View Full Version : Current US Volcano Activity



venture
05-08-2009, 08:48 PM
Current Live Cams of Active Volcanoes

Alert Level Orange

Mount Redoubt, AK
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/avo/webcam/redoubt.jpg

Other views:
Alaska Volcano Observatory Webcam - Redoubt - CI (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/Redoubt_-_CI.php)
Alaska Volcano Observatory Webcam - Redoubt - DFR (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/Redoubt_-_DFR.php)


Kilauea Volcano, HI
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/KIcam/images/M.jpg

Other views:
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/KIcam/
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/HMcam/
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/POcam/
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/TEcam/

Alert Level Yellow

Veniaminof Volcano, AK
*Webcam currently broke, but may come back any day.*
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/avo/webcam/veni.jpg

Mauna Loa Volcano, HI
http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/MLcam/images/S.jpg

Panoramic: http://hvo.wr.usgs.gov/cams/MLcam/

All other US volcanoes are at either Alert Level Green or Unassigned.

venture
05-08-2009, 08:53 PM
Here are the weekly updates posted today.

ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
Friday, May 8, 2009 3:17 PM AKDT (Friday, May 8, 2009 23:17 UTC)


REDOUBT VOLCANO (CAVW #1103-03-)
6029'7" N 15244'38" W, Summit Elevation 10197 ft (3108 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH

Growth of the lava dome continued this past week and is now roughly equivalent in size to the largest dome that was emplaced during the 1989-90 eruption. As the dome grows larger it is increasingly unstable with a growing likelihood of a complete or partial dome failure. Currently AVO considers renewed explosive activity and dome destruction as the most likely outcome of the current episode of dome growth. The return to explosive behavior may occur with little or no advanced warning and would produce a significant ash cloud and lahars and/or flooding in the Drift River valley. There is also a possibility that the current episode of dome growth will slowly diminish and no further explosive activity will occur. Based on our knowledge of past eruptions at Redoubt AVO considers this outcome to be less likely.

Seismicity has varied in its frequency, magnitude, and source characteristics over the past week, but remains consistent with continued dome growth. Numerous rock falls off the unstable north flank of the dome have been observed in seismic and web camera images this week, and have produced minor ash plumes that have reached heights of 12,000 ft above sea level (several thousand feet above the volcano). Vigorous venting of steam and other volcanic gases has been observed, and broad regions of sulfur dioxide gas have been detected by airborne gas measurement flights and in satellite images extending for hundreds of miles from the volcano. Thermal anomalies related to dome growth were observed in satellite data throughout the week.

AVO is monitoring the situation closely and the observatory is staffed 24/7. AVO will provide frequent updates of the volcano's status and the earliest possible warning of significant explosive activity and other hazardous phenomena.

VENIAMINOF VOLCANO (CAVW #1102-07-)
5611'52" N 15923'35" W, Summit Elevation 8225 ft (2507 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY

Seismic activity began to increase significantly above normal background levels on the morning of May 6 at Veniaminof Volcano. This increase caused AVO to raise the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcano Alert Level to ADVISORY on the afternoon of May 7. Seismicity continues at an elevated rate with numerous small magnitude earthquakes being registered across the entire seismic network. Visual observations from residents of Perryville over the past several days indicate no change in the typical steaming from the summit caldera cone that has been the site of activity over recent years. Satellite images show no evidence of increased heat flow or ash emissions.

Given the elevated seismicity, it is possible that low-level ash emissions could occur with little or no additional warning. Ash emissions from typical eruptions of Veniaminof are relatively minor, and usually do not rise much higher than 15,000 ft above sea level. These ash plumes can extend for tens of miles and could be hazardous to aircraft in the vicinity of the volcano. Ash fall is typically confined to the summit caldera and the upper flanks of the volcano.

OTHER ALASKA VOLCANOES

Seismic activity is monitored in real time at 31 volcanoes in Alaska. Satellite images of all Alaskan volcanoes are analyzed daily for evidence of ash plumes and elevated surface temperatures. Some volcanoes may currently display anomalous behavior but are not considered to be at a dangerous level of unrest. Akutan, Aniakchak, Augustine, Dutton, Fisher, Fourpeaked, Gareloi, Great Sitkin, Griggs, Iliamna, Isanotski, Kanaga, Katmai, Korovin, Mageik, Makushin, Martin, Novarupta, Okmok, Pavlof, Shishaldin, Snowy, Spurr, Tanaga, Trident, Ugashik-Peulik, Ukinrek Maars, Westdahl, and Wrangell volcanoes are in color code GREEN and volcano alert level Normal. All are at or near normal levels of background seismicity. AVO did not detect ash plumes or significant elevated surface temperatures in the vicinity of any volcano.

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HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY DAILY UPDATE
Friday, May 8, 2009 7:51 AM HST (Friday, May 8, 2009 17:51 UTC)


This report on the status of Kilauea volcanic activity, in addition to maps, photos, and webcam images (available using the menu bar above), was prepared by the USGS Hawaiian Volcano Observatory (HVO). Hawai`i Volcanoes National Park status can be found at Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park - Hawai'i Volcanoes National Park (U.S. National Park Service) (http://www.nps.gov/havo/) or 985-6000. Hawai`i County Viewing Area status can be found at 961-8093.

KILAUEA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-01-)
1925'16" N 15517'13" W, Summit Elevation 4091 ft (1247 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: ORANGE
Current Volcano Alert Level: WATCH

Activity Summary for past 24 hours: Glow from the Halema`uma`u vent continues to be bright. Lava from east rift zone vents continues to flow through tubes to the coast and is entering the ocean at two locations west of Kalapana; there is an active surface flow at the top of the pali. Sulfur dioxide emission rates from the Halema`uma`u and Pu`u `O`o vents probably remain elevated; we hope to get a new measurement today.

Past 24 hours at Kilauea summit: A molten lava pond is near the base of the cavity deep below the floor of Halema`uma`u Crater. Over the last few nights, glow from the summit vent was the brightest it's been all year (recorded by both webcams pointed at it - see our new "Webcams" link at hvo.wr.usgs.gov). Tephra, mostly ash-sized, continued to be produced in small amounts and again consisted mostly of fresh glassy spatter including Pele's hair. Gas-rushing and individual-rocks-falling sounds were moderately loud during the morning tephra collection routine.

Northeasterly winds picked up strength yesterday evening; this morning, the gas plume, tinged brown in shadow, is rising high over the Halema`uma`u Crater rim and moving to the southwest through beautiful clear skies. Sulfur dioxide emission rates probably remain elevated and variable; the most recent rate measurement was 700 tonnes/day on April 15, compared to the 2003-2007 average rate of 140 tonnes/day; if current wind and sky conditions persist, we may be able to get an emission rate measurement today.

Summit tremor levels have been variable with abrupt transitions and no regularity giving recordings the appearance of banded tremor. Two earthquakes were located beneath the summit caldera and two earthquakes were located on south flank faults. The number of RB2S2BL earthquakes were still within background levels.

The network of tiltmeters at Kilauea's summit recorded no significant tilting; two of the tiltmeters suggest weak inflation. The GPS network (less sensitive than the tiltmeter network) has recorded about 1 cm of contraction across the caldera over the past 3 months.

Past 24 hours at the middle east rift zone vents and flow field: Magma continues to degas through Pu`u `O`o Crater before erupting from vents to the east. Sulfur dioxide emission rate measurements have been stymied by poor wind conditions; the most recent measurement was 1,900 tonnes/day measured on April 14, compared to the 2003-2007 average of about 1,700 tonnes/day. No incandescence was recorded within the crater or from the TEB vents overnight.

The tiltmeter on the north flank of Pu`u `O`o recorded diurnal variations. GPS receivers on opposite sides of the crater have documented about 1.5 cm of contraction over the past month and more than 5 cm over the past 3 months. Seismic tremor levels near the eruptive vents are low and steady.

Lava from the TEB vent and the rootless shield complex flows through tubes to the ocean at Waikupanaha and Kupapa`u. HVO geologists, on an overflight yesterday, mapped a new `a`a breakout from the TEB tube starting about 170 m (560 ft) above the abandoned Royal Gardens subdivision and stalling about 850 m (2,800 ft) farther down slope along the east side of the flow field; when seen yesterday, the `a`a had stalled and was being covered by pahoehoe from the breakout point. Both entries were robust; the Waikupanaha delta had built out about as far as it ever has in its 13+ month history suggesting that this bench is primed for collapse. Bus-sized chunks of delta were scattered on the beach fronting the Kupapa`u entry as a result of the collapse recorded by seismic signals Wednesday afternoon.

HAZARD ALERT: The lava delta and adjacent areas both inland and out to sea are some of the most hazardous areas on the flow field. Frequent delta/bench collapses give little warning, can produce hot rock falls inland and in the adjacent ocean, and can produce large but local waves. The steam plume produced by lava entering the ocean contains fine lava fragments and an assortment of acid droplets that can be harmful to your health. The rapidly changing conditions near the ocean entry have been responsible for many injuries and a few deaths.

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HAWAIIAN VOLCANO OBSERVATORY BIWEEKLY UPDATE
Monday, April 27, 2009 5:50 PM HST (Tuesday, April 28, 2009 03:50 UTC)


Report prepared by the Hawaiian Volcano Observatory:

MAUNA LOA VOLCANO (CAVW #1302-02=)
1928'30" N 15536'29" W, Summit Elevation 13681 ft (4170 m)
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY

Mauna Loa is not erupting. Slow extension, as measured by GPS receivers on opposite sides of the volcano, continued. Line lengths have been increasing at a slightly faster rate since September, 2008, due mostly to slippage on basalt faults beneath Mauna Loa's east flank and not to an increase in magma supply to the volcano. Recent instrumental problems with a summit GPS receiver have produced more-than-usual data scatter - this problem will be corrected when weather permits.

Tiltmeters have recorded no significant changes other than abrupt offsets that are related to instrumental issues or significant earthquakes. Diurnal tilt, or the tilting due to daily heating and cooling of the ground, was diminished by snowfall starting Christmas Eve, 2008.

Sensors within a crack in Moku`aweoweo crater floor continued to record background gas concentrations; fumarole temperatures also remained steady except for a few several-hour-long periods of temperature decrease due to snowfall.

Since the beginning of January, 2005, HVO analysts have rarely located more than 10 earthquakes per week beneath Mauna Loa summit. Each week, 1-5 earthquakes are also located beneath the Kealakekua area of west Mauna Loa. These levels are typical of the past several years. The Kao`iki seismic zone between Mauna Loa and Kilauea volcano summits remained active with an average of about 10-40 earthquakes per week; these numbers may reflect increased seismic activity nearer Kilauea summit rather than increased Ka`oiki activity.

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LONG VALLEY OBSERVATORY CURRENT STATUS REPORT
Friday, May 8, 2009 09:25 PDT (Friday, May 8, 2009 16:25 UTC)


LONG VALLEY VOLCANIC CENTER VOLCANO (CAVW#1203-14-)
37.70N 118.87W, Summit Elevation 11122 ft (3390 m)
Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Aviation Color Code: GREEN

The realtime detection system located three small earthquakes in the Long Valley caldera area since the last update at 9:17 AM on May 7. All were located in the Sierra Nevada south of the caldera, and all had magnitudes less than M=1.0.
Elsewhere, M=1.7 and 1.8 earthquakes at 3:46 and 4:26 PM on the 7th were located beneath the Inyo Mountains 8 miles east of Big Pine. Also, M=1.8 and 1.7 earthquakes at 5:07 AM and 5:21 AM on the 8th were located 5 miles SE of Bishop.

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The Long Valley Observatory (LVO) monitors and studies earthquakes, ground deformation, degassing, and other types of geologic unrest in and around the Long Valley Caldera. The 15 by 30 km Long Valley Caldera was formed during an eruption 760,000 years ago and is located 20 km south of Mono Lake along the east side of the Sierra Nevada in east-central California. There have been multiple smaller eruptions since the caldera-forming eruption with the most recent occurring 250 years ago in Mono Lake at the north end of Mono-Inyo Craters volcanic chain. LVO is one of the five USGS Volcano Observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety.

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CASCADES VOLCANO OBSERVATORY WEEKLY UPDATE
Friday, May 1, 2009 15:18 PDT (Friday, May 1, 2009 22:18 UTC)


Cascade Range Volcanoes
Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Aviation Color Code: GREEN

Activity Update: All volcanoes in the Cascade Range are at normal levels of background seismicity. These include Mount Baker, Glacier Peak, Mount Rainier, Mount St. Helens, and Mount Adams in Washington State; Mount Hood, Mount Jefferson, Three Sisters, Newberry Volcano, and Crater Lake, in Oregon; and Medicine Lake volcano, Mount Shasta, and Lassen Peak in northern California.
Mount St. Helens has been at Volcano Alert Level NORMAL (Aviation Color Code GREEN) since July 10, 2008.

Recent Observations: Seismicity remains at background levels at Cascades volcanoes. Maintenance crews were inactive this week owing to poor weather.

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YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO OBSERVATORY MONTHLY UPDATE
Friday, May 1, 2009 11:17 MDT (Friday, May 1, 2009 17:17 UTC)


YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO (CAVW#1205-01-)
44.43N 110.67W, Summit Elevation 9203 ft (2805 m)
Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Aviation Color Code: GREEN

April 2009 Yellowstone Seismicity Summary

During the month of April 2009, 242 earthquakes were located in the Yellowstone region. The largest event was a magnitude 2.7 on April 28 at 7:14 PM MDT, located about 6 miles north northeast of Old Faithful, YNP. A second M 2.7 was part of a swarm detailed below. There were three earthquake swarms during the month of April. The first, located 4 miles northwest of West Yellowstone, included 62 events spanning April 13-18 with magnitudes ranging from 1.3 to -0.6. The second, located 7 miles northwest of West Yellowstone, included 111 events from April 17-24 with magnitudes 2.3 to -0.8. The third swarm, located 11 miles northeast of Old Faithful, included 19 events all occurring on April 29th with magnitudes ranging from 2.7 to 0.5.

Earthquake activity in the Yellowstone region is at relatively normal background levels.

An article on the recent earthquake swarm during December 2008 and January 2009 can be found at:
Yellowstone Lake Earthquake Swarm Summary as of 8 January 2009 (http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/publications/2009/09swarm.php)
Scientists continue to look at data collected during the swarm and will publish their results over the coming months and years. However, if any findings have direct implications for public safety, they will be released to the public immediately.

Ground Deformation Summary: Through April 2009, continuous GPS data show that much of the Yellowstone caldera continued moving upward, though at a lower rate than the past several years. The WLWY station, located in the northeastern part of the caldera has undergone ~23 cm of uplift since mid-2004. The general uplift of the Yellowstone caldera is of scientific importance and will continue to be monitored closely by YVO staff.

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venture
05-12-2009, 06:57 PM
This was caught on the Hut cam at Redoubt last night. Shows just how hot the rocks are in the lava dome.
http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/avo/dbimages/display/1242154086_ak231.jpg

Luke
05-13-2009, 02:38 PM
Oooooh, Mordor!

Sorry, Just watched Lord of the Rings: The Return of the King last night.

venture
06-25-2009, 05:44 PM
Bumping this. A small eruption occurred today at the Cleveland Volcano. AVO has raised alert level to ORANGE for right now.

http://www2.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/cleveland.jpg

A small eruption at Cleveland volcano occurred today and AVO is raising the Aviation Color Code to Orange and the Alert Level to Watch. An ash plume from the volcano was seen in satellite images from 1915 UTC (11:15 AKDT) today. The plume has detached from the volcano is moving south. Estimated plume height is less than 15,000 ft. above sea level.

Luke
06-25-2009, 05:48 PM
Ohio has volcanoes?

;)

OKCisOK4me
06-26-2009, 11:24 AM
Ohio has volcanoes?

;)

They do now. It's called Mt. Shaq

venture
06-30-2009, 02:47 PM
Both Cleveland and Redoubt are now Code Yellow.

AVO is lowering the Aviation Color Code to Yellow and the Alert Level to Advisory at Redoubt volcano. Seismic, satellite, gas, and deformation observations over the past few weeks indicate that growth of the lava dome at Redoubt has significantly slowed, if not stopped, and therefore it is possible that the current eruptive activity has ended. However, it is unknown if this represents the end of the 2009 eruption of Redoubt or if the activity has only paused temporarily and might resume in the next months.

The large lava dome located at the north side of the summit crater, and extending down the Drift Glacier Gorge, still presents a hazard. It is possible that this large mass of fresh lava is unstable and could fail with little or no warning, leading to significant ash production and possible lahars in the Drift River valley.

AVO will continue to monitor Redoubt's activity closely, but begin to transition off 24/7 staffing. Later updates will describe operational changes as they occur.

westsidesooner
07-01-2009, 10:38 AM
Nice view of Redoubt this morning with a lenticular cloud over the summit.

http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/redoubt-3.jpg?0.013071868895316751

venture
07-10-2009, 09:58 PM
Alaska Volcano Observatory - Shishaldin - Eruption Page (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Shishaldin.php)

2009-07-10 14:14:25 - VAN/VONA
The Alaska Volcano Observatory is rasing the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Alert Level to ADVISORY at Shishaldin Volcano based on the presence of a persistent thermal anomaly in the summit crater.

Beginning in January 2009, a distinct thermal feature in the summit crater has been observed intermittently in satellite imagery. Over the past month, the intensity of this thermal feature has increased. AVO has observed this thermal anomaly several times over the past week while satellite viewing conditions were favorable. The increase in thermal emissions at Shishaldin mark a change from the normal background observed since the end of the previous eruption in 1999. Seismicity at the volcano has not changed appreciably over the time interval during which the thermal anomaly has been observed. Tiltmeters operated by UNAVCO with the National Science Foundation's Earthscope Project on the north and west flanks of the volcano show no deformation of the volcano during this time period. Satellite observations show no significant sulfur dioxide gas emissions.

AVO has received a few reports of steaming from the summit crater, which has also been observed in satellite imagery. However, this is not necessarily anomalous activity for this volcano, and the unrest observed over the past several weeks does not indicate that an eruption is imminent. AVO will continue to watch Shishaldin carefully for additional signs of increased unrest.

venture
10-04-2009, 01:43 AM
Just a quick update. Redoubt was finally lowered to GREEN status this past week, so things are quieting down there for now. However, Cleveland was raised to orange today for an eruption similar to the one back in June.

http://www2.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Cleveland.php
Satellite data indicate that Cleveland volcano erupted briefly this morning at ~0730 UTC (2330 AKDT) 02 October 2009, producing a small, detached ash cloud that drifted northeast of the volcano at maximum altitudes of 15,000' to 20,000' (4.5 - 6.1 km) . AVO increased the aviation color code to Orange, and the volcano alert level to Watch at 02:29 AKDT (10:29 UTC) this morning. Satellite views until about 6:45 AKDT (14:45 UTC) show that the ash cloud drifted northeast about 600 km (373 mi) and dispersed over the Bering Sea. While no more events have been detected this morning, further eruptive activity is possible.

The lack of a real-time seismic network at Cleveland means that AVO is unable to track local earthquake activity related to volcanic unrest. Short-lived explosions with ash plumes that could exceed 20,000 ft above sea level can occur without warning and may go undetected on satellite imagery.

http://www2.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/cleveland.jpg

venture
12-29-2009, 01:20 AM
Looks like she may be waking up again...


ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY CURRENT STATUS REPORT
Monday, December 28, 2009 12:37 PM (Monday, December 28, 2009 21:37 UTC)


REDOUBT VOLCANO (CAVW #1103-03-)
6029'7" N 15244'38" W, Summit Elevation 10197 ft (3108 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

Earlier this morning, AVO elevated the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcano Alert Level to ADVISORY at Redoubt Volcano. Beginning about 4:00 pm AKDT on December 27 (0100 December 28 UTC), small repetitive earthquakes began to occur in the vicinity of the volcano's summit. Activity is continuing this morning; these earthquakes are very small and have decreased in frequency overnight. These earthquakes represent a departure from seismicity at the volcano over the past five months. (See AVO Webicorders - Redoubt (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webicorders/Redoubt/RSO_EHZ_AV.php)). Clouds currently obscure web camera and satellite views of the volcano.

These earthquakes could be precursory to renewed eruptive activity at the volcano and increased instability of the lava dome. Whether this will result in explosive activity or collapse of the lava dome is unknown at this time. However, there is a heightened possibility of volcanic activity that would produce a volcanic ash cloud and associated ash fall, pyroclastic avalanches, and lahars and flooding down the Drift River.

AVO is monitoring the situation closely and will attempt to overfly the volcano when weather allows.

venture
01-24-2010, 02:56 AM
Missed this one.

YELLOWSTONE VOLCANO OBSERVATORY INFORMATION STATEMENT
Thursday, January 21, 2010 2:26 PM MST (Thursday, January 21, 2010 2126 UTC)


Yellowstone Volcano
4425'48" N 11040'12" W, Summit Elevation 9203 ft (2805 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: NORMAL
Current Aviation Color Code: GREEN

The earthquake swarm on the northwest edge of Yellowstone Caldera that began on January 17, 2010 continues.


PRESS RELEASE FROM YVO PARTNER UNIVERSITY OF UTAH SEISMOGRAPH STATIONS


Released: January 21, 2010 2:00PM MST


This release is a continuation of information updates building upon our two previous press releases on the ongoing earthquake swarm on the west side of Yellowstone National Park. The University of Utah Seismograph Stations reports that a pair of earthquakes of magnitude 3.7 and 3.8 occurred in the evening of January 20, 2010 in Yellowstone National Park.


The first event of magnitude 3.7 occurred at 11:01 PM and was shortly followed by a magnitude 3.8 event at 11:16 PM. Both shocks were located around 9 miles to the southeast of West Yellowstone, MT and about 10 miles to the northwest of Old Faithful, WY. Both events were felt throughout the park and in surrounding communities in Wyoming, Montana, and Idaho.


These two earthquakes are part of an ongoing swarm in Yellowstone National Park that began January 17, 2010 (1:00 PM MST). The largest earthquake in the swarm as of 12 PM, January 21, 2010, was a magnitude 3.8. There have been 901 located earthquakes in the swarm of magnitude 0.5 to 3.8. This includes 8 events of magnitude larger than 3, with 68 events of magnitude 2 to 3, and 825 events of magnitude less than 2. There have been multiple personal reports of ground shaking from observations inside the Park and in surrounding areas for some of the larger events (for felt reports, please visit Did You Feel It? (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/)). Earthquake swarms are relatively common in Yellowstone.


The swarm earthquakes are likely the result of slip on pre-existing faults rather than underground movement of magma. Currently there is no indication of premonitory volcanic or hydrothermal activity, but ongoing observations and analyses will continue to evaluate these different sources.


Seismic information on the earthquake can be viewed at the University of Utah Seismograph Stations: UUSS University of Utah Seismograph Stations (http://www.seis.utah.edu/).


Seismograph recordings from stations of the Yellowstone seismograph network can be viewed online at: The University of Utah (http://quake.utah.edu/helicorder/yell_webi.htm).


Anyone who has felt earthquakes in the swarm are encouraged to fill out a form on the USGS Community Felt reports web site: Did You Feel It? (http://earthquake.usgs.gov/eqcenter/dyfi/).


This press release was prepared by the Yellowstone Volcano Observatory partners of the U.S. Geological Survey, the University of Utah, and the National Park Service: http://volcanoes.usgs.gov/yvo/
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The Yellowstone Volcano Observatory (YVO) is a partnership of the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS), Yellowstone National Park, and University of Utah to strengthen the long-term monitoring of volcanic and earthquake unrest in the Yellowstone National Park region. Yellowstone is the site of the largest and most diverse collection of natural thermal features in the world and the first National Park. YVO is one of the five USGS Volcano Observatories that monitor volcanoes within the United States for science and public safety.

Thunder
01-24-2010, 03:00 AM
Hmmmm... They're having it. We're having it. Haiti. Something big is coming!

venture
01-24-2010, 03:13 AM
The swarms at Yellowstone are pretty common. The Caldera has been uplifting for the last several years, so there is likely some shifting going on underground. I would really only get worried if the earthquake frequency increased as well as some strong earthquakes. The crust holding the magma chamber together is extremely strong and it'll take a lot of jolting or more pressure build up to make it fail. Recent studies indicated the magma chamber of Yellowstone to be twice as large as previously thought...but how close it is to failing isn't know.

For those unfamiliar with the Yellowstone Caldera...Wikipedia has a pretty accurate write up: Yellowstone Caldera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowstone_Caldera)

silvergrove
01-26-2010, 02:14 PM
The swarms at Yellowstone are pretty common. The Caldera has been uplifting for the last several years, so there is likely some shifting going on underground. I would really only get worried if the earthquake frequency increased as well as some strong earthquakes. The crust holding the magma chamber together is extremely strong and it'll take a lot of jolting or more pressure build up to make it fail. Recent studies indicated the magma chamber of Yellowstone to be twice as large as previously thought...but how close it is to failing isn't know.

For those unfamiliar with the Yellowstone Caldera...Wikipedia has a pretty accurate write up: Yellowstone Caldera - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yellowstone_Caldera)

When I was a little kid, I was always fascinated with the Yellowstone caldera. Then again, I was fascinated with meteorology, paleontology, and astronomy. Now I'm getting a PhD in biology, hah!

But if Yellowstone is to blow up within my lifetime...yeesh. I would suppose no one would be safe on the North American continent in the immediate aftermath. But being anywhere in the world wouldn't guarantee survival either...

westsidesooner
01-27-2010, 10:45 AM
Yellowstone is fascinating. And someplace everyone should visit once if not more in their lifetime. We went there about 5 years ago and it was awesome. Truly an American treasure. So much beauty, yet all the while so much potential destruction. It's kinda weird to be standing in an active (semi) volcano.....so much science value for kids too. Not to mention all the wildlife. I'm glad I saw it when I did, some day it's going to blow and it won;t be pretty for anyone on the earth. Hopefully it won't happen during our lifetime.

I also saw Nola..pre Katrina. Now I have to get to Key West and Miami before a major hurricane destroys them.

Thunder
01-27-2010, 11:07 AM
BREAKING NEWS! Yellowstone just blew!

westsidesooner
04-06-2010, 10:25 AM
Looks like Redoubt might be wakeing up from its nap.

REDOUBT VOLCANO (CAVW #1103-03-)
6029'7" N 15244'38" W, Summit Elevation 10197 ft (3108 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

AVO raised the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcano Alert Level to ADVISORY at Redoubt volcano this morning. A series of small repetitive earthquakes began at 01:44 AKDT (0944 UTC) this today in the vicinity of the volcano's summit. Activity is continuing this afternoon. See AVO Webicorders - Redoubt (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webicorders/Redoubt/RSO_EHZ_AV.php)

These earthquakes may be precursory to renewed eruptive activity at the volcano and increased instability of the lava dome. Whether this will result in explosive activity or failure of the lava dome is unknown at this time. However, there is a heightened possibility of volcanic activity that would produce a volcanic ash cloud, pyroclastic avalanches, and lahars and flooding down the Drift River.

venture
04-23-2010, 07:32 PM
Nothing going on with Augustine (Alaska), but they do have a newer webcam on the volcano now and its pretty clear and crisp. Little steam coming out of the crater today - which is normal.

http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/augtst.jpg

http://www.avo.alaska.edu/webcam/aug_lagoon.jpg

mheaton76
04-23-2010, 08:20 PM
Upon viewing these pictures, it reminds of one of the articles I read in relation to the effect of retreating ice pack and how it may have possibly played a role in the recent eruption in Iceland. See here:

Ice cap thaw may awaken Icelandic volcanoes - Yahoo! News (http://news.yahoo.com/s/nm/20100416/wl_nm/us_iceland_volcano_climate)

If true, I wonder if Redoubt, Augustine, etc possibly might also be influenced by glacial retreat? I give it some consideration, because from what I understand the earth's crust is affected by surface ice. Finland, for example, is still rising each year a bit more above sea level, from the retreat of its glaciers at the end of the last ice age. Food for thought, anyway.

venture
04-23-2010, 11:33 PM
It's always going to play a role. Eruptions can happen a couple ways. The main one is just pressure from build up in the magma chamber. Another one is sort of related in that a newer lava dome that was formed can collapse back into the magma chamber causing it to erupt again (primary concern with Redoubt for the next couple of years). The other would be where earthquakes can play a role - such as with Mt. Saint Helens. That volcano was already unstable from pressure build up and as soon as it experience a large earthquake the entire side destabilized and the chamber found a way to release pressure.

I wouldn't doubt that there are cases where melt water can cause lava domes/rocks to become more unstable. Whether you blame that on whatever man or natural causes, it'll eventually happen regardless.

venture
05-25-2010, 10:30 PM
Cleveland - Eruption Page : Alaska Volcano Observatory (http://www.avo.alaska.edu/activity/Cleveland.php)

Volcano: Cleveland (CAVW #1101-24-)

Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Previous Volcano Alert Level: UNASSIGNED

Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW
Previous Aviation Color Code: UNASSIGNED

Issued: Tuesday, May 25, 2010, 4:17 PM AKDT (20100526/0017Z)
Source: Alaska Volcano Observatory
Notice Number: 2010/A4
Location: N 52 deg 49 min W 169 deg 56 min
Elevation: 5676 ft (1730 m)
Area: Aleutians Alaska

Volcanic Activity Summary: Thermal anomalies observed in satellite data over the past few days suggest that Cleveland Volcano has entered another period of volcanic unrest. In the past, the presence of thermal anomalies at the summit has been followed by moderate ash bursts, sometimes to aircraft flight levels. Therefore, AVO is raising the Aviation Color Code to YELLOW and the Volcano Alert Level to ADVISORY.

The lack of a real-time seismic network at Cleveland means that AVO is unable to track local earthquake activity related to volcanic unrest. Unrest at Cleveland is frequent, and short-lived explosions with ash clouds or plumes that could exceed 20,000 ft above sea level can occur without warning and may go undetected on satellite imagery.

venture
06-01-2010, 11:27 AM
ALASKA VOLCANO OBSERVATORY CURRENT STATUS REPORT
Monday, May 31, 2010 12:33 PM (Monday, May 31, 2010 20:33 UTC)


CLEVELAND VOLCANO (CAVW #1101-24-)
5249'20" N 16956'42" W, Summit Elevation 5676 ft (1730 m)
Current Volcano Alert Level: ADVISORY
Current Aviation Color Code: YELLOW

A small ash emission occurred early last night from Cleveland. The cloud was visible in a 7:56 pm ADT May 30 (0356 UTC, May 31) satellite image moving to the southwest and it did not rise above 16,000' ASL. At the time of the satellite image, the cloud was detached, and it is estimated that the emission occurred several hours earlier. The event was a short-lived ash emission and there are no signs of further activity.

The lack of a real-time seismic network at Cleveland means that AVO is unable to track local earthquake activity related to volcanic unrest. Unrest at Cleveland is frequent, and short-lived explosions with ash clouds or plumes that could exceed 20,000 ft above sea level can occur without warning and may go undetected on satellite imagery.

OKCisOK4me
06-01-2010, 01:16 PM
Well then, I sure hope King James is leaving Ohio then :poke: