View Full Version : Forbes ranks Oklahoma #49 of Unhealthiest States.



okclee
11-17-2009, 02:46 PM
The Healthiest And Unhealthiest States - Forbes.com (http://www.forbes.com/2009/11/16/unhealthy-healthy-states-lifestyle-health-states-top_chart.html?partner=msnhealth)


Thank God for Mississippi.

State Ranking (http://www.americashealthrankings.org/yearcompare/2008/2009/OK.aspx)

OKCTalker
11-17-2009, 02:55 PM
Shouldn't we have a separate section for polls that rank Oklahoma in the top/bottom five of something?

bretthexum
11-17-2009, 04:33 PM
I saw this. Quite sad people can't take better care of themselves...

bbhill
11-17-2009, 04:42 PM
NSFW or people who are offended by language: :)

YouTube - Fat Guy Screams For Chicken at McDonalds (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vroGKeLnpyo)

adaniel
11-17-2009, 05:29 PM
NSFW or people who are offended by language: :)

YouTube - Fat Guy Screams For Chicken at McDonalds (http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vroGKeLnpyo)

WOW. Their chicken sandwiches aren't even that good. I pray that wasn't here.

Back on topic. This ranking doesn't surprise me. Fast food and sedentary lifestyles are common here, at least more so than the rest of the US. I'm actually surprised that we don't rank in the top 10 for smoking. When I first came to school here it blew me away how many people smoked or dipped. Of course this was 5 years ago so things could have changed.

Dustin
11-17-2009, 06:35 PM
Well we ate the fast food capital of the world.. So there really is nothing surprising about this..

Dustin
11-17-2009, 06:36 PM
Well we are the fast food capital of the world.. So there really is nothing surprising about this..

I love the irony of my typos. :D

progressiveboy
11-17-2009, 06:45 PM
Pitiful. What an embarrasment, maybe those sidewalks and senior activity centers for MAPS 3 are a excellent idea.

okcpulse
11-17-2009, 07:24 PM
Not to sound like an ass, but I wonder how much higher Oklahoma would rank if we gave southeastern Oklahoma to Arkansas. The quality of life in that part of the state is poor. But it is the prettiest part of the state. Oh well. If we can't get them out, we'll breed them out.

adaniel
11-17-2009, 08:12 PM
Not to sound like an ass, but I wonder how much higher Oklahoma would rank if we gave southeastern Oklahoma to Arkansas. The quality of life in that part of the state is poor. But it is the prettiest part of the state. Oh well. If we can't get them out, we'll breed them out.

LOL! I doubt that would make much of a difference in this case since they're are just as many fatties running around OKC and Tulsa as there are in Antlers and Broken Bow. In fact every poll I've seen both cities rank ridiculously high when it comes to fast food restaurants, heart disease, tobacco use, etc. etc.

I definitely agree about the quality of life in that part of the state. Absolutely stunning landscape backdropped against a disturbingly poor and uneducated populace. A very sad irony.

jbrown84
11-17-2009, 08:49 PM
Terrible. MAPS 3 will help, if we can get it passed over the cops' dead donut filled bodies.

soonerguru
11-17-2009, 09:22 PM
Not to sound like an ass, but I wonder how much higher Oklahoma would rank if we gave southeastern Oklahoma to Arkansas. The quality of life in that part of the state is poor. But it is the prettiest part of the state. Oh well. If we can't get them out, we'll breed them out.

Don't kid yourself. The problem is statewide. Having spent a lot of time down there, I'm not sure what you're saying is even true. A lot of folks work outside, and while their diets may not be great, a lot of them are not sedentary. There is a lot of poverty in that part of the state, but we have our share in the Metro area, and we have a ton of fast-food restaurants here; and the chain restaurants here aren't any better for people.

With a few exceptions, trying to dine out in OKC in a healthy manner is nigh impossible.

soonerguru
11-17-2009, 09:23 PM
Terrible. MAPS 3 will help, if we can get it passed over the cops' dead donut filled bodies.


LOL!
:LolLolLol

bretthexum
11-17-2009, 09:57 PM
Not to sound like an ass, but I wonder how much higher Oklahoma would rank if we gave southeastern Oklahoma to Arkansas. The quality of life in that part of the state is poor. But it is the prettiest part of the state. Oh well. If we can't get them out, we'll breed them out.

I thought meth made you skinny? lol

betts
11-17-2009, 11:30 PM
Again, one of the biggest problems in Oklahoma is the automobile. We drive to work. We drive to get fast food and eat it in our cars. We drive our kids to school (if they don't ride on the bus). We drive 2 blocks to the 7-11 to pick up a Coke and cheetos. We drive everywhere.

A paucity of sidewalks doesn't help. Suburban sprawl doesn't help. So, to beat a flagging horse, we need to increase walkability and we need more options for outdoor exercise. We've got great weather in comparison to many other states, and there's no reason why people can't be outdoors a lot of the time. Density plus sidewalks plus mass transit would help tremendously. If you walk to the bus or streetcar, walk to a nearby restaurant, walk through your neighborhood because you can, it all helps. We need to make sure our schools are serving healthy food to our children, we need to reduce television watching time and make sure our schools are encouraging physical activity and help parents do the same.

iron76hd
11-18-2009, 12:03 AM
Pitiful. What an embarrasment, maybe those sidewalks and senior activity centers for MAPS 3 are a excellent idea.
That's it! Build the sidewalks and walking trails and that will solve the obesity problem in the State of Oklahoma. Aren't some of you educated? Common Sense anyone?

Again, one of the biggest problems in Oklahoma is the automobile
Interesting...So get rid of the guns and deaths by guns will stop. Even the crime rate will drop, by your silly statement. Guns are the enemy!!!!
The problem is not cars Doctor!!! :bright_id It's complacency, apathy, or indolence. Whatever you call it. They car's not your enemy. There are plenty of GYMS. There are plenty of parks, trails, and lakes. No one want's to do the work!!!!!!

venture
11-18-2009, 12:24 AM
This city is too obsessed with polls. :-P

okyeah
11-18-2009, 12:24 AM
The major problem is that Oklahoma is underserved with not enough PCP (primary care physicians). That is why our ranking is so low...but the OU School of Community Medicine is trying to change this.

betts
11-18-2009, 12:26 AM
One of the problems in Oklahoma City is the distance between places people live and their destinations. Even if we had less sprawl, we have no sidewalks. Ever thought about walking from Quail Springs mall to one of the restaurants on the other side of Pennsylvania? I doubt it. Ever seen anyone do it? No sidewalks. Pedestrian unfriendly intersections. I suspect people get in their cars and drive if they're both shopping and dining across the street from each. In Manhattan or Chicago people would laugh at the concept of driving to go a block. The difficulty driving and parking are a blessing in disguise, as people actually have reason to walk places.

How, in Oklahoma, do you even get to a gym, a park, a trail, a lake? You drive there, of course. We have no bike lanes to speak of, we have very few sidewalks, and our trails aren't linked. Many people cannot afford a gym. We have a car culture that discourages exercise, and that is as much a problem as our diet. It doesn't take a lot of intelligence to figure that out, especially if you look at the healthy cities. Most of them have mass transit and transit alternatives to the car. Many of them have bike lanes. Many of them are denser cities that encourage walking. Is it conceivable there is a link?

Larry OKC
11-18-2009, 01:44 AM
A common thread of the many of the MAPS 3 "proposed" projects is they "will promote a healthier community."

bombermwc
11-18-2009, 07:34 AM
Just take a look around the next time you go out. Count the number of overweight folks. I bet you have a more difficult time finding healthy weight folks.

We're fat and lazy...it's a perpetual cycle.

Platemaker
11-18-2009, 12:19 PM
Terrible. MAPS 3 will help, if we can get it passed over the cops' dead donut filled bodies.

OUCH!
jbrown.... this is the best post that ever happened to me!

Platemaker
11-18-2009, 12:36 PM
That's it! Build the sidewalks and walking trails and that will solve the obesity problem in the State of Oklahoma. Aren't some of you educated? Common Sense anyone?

Interesting...So get rid of the guns and deaths by guns will stop. Even the crime rate will drop, by your silly statement. Guns are the enemy!!!!
The problem is not cars Doctor!!! :bright_id It's complacency, apathy, or indolence. Whatever you call it. They car's not your enemy. There are plenty of GYMS. There are plenty of parks, trails, and lakes. No one want's to do the work!!!!!!

Aren't YOU educated??

There is absolutely a correlation between a city's walkability and overall health. Compare any 'healthiest' list and 'walkable' list and it's obvious.

Gun's aren't the enemy... but the accessibility of guns will naturally contribute to more deaths by guns.

Cars are not the enemy.... but if easiest way from point A to point B is to drive you will naturally less walking.

Less walking (exercise in general) = more lard a****

Accessibility of parks, trails, and lakes would naturally contribute to more use.

This could go on all day.... is this the common sense to which you are referring?

Brian Walters much?

Grumpy old man syndrome maybe?

Pete
11-18-2009, 12:42 PM
Here's a particularly shocking stat from the detailed report:


Since 1990, the prevalence of obesity increased from 11.6 percent to 30.9 percent of the population

So, not only is 30% of the adult population in OK clinically OBESE (not just over-weight) that number has almost tripled in less than 20 years.

At this rate, it won't be long before half the state is obese.


Also, fully 25% of all adults in Oklahoma smoke. That's amazing... Some states have only a 10% smoking rate.

AND the state is 49th in terms of getting regular physical activity.


People need to get out of their cars (or at least drive past the ubiquitous fast food joints), stop smoking and get outside and be more active.

It's one of the main reason for the emphasis on parks, trails and public transportation in OKC's MAPS 3 proposal and a lot of Tulsa's initiatives as well.

Pete
11-18-2009, 12:54 PM
They car's not your enemy. There are plenty of GYMS. There are plenty of parks, trails, and lakes.

If you've ever lived anywhere else, you know this isn't close to true.

It's absolutely shocking just how few sidewalks there are in OKC, let alone bike lanes, running/biking paths, etc.

Yes, some trails have been built in the last couple of decades but as a city, we are still way behind. People love to poke fun about Cheeseheads in Wisconsin, for example, yet there are bike and running paths EVERYWHERE in Milwaukee, Madison and throughout the state. Name a city, and I could site many more examples.


When I think back on growing up in what was one of the nicer areas of NW OKC, I realize there were no sidewalks in any of the neighborhoods around me. No crosswalks at interections, very few parks and absolutely no bike lanes or paths. Even the stuff at Lake Hefner was just all mud and weeds.

But the good news is that people want to change that and there are lots of great plans on the drawing boards.


OKC is quite simply the worst city I've ever seen for people just being out of their cars and out and about. It's certainly not surprising given the almost inability to walk/ride anywhere -- even if you wanted to.

jbrown84
11-18-2009, 04:30 PM
That's it! Build the sidewalks and walking trails and that will solve the obesity problem in the State of Oklahoma. Aren't some of you educated? Common Sense anyone?

Common sense says the way to fight obesity and general unhealth in this state is to make exercise more a part of the culture. You aren't suggesting any other solutions, so you clearly have no mindset for progress.

CrimsonOberon
11-18-2009, 04:45 PM
You know what is our biggest problem?




















































We click on links to these lists instead of living in ignorance. Come on, guys - ignorance is bliss. If we didn't see it, then it's as good as if it never happened.:irule:

But seriously, I do think walkability would, if not fix the problem, certainly allow for more ways to combat it. There are very few reasons for anyone to get exercise these days unless they either love it (which, believe it or not health nuts, not everyone does), or are in school where it is mandatory.

More walkways and safer walking routes just might appeal to the people that don't like to exercise, but do enjoy a nice, casual, calming stroll (i.e. exercise.)

ronronnie1
11-18-2009, 06:56 PM
This report is not surprising at all. I'm sure the list takes into account the number of hospitals per capita, smoking rates, obesity rates, etc. One of my best friends is morbidly obese, and since hanging around me, he's lost over 80 pounds. Being slim and healthy are great, but let's not ridicule and belittle those who are not.

jbrown84
11-18-2009, 09:12 PM
I can hardly imagine that we are lacking in hospitals.

CCOKC
11-19-2009, 10:30 AM
I know whenever I have walked on a busy street for exercise I have had many people stop and ask if I needed a ride somewhere. There are many people out there that just can't believe someone could just be walking to get some exercise around here.

Bunty
11-19-2009, 10:39 AM
People are actually asking strangers walking in the street if they need a ride? If so, seems like a good way to look for trouble.

soonerguru
11-19-2009, 09:53 PM
Grumpy old man syndrome maybe?

Maybe it's the bitter redneck syndrome?

soonerguru
11-19-2009, 09:55 PM
This report is not surprising at all. I'm sure the list takes into account the number of hospitals per capita, smoking rates, obesity rates, etc. One of my best friends is morbidly obese, and since hanging around me, he's lost over 80 pounds. Being slim and healthy are great, but let's not ridicule and belittle those who are not.

Is he still morbidly obese?

ronronnie1
11-20-2009, 01:43 PM
Is he still morbidly obese?

I think he's borderline now. He'll never be as slim as I am, but he's under 300 pounds and so much healthier. Very proud of his efforts.

RealtorJoe
11-23-2009, 02:29 PM
I would love to see unhealthy food taxed. Talk to any personal trainer and they will tell you that 80% or more is diet. Exercise helps for sure, but we have to make it more appealing to eat healthy food or less appealing to eat unhealthy food. Take the tax we collect and subsidize healthy foods, build more community centers and walking trails.

Hawk405359
11-23-2009, 02:57 PM
Common sense says the way to fight obesity and general unhealth in this state is to make exercise more a part of the culture. You aren't suggesting any other solutions, so you clearly have no mindset for progress.

And the biggest part of that is changing the mindset of the citizens. People can be healthy in this state if they wanted, but most people just aren't concerned about it. No amount of sidewalks would change it, changing the mentality is what has to be done. Blaming outside sources is what gets people into problems to begin with.

jbrown84
11-23-2009, 07:16 PM
How do you suggest changing the mentality?

If you build sidewalks, people see them, they see others walking, they get the idea that's good and acceptable. Their mentality changes. No one is saying any of these projects are the be all and end all of changing our unhealthy culture, but they are all positive steps.

JuJuBeans
11-24-2009, 12:13 AM
I don't understand how people can let themselves get so ginormous, unless of course they have a medical condition. I weigh myself every day and make sure I'm within a certain weight, and also make sure I wear the same size. Growing up my family made a huge deal about not getting fat, but still.. why would anyone want to stay fat or even get to the point of 'fatness?'

Hawk405359
11-24-2009, 12:24 AM
How do you suggest changing the mentality?

If you build sidewalks, people see them, they see others walking, they get the idea that's good and acceptable. Their mentality changes. No one is saying any of these projects are the be all and end all of changing our unhealthy culture, but they are all positive steps.

Something statewide that's similar to the mayor's campaign would be a great start for the obesity portion. Remember, this is a statewide problem, not a citywide one. We can build all the sidewalks here, but that won't cover much of it. It's also "unhealthy" as opposed to "fat" so there is a bit more.

I think trying to shift the blame outside of the individual is a poor way to do so. I'm not saying that sidewalks or trails are a bad thing, I'm saying that I don't think it addresses the core of the problem, some of the unhealthy habits we sadly share with other nearby states. There are options available now, and providing more is a good thing, but the only way people will change is to change the culture, and a sidewalk isn't going to do that. You have to work on educating them and trying to show them exactly what they have to gain by physical activity. Getting them to start using what they have is the hardest part.

jbrown84
11-24-2009, 10:40 AM
Well we are talking about the city here. Mayor Cornett and the city council can't do things to impact the state, but they can work on those living in OKC. I think they are taking a lot of great steps.

purplemonkeythief
11-24-2009, 10:46 AM
One thing I've noticed since moving back here is that there are virtually no places to eat a healthy meal unless you're willing to pay $10-20 for lunch. I'm walking around DT right now looking for -anything- healthy for less than $5 and failing miserably. I'm more than likely going to have to go with the 99cent burger option.

jbrown84
11-24-2009, 10:53 AM
Healthy food is more expensive everywhere. Where would you get a healthy meal for less than $5 in other cities?

JuJuBeans
11-24-2009, 11:00 AM
I think people should learn to pack their lunch/snack instead of eating out all the time. It's cheaper and healthier.

purplemonkeythief
11-24-2009, 11:08 AM
Well, in St. Louis there were the lexington market fruit stands, Baladas, 9th street Deli, bento specials at Wasabi, Sundeckers, Jimmy John's. There was also grocery stores downtown if you wanted to grab your own stuff to make a meal.

This is seriously the first place I've ever been to where it costs so much more to eat healthy as opposed to cheap "fast food"

purplemonkeythief
11-24-2009, 11:12 AM
I think people should learn to pack their lunch/snack instead of eating out all the time. It's cheaper and healthier.

That's definately what I'll be doing in this city once I find a job!

Until then, I can't really lug around a sack lunch with me all day while doing interviews.

Well, I -could-, but it would be embarassing if it started getting smelly or something :ohno:

jbrown84
11-24-2009, 12:29 PM
purple, you should try the deli in Robinson Renaissance, City Bites, Crave Smoothies, and Ground Floor Cafe in Leadership Square, Markie's Deli by the memorial, and there is a Jimmy John's in the Flatiron District.

Hawk405359
11-24-2009, 02:00 PM
Well we are talking about the city here. Mayor Cornett and the city council can't do things to impact the state, but they can work on those living in OKC. I think they are taking a lot of great steps.

The state is what was ranked next to last. The state is what Iron said before you criticized him for it. The change needs to be statewide. That's why sidewalks in the city won't do much at all (if anything) to affect the ranking. Yes, the mayor can't do anythign about the state, but the discussion is and should be on the state and what can be done for it.

purplemonkeythief
11-24-2009, 03:52 PM
purple, you should try the deli in Robinson Renaissance, City Bites, Crave Smoothies, and Ground Floor Cafe in Leadership Square, Markie's Deli by the memorial, and there is a Jimmy John's in the Flatiron District.

Ah, thanks.. I wasn't aware of the Jimmy Johns. I'll try to make my way over there next week when I'm DT again.