View Full Version : St. Anthony Hospital



Patrick
09-09-2004, 10:24 PM
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I'm glad to see St. Anthony starting there expansion project. I'm also glad they decided to stay downtown. Not having them downtown sure would've left a hole in the downtown renaissance.

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"St. Anthony removes obstacle to expansion
by Ted Streuli
The Journal Record
9/9/2004



Bricks and mortar tumbled to the ground Wednesday morning as St. Anthony Hospital took a major step toward expanding its midtown Oklahoma City campus.
A demolition crew turned the 9,120-square-foot, 56-year-old Taber building to rubble, making way for a 100,000-square-foot medical office at 519 NW Ninth St.

Steve Hunter, president of St. Anthony's parent company, SSM Healthcare of Oklahoma, said renovating the Taber Building would have cost substantially more than a new building.

"It's not set up," Hunter said. "You just can't work within the bounds of the walls."

The health care company bought the property in July for $425,000 after leasing the building for several years. The new project is expected to cost $10 million to $12 million.

"We're growing," Hunter said. "We were out of physician office space."

St. Anthony spokeswoman Sandra Payne said the new building, scheduled to open in about two years, would provide office space for about 50 doctors.

"I hate to see it torn down," said Mary Stucks, manager of The Century, an apartment building across Ninth Street. "It's been here a long time."

Stucks said she wasn't concerned about noise or disorder resulting from the project.

"I don't know how much longer this (structure) will be here anyway," she said. "I'm not worried about it."

The new office building will be part of a substantial overhaul to St. Anthony, the result of a 2003 agreement with the city that will define the boundaries of the 30-acre campus, improve traffic flow, add landscaping and encourage revitalization of the deteriorating neighborhood. The hospital also plans a $30 million addition to its outpatient building that will create space for operating rooms. Another small St. Anthony's building at Ninth and Walker is scheduled for demolition, but no date has been set.

"I think it will all come together," Payne said. "As it happens it will create interest in business coming down here."

Pete
07-19-2005, 08:21 AM
I keep reading that a "campus plan" has been developed for St. Anthony's and it's been approved by OKC leaders.

But I've yet to see any sort of site plans/renderings/schematics, and here's what their contact person had to say in a returned email message:




"There aren't any renderings per se at this point. If you live in the area or travel by you will note that we are building on top of the hospital on the east side. That is where the new OR is going. The block across the street to the east will be developed into a much more attractive and convenient parking/entry, but we have no specific renderings. Our plan is to introduce generous landscaping to soften and shade the lot, as well as provide visible entryways and traffic flow guides to enhance efficiency.

Beyond that we are working with a team to develop a true campus plan with potential locations for new buildings (if and when they are needed) and enhancing landscaping, streetscaping and traffic flow. I doubt that will be ready much before the first of the year. "



Just thought some of you might be interested. Hopefully, we'll see some drawings early next year.

Pete
05-18-2006, 08:12 AM
St. Anthony to break ground on new office building: Lease-to-buy deal offered to tenants
by Jerry Shottenkirk
The Journal Record

5/18/2006 OKLAHOMA CITY - St. Anthony Hospital will break ground at 10 a.m. Friday on its future Medical Office Building at NW Ninth Street, between Dewey Avenue and Walker Avenue. As it does so, it is also presenting future tenants with an exclusive offering.

St. Anthony Hospital President Joe Hodges said the hospital is working with the Minnesota-based Frauenshuh Healthcare Real Estate Solutions and is offering physicians the opportunity to invest in a "Physicians Leasing and Ownership" program.

"We are providing an investment opportunity for physicians so that they can become equity owners in the building," Hodges said. "We did a national search for a real estate developer who specializes in medical office buildings and who would give equity ownership to the physicians. It's a nice partnership with Frauenshuh Healthcare Real Estate Solutions."

He said Frauenshuh Healthcare Real Estate Solutions was successful with a similar facility in St. Louis, and that is one reason St. Anthony Hospital decided to work with them.

"They gave us the best deal for our physicians," Hodges said.

A published report stated that the 80,000-square-foot Medical Office Building is scheduled for completion in the summer of 2007. The four-story $15 million building will house an Imaging Center, the Rapp Foundation Education Center and physicians' offices. The building is a part of the new St. Anthony Hospital Campus Plan that will be completed over the course of the next 10 years.

"The Medical Office Building is important for St. Anthony because there is such an excitement and energy in Midtown that we don't have any more room," he said. "We want St. Anthony's physicians to move onto our campus, but there was no more office space. Our hospital will lease 20,000 square feet for our new education center."

Hodges said the education center will have an outdoor view overlooking downtown Oklahoma City.

"We'll lease out the space to community groups who can come and have a community event," he said. "It will hold 500 people. We'll use the space for continuing computer education for staff and physicians and for continuing education for our nurses and for orientations."

The hospital is working on providing patients with more street-level parking and cover access for physicians and patients throughout the campus, in addition to exploring a vendor relationship in an effort to provide a coffee-deli bar at the Medical Office Building.

Hodges said St. Anthony Hospital's campus is more than a million square feet and takes up nearly four square blocks. While the hospital will continue to own the land where the new office building is located, it will not own the building.

"This is an exciting time for Oklahoma City and Midtown in particular," he said. "In five years, I don't believe people will be able to recognize what happened on St. Anthony's campus and the surrounding area."

The builder of the St. Anthony Medical Office Building is the Flintco Companies, and the architect is ADG - Architectural Design Group

Richard Wicka, executive vice president of Frauenshuh Healthcare Real Estate Solutions, said tenants of the St. Anthony Medical Office Building are now being offered ownership in the building, even before it is built.

"Tenants step in upon the completion of the building," Wicka said. "Our structure offers anyone who occupies space at the building the option to buy a percentage of the building equal to the space they lease divided by total footage. We're working on finalizing leases with a handful of physicians."

He said about 15 to 20 doctors will be able to lease space to own, but he was unable to discuss the price per square foot.

"We do health-care real estate nationwide," Wicka said. "It's at its peak right now. This is our first project in Oklahoma City. It is difficult for our competitors, who are usually institutional players, to be as flexible," Wicka said.

He said the Physicians Leasing and Ownership program allows great hospitals to attract talented physicians and to situate them on campus.

Founded in 1898, St. Anthony Hospital is a 615-bed tertiary care facility specializing in cardiology, oncology, surgery and behavioral medicine.

The Old Downtown Guy
05-21-2006, 08:55 AM
This new office building along with the recently completed addition to the east side of the adjacent hospital building are the main elements that will relocate the primary entrance for the hospital from the old Dewey entrance on the west. The hospital plans to add some surface parking and a lot of landscaped area between the new building and the new 10th and Walker round-a-bout.

Also, Saint Anthony has agreed to maintain the landscaping of the new round-a-bout, but unfortunately, the city has not done a very good job of getting the landscaping in shape to hand its care off to Saint's. Weeds need to be removed, a few trees need to be replaced and a little truck traffic damage to the planting beds repaired. Hopefully, that will take place soon, so that the investment in the area doesn't suffer a set back.

Flatlander
05-29-2006, 01:53 PM
This is really cool,I wish I lived nearby I would help keep the weeds pulled.Where are the neighborhood assn. people?OKC ROCKS

Spartan
07-10-2010, 01:16 AM
Does anyone know what is going on at the large construction site that just broke ground at 10th and Shartel? It's on the SW corner of the traffic circle there.

I am aware of plans for a new medical office building in that area and for another St Anthony's expansion phase, might have been a new emergency ward or something else, so if it's one of these that would be cool. I can imagine a new emergency ward would be a good use of that site because of it's great access to Classen being on the other side of the traffic circle.

Whatever it is, I just hope it is attractive and urban..and adds to MidTown. We do need to worry more about the area behind St. Anthony's because it seems like the majority of MidTown Renaissance housing is starting to cluster west of the Walker Circle, along Shartel, Francis, etc.

mheaton76
07-10-2010, 05:11 PM
Does anyone know what is going on at the large construction site that just broke ground at 10th and Shartel? It's on the SW corner of the traffic circle there.

Hey Nick, the construction is a stone's throw from my apartment. I've been really curious too - no sign is currently posted. I'll keep an eye out and will post something here when I find anything out.

MIKELS129
07-10-2010, 08:54 PM
It's a dialysis clinic.

mheaton76
07-11-2010, 09:44 AM
Well that's not terribly exciting...

Spartan
07-11-2010, 10:39 AM
Well, it is a downtown-area vacant lot being developed, hopefully out to the street. Did the design go to DDRC or is Shartel not included?

ljbab728
07-11-2010, 11:39 PM
Well that's not terribly exciting...

For people needing dialysis it may be very exciting news.

Rover
07-12-2010, 08:10 AM
I agree ljbab.

Sometimes people forget that development is for the improvement of life. Buildings serve people and are not just pieces of art. I am glad there is so much medical investment in the area downtown. That will draw people near to be close to the services.

Spartan
07-12-2010, 08:24 AM
Buildings serve people and are not just pieces of art.

Care to extrapolate on this?

SkyWestOKC
07-12-2010, 11:39 AM
I think he means that the first purpose of buildings are to serve people and their uses. Any beauty that comes with it is a bonus. See Devon Tower, it's purpose is not to sit empty and look beautiful. It's purpose is to add efficiency to Devon by having everyone in the same building -- the beauty of the building is just an extra feature.

Spartan
07-12-2010, 11:43 AM
They have office space right now.

SkyWestOKC
07-12-2010, 11:47 AM
But they are scattered and not in the same building. That's not the point, keep your eye on the ball, Nick. Buildings = purpose first, beauty second.

Spartan
07-12-2010, 11:50 AM
So what is the functional necessity of a building downtown, then?

rcjunkie
07-12-2010, 11:56 AM
So what is the functional necessity of a building downtown, then?

Why argue just for the sake of arguing ?

Spartan
07-12-2010, 12:10 PM
Well, I'm not arguing. I hope a point I'm waiting to make..just waiting for someone to finish the point that was made offhand a few posts ago.

Rover
07-12-2010, 08:04 PM
Though this thread has just become a place for people to argue, I can't help posting. It is like watching a car wreck and going back to see it a second time. I swear if a kid helped an old lady across the street someone would argue over whether the boy was wearing the right clothes for the job. Someone else would argue that it was disrespectful to the lady. Another one would want a toll to go to the city for the use of the street. Another would want to run them both over because it was a public street and they ought to have the right to drive however the heck they want. And on, and on, and on.

Spartan
07-12-2010, 10:25 PM
Though this thread has just become a place for people to argue, I can't help posting. It is like watching a car wreck and going back to see it a second time. I swear if a kid helped an old lady across the street someone would argue over whether the boy was wearing the right clothes for the job. Someone else would argue that it was disrespectful to the lady. Another one would want a toll to go to the city for the use of the street. Another would want to run them both over because it was a public street and they ought to have the right to drive however the heck they want. And on, and on, and on.

Is this one of your developer jokes that you have saved up for tense negotiating moments?

CuatrodeMayo
07-13-2010, 08:39 AM
Here is a good read...


An ancient Roman architect named Vitruvius wrote that a building must be considered "with due reference to function, structure, and beauty" (Utilitas, Firmitas, and Venustas in his original Latin). This is an exquisite formulation; for all its antiquity it remains a useful framework for the preliminary analysis of a building. Vitruvius gave us the ABC of architecture.

http://www.nytimes.com/books/first/o/ogorman-abc.html

Rover
07-13-2010, 08:55 AM
"Is this one of your developer jokes that you have saved up for tense negotiating moments?"

Mock if you want. Only on this board are we more worried about the brick on the building than celebrating the fact that a new dialysis center will help improve many lives.

I am glad the medical center is adding needed services. Convenient and available services are magnets for drawing people to an area. Adding more gets more people to midtown and that is good.

Steve
07-13-2010, 11:01 AM
Why argue just for the sake of arguing ?

Because this is the life blood of OKC Talk! (Geez I'm glad it's back!)

Spartan
07-13-2010, 12:40 PM
"Is this one of your developer jokes that you have saved up for tense negotiating moments?"

Mock if you want. Only on this board are we more worried about the brick on the building than celebrating the fact that a new dialysis center will help improve many lives.

For the record, in case others are taken aback, I was clearly joking with Rover with the above post. As for improving many lives, it's just a business. People go to med school, they graduate, they started businesses. A lot of people start businesses that improve lives. The Community Foundation's new building, despite being for a charity, is also not above urban design critiques.

Now, the point I was going to make is that when critiquing a building's urban design merits, WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR A LOT. In fact, we are asking that developers TAKE OFF the suburban bells and whistles. No, you don't need an enormous parking lot..even if a lot of people need dialysis. You don't need to waste land with a setback, even if people needing dialysis have something against the street. And so on.. often the most functional design IS the most urban design. Urban design IS seeking to maximize functionality with the surrounding environment, while suburban design is seeking to minimize functionality with the surrounding environment.

I just hope we don't end up with a ranch-style medical building.

And let me point out that we would not even be arguing over this (because we have seen NO renderings) if the anti-urbanists hadn't automatically seeked out the tension.

ljbab728
07-13-2010, 10:42 PM
Now, the point I was going to make is that when critiquing a building's urban design merits, WE ARE NOT ASKING FOR A LOT. In fact, we are asking that developers TAKE OFF the suburban bells and whistles. No, you don't need an enormous parking lot..even if a lot of people need dialysis. You don't need to waste land with a setback, even if people needing dialysis have something against the street. And so on.. often the most functional design IS the most urban design. Urban design IS seeking to maximize functionality with the surrounding environment, while suburban design is seeking to minimize functionality with the surrounding environment.

I just hope we don't end up with a ranch-style medical building.

And let me point out that we would not even be arguing over this (because we have seen NO renderings) if the anti-urbanists hadn't automatically seeked out the tension.

I agree, Spartan. There is no reason that the building can't be both functional and esthetically pleasing. Hopefully there won't be any eventual reason for concern.

Spartan
08-07-2010, 06:15 PM
The building does definitely seem to have a significant setback, which is EXACTLY what the Medical Business District Masterplan recommends against for this area. Another neighborhood on the back burner (or no burner at all)..

liirogue
08-07-2010, 08:55 PM
Fresenius Medical currently has a dialysis location in St. Anthony's hospital. They are building a stand-alone clinic in that location and will be moving out of the hospital.

Architect2010
08-07-2010, 11:29 PM
Spartan. Did you see construction or renderings? That's too bad it has a significant setback.

Spartan
08-08-2010, 02:36 AM
Well you can see the foundation right there. Even better than a site plan.

mheaton76
08-22-2010, 11:07 AM
Here's a view of the site as of today, not a lot to see right now. It does have a massive setback from what I can tell. We'll see how it looks as it's framed up - hopefully it won't be a ranchtastrophe.


http://gallery.me.com/mikey1976#100053/DSC_0002&bgcolor=black

http://gallery.me.com/mikey1976/100053/DSC_0002/web.jpg?ver=12824984040001

metro
08-23-2010, 03:35 PM
you heard it first though with Spartan.

krisb
08-23-2010, 11:20 PM
Urban design, in its purest form, is built for humans. Suburban design is built for cars. Think of the most people-friendly cities and small towns in the world...did you picture a quaint village with people mingling in the piazza, or a huge parking lot?

Larry OKC
08-24-2010, 01:11 AM
its all built for humans..the difference is their means of transportation...this is like guns don't kill people, people kill people...do you think those cars got out to the burbs and commute on their own? No, people drive them.

krisb
08-24-2010, 10:16 PM
And some forms of transportation are healthier, more sustainable, and facilitate more meaningful interactions with other human beings.

Spartan
08-24-2010, 10:26 PM
its all built for humans..the difference is their means of transportation...this is like guns don't kill people, people kill people...do you think those cars got out to the burbs and commute on their own? No, people drive them.

One of the more interesting contrary points I've heard. Of course, cars/guns make it all possible on a whole new level, but you're right--human laziness should never be underestimated. Not ever.

Larry OKC
08-24-2010, 10:27 PM
I agree to a point, but "sustainability" is part of the problem...it is cheaper to build a surface parking lot than a structured one...then it comes down to asthetics as well, is a surface lot really that more unattractive than a parking garage? Most parking garages are not exactly in the "attractive" category (IMO)

Guess the answer is to ban all parking lots, ban "unhealthy" transportation choices (like we have banned drive thru's in Bricktown)...require everyone to live/shop/work in the same area???

OKC@heart
08-25-2010, 12:01 AM
Larry do yourself a favor and do a Google search on some of the innovations that are being applied to parking garages that either conceal them, wrap them in Retail and other techniques that actually make them a part of the urban fabric that can enhance an area rather than an eyesore as so many older ones were. Incidentally there are many older ones that have been dressed up and look great.

the following are some links that have some quick examples:
http://raisingtheroof.blogs.nytimes.com/
http://www.enlightermagazine.com/projects/cardiff-bay-light-bureau
http://www.cambridgearchitectural.com/Project.aspx?ID=11

Larry OKC
08-25-2010, 12:27 AM
Point taken and I have never said that they couldn't be made more attractive. Wrapping them in retail is an option 9was presented as one for the exterior of the new Convention Center). i like the idea. That said, the same is true for surface parking. If not mistaken City code requires a certain amount of landscaping etc for any surface lots. Some developers may do the minimum required by law, others may exceed.

Question is, is this development in the CBD (the "Urban" part of the City)? Now if this was being proposed in the area of the SandRidge development, I would be right there with you.

Are you suggesting that any new development anywhere in the City limits be "Urban" (New York City skyscrapers)?

OKC@heart
08-25-2010, 09:54 AM
Absolutely not, as this would not be feasible or necessary. In the metro area special consideration should be given to projects that require substantial parking and in such instances definately the more appropriate solution longterm is structured parking. There are ways that the developer if savy enough can offset his costs by sharing parking with adjacent users for fee, or supply contracted rates to local businesses in the area who wouldn't have had those opportunities otherwise. As you get more into the suburbs where the density is much reduced smaller shopping centers should not be required to take parking verticle, but they should be required to do things such as employ permeable lots to reduce runnoff, add reflective coatings to the surface to reduce the heat island effect, have sufficient lanscaping etc. to try an minimize the impact.

Pete
02-08-2011, 11:29 AM
Just saw this on a construction site:

"Site work and new construction of two medical office buildings in Oklahoma City. Completed working drawings call for two 56,630-square-foot buildings to include medical space, storage space, restrooms, and office space. Estimated cost: $12,000,000."

Doug Loudenback
02-08-2011, 11:32 AM
Where did you see the sign, Pete?

Pete
02-08-2011, 11:33 AM
Doug, by 'site' I meant website. They were seeking construction bids and listed start date as December of 2010.

Have no idea if this is under construction yet but it was awarded to Flintco.

G.Walker
02-08-2011, 12:05 PM
Med district area maybe?

Pete
02-08-2011, 12:06 PM
These two buildings will be directly adjacent to St. Anthony's, just not sure exactly where.

Spartan
02-09-2011, 08:39 AM
I believe St. Anthony's has had a mid-rise in the works, and I think there's also still the group of physicians that were planning to do a mid-rise that would be a doctor's office building. It has been so under-reported on that it's not even worth speculating on, though, unless someone with some reporting prowess sees this and asks around, tries to get a rendering, etc.

Hopefully we'll get to find out about it before they apply for a city permit, although if Chesapeake is any indication, don't count on that....

BoulderSooner
06-19-2011, 12:05 PM
http://newsok.com/oklahoma-citys-st.-anthony-hospital-has-midtowns-thanks-for-progress/article/3578173?custom_click=headlines_widget

story about st anthony and the impact in all of midtown ... but they throw in at the end plans for another 4 or 5 story office building around 10th and walker at 100,000 sqst

Pete
06-19-2011, 12:17 PM
Yes, I meant to point this out so we can keep our eyes open for this:


Coming is another office building, 100,000 square feet and four or five stories, near NW 10 and Walker. St. Anthony will own the new building and is reviewing several architect's proposals

Government subsidies are always controversial but the incentives given St. Anthony to stay put several years ago will go down as one of the best investments OKC has ever made.

Pete
09-07-2012, 12:30 PM
Regarding the proposed 4- to 5-story building at 10th & Walker, I believe it will be directly behind Kaisers.

There is a small building there that is owned by Upward Transitions but they are relocating to W. Main St. in 2013, and I believe the intent is to sell their existing structure to St. Anthony:


Upward Transitions will relocate early in 2013 to their new home at 1134 W Main Street. During the next six months the old 1930's building will undergo a transformation from a deserted building used primarily for industrial purposes, to the new home for Upward Transitions. "We believe this move will have a positivie impact for clients we serve in the community. We will be centrally located for potential clients currently staying at the City Rescue Mission or those that have frequented the Day Shelter. Our Mission remains consistant...Elevating those who are in need, stranded or homeless to a position of self-sufficiency." Explains Upward Transitions Executive Director Dana Hope Chism. Upward Transitions will continue serving those in the community, as they have for nearly 90 years.

The Upward Transitions building is shown in yellow and the other properties owned by Saints are in pink:



http://www.okctalk.com/images/pete/stanthony.jpg

Nick
09-07-2012, 01:08 PM
Wow, St. Anthony's owns a significant amount of property. I didn't realize that.

CaptDave
09-07-2012, 04:59 PM
Wow, St. Anthony's owns a significant amount of property. I didn't realize that.

Nor did I. I always thought most of that land would be great single family, small lot, home sites.

Pete
09-07-2012, 05:10 PM
Saint Anthony employs almost 3,000 people, which is more than Devon.

And, they seem to be thriving and are always looking to expand. I don't post all the smaller building permits for improvements to their complex but there is a steady stream of them.


Remember too that they are partnering with Mode Homes to develop the long-awaited Lisbon Lofts on the land they own on the NW corner of 9th and Shartel. Hopefully, they'll do more of this.