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Thread: City Jail

  1. #1

    Arts District / Film Row City Jail

    The City is set to put out an RFP to redevelop the old City Jail, which has sat vacant for some time.

    The new Municipal Courts building will open this summer and thus the old courts and police station immediately east of the jail will be demolished, more or less completely the civic redevelopment work in the immediate area.

    The property is just south of another city-owned parcel that is also soon to go out for RFP, vacant land at 4th and Shartel.

    Proposals are due September 26th.










    http://newsok.com/development-propos...rticle/5552331

    I. THE SOLICITATION
    The City of Oklahoma City, hereinafter referred to as the City, is soliciting proposals for
    redevelopment, by purchase or lease, of the Old City Jail Facility at 200 N. Shartel
    Avenue in Oklahoma City. The City has completed construction of a new Police
    Headquarters and is currently constructing a new Municipal Court facility. The Old Jail is
    located adjacent to the existing Police/Courts facility, which will be demolished. The City
    invites consideration by interested parties for reuse of the Old Jail in a manner
    complementary to these other construction projects, and to the broader redevelopment of
    the surrounding downtown area.
    II. BACKGROUND
    The Old Jail is located on North Shartel Avenue, one block north of West Main Street
    and one block west of the Civic Center. The facility was completed in 1940 and was used
    by the Oklahoma City Police Department until the late 1980s when the new County Jail
    was constructed. All City prisoners are now housed in the county facility. The Old Jail is
    currently vacant.
    The structure is six stories tall and includes a partial basement. The sixth floor was added
    in 1960 at the same time the original art deco embellishments on the west entry were
    removed. The building has two elevators, one of which is non-operational. Elevator floor
    plates are 6’ X 6’ with ceiling heights of 7’6”. Each floor is 6,885 square feet for a total
    building size of 41,310 square feet. Ceiling beams on the 1st and 2nd floors have at least
    8’ clearance, while floors 3-6 have clearance of 6’10”.
    Redevelopment of the building may include single or multiple uses. The redeveloper
    must ensure that significant historic characteristics of the building are maintained.
    Proposals must demonstrate how they will support and leverage ongoing and planned
    downtown development. The proposed project must be financially viable and should not
    be contingent upon funding from The City of Oklahoma City.
    III. HISTORIC SIGNIFICANCE
    Hare and Hare, consultants from Kansas City, completed Oklahoma City’s first
    comprehensive plan in 1930. The plan included a “Civic Center” which was later
    constructed based largely on the Hare Plan and included the Jail, Auditorium, City Hall
    and Courthouse.
    City and County bonds approved in 1935, together with a federal matching grant,
    supported construction of all four buildings conceived in the Civic Center plan.
    The Municipal Auditorium, City Hall, and Courthouse, are each individually listed on the
    National Register of Historic Places, and the Jail has been identified previously as
    potentially eligible for listing on the National Register. Listing would potentially qualify
    City of Oklahoma City and Bid RFP-OCITY-040
    its Trusts 6/6/2017 8:20 AM p. 12
    Page 2 of 9
    the rehabilitation of the property for state and federal tax credits for certified
    rehabilitation.
    IV. SITE CONTEXT
    Several recent redevelopment actions within a five minute walk have primed this area for
    new investment. Significant public investments have been completed in the surrounding
    area, including Project 180 and Film Row streetscapes, renovations of the lawns between
    the Civic Center and City Hall and renovation of the nearby Myriad Gardens. The new
    John Rex Elementary School at West Sheridan Avenue and North Walker Avenue has
    been completed, as has the new Police Headquarters building. A new Courts
    Administration building should be completed this year. The construction of Oklahoma
    City’s new streetcar line is currently underway, and will include alignments in close
    proximity to the Jail.
    Numerous private developments throughout the surrounding area include the
    rehabilitation of historic buildings for commercial, office, and residential use. The new
    21C Hotel in the revitalized Fred Jones Manufacturing Building on Main Street adds new
    hotel rooms to the downtown market and has served as a development driver to
    downtown’s west end. A large-scale mixed used development is planned in the adjacent
    area that proposes 345 multifamily housing units, as well as new shops, restaurants, and
    amenities. New construction of residential and commercial facilities, including structured
    parking, span from West Sheridan Avenue north into the Midtown area of Oklahoma
    City.
    V. CURRENT BUILDING CONDITION
    • Mechanical services and utilities to the buildings were provided through the old
    Police Headquarters building, which will be demolished. Therefore, services and
    utilities to the Old Jail will need to be provided in a future renovation.
    • The building is not compliant with the Americans with Disabilities Act.
    • No fire alarm or sprinkler system exists except on the ground floor.
    • Due to roof leaks and broken or leaking windows, the building has been exposed to
    the elements, including birds and other wildlife, and to water infiltration and related
    damage.
    • Asbestos is present on HVAC hardware and has been confirmed in the floor tile and
    mastic.
    • Sixth floor exterior walls are deteriorating. The walls are constructed of concrete
    blocks with no steel reinforcement. Over the years, water has penetrated the walls
    causing failure. Pieces of the exterior stucco on the sixth floor are beginning to fall
    off.
    City of Oklahoma City and Bid RFP-OCITY-040
    its Trusts 6/6/2017 8:20 AM p. 13
    Page 3 of 9
    • Lead based paint has not been tested, but is likely throughout the building. See
    Appendix A for the “Asbestos and Lead-Based Paint Survey” report of July 14, 1995.
    VI. PRE-SUBMITTAL BUILDING TOURS
    Potential proposers will be offered an opportunity to attend a non-mandatory building
    tour, to be scheduled prior to the submittal date. Potential proposers who plan to attend
    are asked to contact Lacy Kelly at (405) 297-2245 or lacy.kelly@okc.gov by June 20,
    2017 in order to confirm availability and scheduling, and to receive additional
    information about tour content and safety procedures.
    VII. PRELIMINARY IDEAS FOR REUSE
    Current zoning for the Old Jail is DBD (Downtown Business District), which allows a
    wide range of commercial, residential and other uses. This zoning includes requirements
    for design review via the City’s Downtown Design Review Committee, with regulations
    and design guidelines that encourage mixed use, pedestrian-friendly development of an
    urban character, and the retention of structures that are historic or that contribute to the
    design, form, and urban character of the district.
    This zoning is supported by Oklahoma City’s comprehensive plan, planokc, adopted in
    2015. planokc establishes Land Use Typology Areas (LUTAs), and locates the Old Jail
    within the Downtown LUTA. Key characteristics include urban, high intensity
    development with close proximity among business, residential, “destination”, and
    amenity-related uses.
    In 2015, the City of Oklahoma City also established the Downtown Development
    Framework to define a vision for the downtown’s ongoing development and future
    growth. This Framework lays out development typologies, street typologies, and other
    considerations for sub-districts within Downtown Oklahoma City. The Old Jail is located
    within an area of downtown called the Civic/Arts Sub-District, for which the Framework
    includes characteristics and development priorities of medium density, mixed use
    development, a mix of new construction and historic structures, and potential uses
    including multifamily housing, hotels, office buildings, and education/healthcare
    facilities.
    Previous planning efforts have identified an opportunity for connection between new or
    rehabilitated facilities serving various Civic/Arts Sub-District needs, from housing to
    shared workspace to creative retail. Redevelopment of the Old Jail offers a range of
    options for adaptive reuse that would be supported by existing and ongoing developments
    in the surrounding area, recent planning initiatives and identified goals for Downtown
    Oklahoma City.

  2. #2

    Default Re: City Jail

    This is great news! What is the most likely proposal? Apartments?

  3. #3

    Default Re: City Jail

    Quote Originally Posted by OkiePoke View Post
    This is great news! What is the most likely proposal? Apartments?
    I hope something can be done with this but am not super hopeful.

    They tried this in 2012, nothing came of it. Times have changed, but the floors in that building are very low with is a big limitation, and there are other issues as well.

    Maybe the time is right now. Hope so.

  4. #4

    Default Re: City Jail

    Looks like they only received one response to the RFP and they have deemed it not to meet requirments.

    City Council will vote today to reissue the RFP; this will be the 3rd attempt.

    *************************

    The City is seeking proposals to redevelop the Old Jail facility.
    Redevelopment of the building may include single or multiple uses. The
    redeveloper must ensure that significant historic characteristics of the
    building are maintained. Proposals must demonstrate how they will
    support and leverage ongoing and planned downtown development. The
    proposed project must be financially viable and should not be contingent
    upon funding from The City of Oklahoma City.

    Background On June 20, 2017 a Request for Proposals (RFP) to redevelop the Old
    City Jail was advertised in the Journal Record and posted in the electronic
    bidding system for proposals to be received on September 26, 2017.
    Eighty-nine potential proposers viewed the RFP, and one proposal was
    received by Gator Industrial, LLC. The proposal submitted was
    nonresponsive to the requirements of the RFP.

    Staff is recommending the proposal received be rejected and that the RFP
    be readvertised for two weeks.

  5. Default Re: City Jail

    What was the proposal that was rejected?

  6. #6

    Default Re: City Jail

    Quote Originally Posted by Jeepnokc View Post
    What was the proposal that was rejected?
    It was not included in the agenda packet for the meeting today.

  7. #7

    Default Re: City Jail

    OKC seeks development proposals to bail out old city jail

    By: Brian Brus The Journal Record November 6, 2017

    OKLAHOMA CITY – City Hall is going to ask developers for better ideas for the old city jail property this week.

    The first round of pitches was less than satisfying, Planning Department Director Aubrey McDermid said.

    “The only offer we received was to demolition the building,” McDermid said. “Nothing after that. Just demolition.

    “That won’t do at all,” she said.

    The six-story building at 200 N. Shartel Ave. originally served as the police department headquarters in addition to a detention facility when it opened in 1940. Administration offices moved out in the 1960s, and the city jail closed in the 1990s.

    The building has remained empty since then. City Hall built a new headquarters last year to the south. Police officers now book people into the Oklahoma County detention center about a block to the west.

    Even if someone can envision a use for the building’s shell or floor configuration – the top floor is shorter than comfortable for the average person, McDermid said, and probably only good for storage – rehabilitation will be a challenge for environmental reasons: The original builders put a lot of asbestos and lead paint into the building.

    “Remediation will be costly,” she said.

    City staff on Tuesday will request council members decline the proposal by Gator Industrial to raze the site without putting something in its place. Proposals must demonstrate how they will support and leverage ongoing and planned downtown development.

    McDermid said City Hall hopes for a plan that would include historic restoration, which might open the deal for tax credits or other government-related funding options. However, she stressed that the city does not currently have money to help. A business improvement district fundraising plan would have to be proposed by the developer.

    McDermid said a new round of requests for proposals is expected to attract a group of developers related to Marva Ellard, a developer who came forward about five years ago when City Hall first tested the market. Ellard’s proposal at the time highlighted the potential for multi-use: a diner restaurant, convenience store or laundry, with a second phase dependent on the first.

    According to the RFP document, each of the building’s floors has 6,800 square feet for a total of about 41,000.

    The first round of proposals was advertised in The Journal Record and posted in the electronic bidding system for proposals to be received on Sept. 26.

    That invitation attracted 89 potential proposers who viewed the RFP document, but only Gator responded.

  8. #8

    Default Re: City Jail

    I was in Tampa recently and their former downtown post office, which later became the courthouse (similar to ours), was then sold after they built a new courthouse. It was converted into a hotel a few years ago and the entire basement, which used to be the jail/holding cells, was converted to rooms and amenities. I went on a tour and if they hadn't told me it had been a jail I would not have been able to tell. This building can be made beautiful and useful again.

  9. #9

    Default Re: City Jail

    With the city not currently having money to help (no TIF funds for this but everything else?) and the fact that you have asbestos in there and its an older structure, the city might have to just give it away due to the fact it will take a bunch of money to renovate. Otherwise, the numbers might not make any sense for any developers if they have to pay a significant amount of money for the property.

    Either way, the city should do what they can to keep the building and find someone who will bring it back to life.

  10. #10

    Default Re: City Jail

    TIF would be available for this project, as it's in TIF 2 which has collected way, way more than ever budgeted.

  11. #11

    Default Re: City Jail

    Just saw this quote and assumed there was no TIF money for this:

    McDermid said City Hall hopes for a plan that would include historic restoration, which might open the deal for tax credits or other government-related funding options. However, she stressed that the city does not currently have money to help. A business improvement district fundraising plan would have to be proposed by the developer.

  12. #12

    Default Re: City Jail

    Not sure what that means.

    It could be through all these loans to developers that they have obligated all existing funds.

  13. #13

    Default Re: City Jail

    Renovation proposed for historic City Jail

    Local developer Marva Ellard has proposed renovating the long vacant old City Jail in west downtown.



    The City Council voted today to name her and her group as the conditional redeveloper of the property after Ellard's response to the city's RFP was determined to be in closest alignment with the established criteria.

    Ellard and architect Catherine Montgomery of the Preservation and Design Studio both spoke to the council before they authorized a resolution allowing the city to move forward with Ellard's group to move towards more specifics in terms of exact plans, financing and a financial projections.

    Ellard told council that although plans are still evolving, possible uses would be a conveniences / sundry store on the first floor which would service workers and visitors to the area. Other possible tenants would be a diner and fitness center as well as office space and record storage.



    Renovation of the building has been problematic due to its condition and low ceiling height.

    Economic Development Program Manager Brent Bryant said that if all goes to plan, details could be before the council in June for their approval with construction starting in the 4th quarter of 2018.

    The old jail sits directly west of soon to be demolished old courthouse and police headquarters which have been replaced with new buildings to the north and south.



    Ellard redeveloped the historic Seiber Hotel in Midtown into apartments and is now part of a group looking to re-purpose the old Villa Teresa school with townhomes, a hotel and other uses.


  14. #14

    Default Re: City Jail

    make the upper floors into an urban Public Storage.
    Oklahoma City, the RENAISSANCE CITY!

  15. #15

  16. #16

    Default Re: City Jail

    Sounds like there really isnt much of a plan.

    Also, the city did a poor job on the RFP. Little notice, no viewing period, very little info to go off of. Hope something can be done with it though.

  17. #17

    Default Re: City Jail

    Quote Originally Posted by onthestrip View Post
    Also, the city did a poor job on the RFP. Little notice, no viewing period, very little info to go off of. Hope something can be done with it though.
    This was all very strange.

    In the City Council materials a 'review committee' was mentioned whereby they made this selection after posing some questions to the responding group. The council did not receive a copy of the response or even a summary of what was being proposed; just a memo asking them to provide approval to proceed then a quick presentation by Ellard and Montgomery at their last meeting.

    Apart from the council meeting, I don't think any of this was public and not sure why it wasn't.

  18. #18

    Default Re: City Jail

    Normally I abhor non-transparency. But this is a supremely important (to not destroy) building (IMO the civic center buildings are a set that we should not separate), and also the last RFP ended up with MW Wrecking submitting an RFP to demo it. OY. Definitely don't need more of that.

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