View Full Version : BP CEO relieved of day to day duties



SoonerQueen
06-18-2010, 05:12 PM
BP: Tony Hayward to be relieved of day-to-day duties
LONDON (AP) — The chairman of BP says embattled chief executive Tony Hayward is being relieved of day-to-day responsibility for managing the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

fuzzytoad
06-18-2010, 05:37 PM
BP: Tony Hayward to be relieved of day-to-day duties
LONDON (AP) The chairman of BP says embattled chief executive Tony Hayward is being relieved of day-to-day responsibility for managing the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Isn't that sort of like saying Fred Flinstone has been relieved of the day-to-day responsibility for managing the Jetson household?

mugofbeer
06-18-2010, 10:45 PM
BP: Tony Hayward to be relieved of day-to-day duties
LONDON (AP) The chairman of BP says embattled chief executive Tony Hayward is being relieved of day-to-day responsibility for managing the Gulf of Mexico oil spill.

Ha! If I were Tony Hayward, I'd be pretty relieved now, too!

PennyQuilts
06-19-2010, 08:10 AM
Ha! If I were Tony Hayward, I'd be pretty relieved now, too!

I had the exact same thought.

Frankly, I absolutely believe him when he disclaimed knowledge of so many of things going on. They don't go to him with that crap. If they were cutting corners, who the hell would go that high up for permission? There are levels and levels of folks who get bonuses based on profit. He is not going to cut those kinds of corners to increase his bonus - doesn't need to.

BrettL
06-19-2010, 09:13 AM
I had the exact same thought.

Frankly, I absolutely believe him when he disclaimed knowledge of so many of things going on. They don't go to him with that crap. If they were cutting corners, who the hell would go that high up for permission? There are levels and levels of folks who get bonuses based on profit. He is not going to cut those kinds of corners to increase his bonus - doesn't need to.

Yeah I agree. Like Mugs said a week ago or so... prob some middle manager making dumb decisions. They kind of hung him out to dry on this one... granted his PR skills didn't help at all. But in the end he's still the captain of the ship.

bluedogok
06-19-2010, 06:32 PM
Yeah I agree. Like Mugs said a week ago or so... prob some middle manager making dumb decisions. They kind of hung him out to dry on this one... granted his PR skills didn't help at all. But in the end he's still the captain of the ship.
Most Brits have PR (and management) skills honed their home territory, which is completely different than how things are in the US. Things said there have different meanings and interpretations here. We found that out when Benham went from being an 800 person firm based in OKC to a 15,000 based in the UK. Trying to apply British management techniques and layers of management just didn't mesh well with the "cowboy mentality" that we had in Oklahoma. Luckily for all they sold the company back to a management group of leaders before the buyout (at a significant loss). Just completely different cultures, two countries separated by a common language.

When going after CEO's most people forget the corporate axiom...
The higher you go, the less they know...

ronronnie1
06-20-2010, 12:03 AM
In China this CEO would have been put to death.

One can only wish.

mugofbeer
06-20-2010, 10:35 PM
I had the exact same thought.

Frankly, I absolutely believe him when he disclaimed knowledge of so many of things going on. They don't go to him with that crap. If they were cutting corners, who the hell would go that high up for permission? There are levels and levels of folks who get bonuses based on profit. He is not going to cut those kinds of corners to increase his bonus - doesn't need to.

I sat there and watched some of the hearings and how they treated him - both parties. It was pathetic grandstanding. I think if I had been Hayward I would have blown a gasket and told all of them where to stick it. One the other hand, yes, he is the person where the buck stops but he didn't make the decisions that caused that well to blow out.