03-16-2011, 11:37 AM
Stillwater is already considered in a micropolitan area that is made up of at least 74,000 people, or the population of Payne County. An exurb is such a vague term and doesn't seem fitting for a city, such as Stillwater, because up to 85% of the people both live and work there. Eastern Payne County only has about 10,000 people in it.

That is why I doubt either the OKC or Tulsa metros can claim it, nor should they. It's its own entity halfway between the two metros. The same goes for Enid, Lawton, and to a lesser extent, Ardmore and their respective counties (Garfield, Comanche, Carter). Though cities like Shawnee in the OKC CSA and Bartlesville in the Tulsa CSA could very well be part of the metro. If there were any counties added to the MSA in OKC I would add Kingfisher and maybe Pottawatomie. If any counties were added in Tulsa I imagine it would be Muskogee and maybe Pawnee. I don't think either metro can justify adding any other counties

redland
03-16-2011, 02:51 PM
Pawnee County is already a part of Tulsa's MSA

BG918
03-16-2011, 03:06 PM
Pawnee County is already a part of Tulsa's MSA

You're right, I was thinking Okfuskee County SW of Tulsa.