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  1. #76
    PLANSIT's Avatar
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    I tend to agree.

  2. #77
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by CuatrodeMayo View Post
    . . . I actually kinda like "Cottage District" because it is quite the misnomer. It makes the neighborhood sound very quaint, but in reality it is considerably the opposite, like Greenwich Village in NYC. . .
    I still like "Cottage District" myself CuatrodeMayo . . . imo, SOSA has no romance to it. However, I did receive an email enquiry about one of our Midtown appartments the other day that included a SOSA reference, so it may already be creeping into broader use.

    South of Tenth Street might form a more appropriate acronym.

    Pray For World Peace . . . pass it on.

    Michael Smith
    The Old Downtown Guy

    It will take decades for Oklahoma City's
    downtown core to regain its lost gritty,
    dynamic urban character, but it's exciting
    to observe and participate in the transformation.

  3. #78
    okclee is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    For what it is worth I like "Cottage District" too.

  4. #79
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Dear God.... I really am gonna shoot myself over this cottage district SoSa nonsense....

  5. #80
    progressiveboy is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by Platemaker View Post
    Dear God.... I really am gonna shoot myself over this cottage district SoSa nonsense....
    lol......Really we are talking about a silly name not the end of the world.

  6. #81
    metro is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Update on Steve's blog:

    Redefining/Defining a Neighborhood

  7. #82
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    If that was typical of the artwork presented, I can understand why there might be some apprehension on the part of some people reviewing the project. For this type of presentation sometimes the "artist" type renderings can make something look more "abstract" than it actually is. The abstract works well when you are trying to get a sense of scale/form but may not have the materials selected but more photo-realistic rendering might have helped.

  8. #83
    mturner is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by metro View Post
    Update on Steve's blog:

    Redefining/Defining a Neighborhood
    I just checked out the article. Whew, if the speed at which people have been posting over there is any indication, I am sorry to have missed the BOA session. Any updates this week?

  9. #84
    OUJAG is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Between SOSA and Cottage District, my pick is Cottage District as well.

  10. #85
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by metro View Post
    Update on Steve's blog:

    Redefining/Defining a Neighborhood
    Thanks for posting the link Metro. Lots of pointed comments over there. I posted a piece if anyone is interested.

    Michael

    Pray For World Peace . . . pass it on
    The Old Downtown Guy

    It will take decades for Oklahoma City's
    downtown core to regain its lost gritty,
    dynamic urban character, but it's exciting
    to observe and participate in the transformation.

  11. #86
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    In New York SOHO, is "SOuth of HOuston" street, only the street is pronounced HOW-Stun. South of Tenth Street as a district would be shortened to SOTS (which if the plan is to have a lot of bars... maybe). I always like it when city planners locate the drinking district near an emergency room, shows forward thinking.

    Cor-Ten roofs would work there also.

  12. #87
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Silliman View Post
    In New York SOHO, is "SOuth of HOuston" street, only the street is pronounced HOW-Stun. South of Tenth Street as a district would be shortened to SOTS (which if the plan is to have a lot of bars... maybe). I always like it when city planners locate the drinking district near an emergency room, shows forward thinking.

    Cor-Ten roofs would work there also.
    Hey Stan . . . . always with the jokes . . . . thanks for the elocution lesson, and the blatant commercialism. Good to see you posting here.

    Michael Smith

    Pray For World Peace . . . pass it on
    The Old Downtown Guy

    It will take decades for Oklahoma City's
    downtown core to regain its lost gritty,
    dynamic urban character, but it's exciting
    to observe and participate in the transformation.

  13. #88
    Stan Silliman's Avatar
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by The Old Downtown Guy View Post
    Hey Stan . . . . always with the jokes . . . . thanks for the elocution lesson, and the blatant commercialism. Good to see you posting here.

    Michael Smith

    Pray For World Peace . . . pass it on
    Hey, Michael, good to hear from you.

    So what is it SOTS or SOSA?
    If it's SOSA, I've got another joke. I have a million of them ,did I tell ya?
    Anyway, if we call it SOSA, there's a chance this guy might visit:

    Silliman on Sports - a new sports and humor column

  14. #89
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by Stan Silliman View Post
    South of Tenth Street as a district would be shortened to SOTS (which if the plan is to have a lot of bars... maybe).
    Thank god that area is already called Metro Park otherwise I'm sure people here would want to call it that.

    If they had their way every block or two would be a different "district."

  15. #90
    metro is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    NW 7 and Shartel is still a changing battle zone
    Oklahoman
    BY STEVE LACKMEYER
    Published: January 27, 2009Buzz up!

    In my earliest years at The Oklahoman, I covered crime. I was consistently baffled by the stupidity of the bad guys — and perhaps no more so than by the way that drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes openly did business along NW 7 and Shartel, a block north of the police headquarters.

    That was 18 years ago, and the stretch is still a war zone. The drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes are gone. The combatants now are neighborhood activists and prominent architects fighting over the area’s name, development and future.

    On one side you have architect Randy Floyd, who along with Michael Smith were urban pioneers who risked much to renovate and move into a stretch of territorial homes along NW 7. The pair are veterans of the city’s preservation movement, and their efforts on NW 7 were applauded as an example of how to bring life back to the inner-city.

    More renovations followed along NW 7, as did other architects. But some came with different ideas. Architects Bryan Fitzsimmons and Dennis Wells built new homes on the block — modern-style structures that are more in keeping with the Classen Glenn condominiums built at NW 7 and Classen in the early 1980s.


    Preservation activist not the ‘little old lady’
    As I visited with Floyd about the progress under way a couple years ago, she was uncomfortable but holding back criticism of the modern architecture hitting her street. She also insisted that she’s not the "little old lady” who only likes old buildings, and she hinted she was eyeing a more modern design for a new home to be built on a nearby empty lot.

    Yet that’s how she’s being portrayed by Wells and his supporters as they fight back against Floyd’s effort to overturn a ruling by the Urban Design Committee that supported plans for a new home designed by Fitzsimmons for William Lovallo, a professor at the University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center.

    The issue might seem obscure to some — whether the planned Lovallo home setback is too close to the street. With one member of the Board of Adjustment abstaining and two others absent, the two remaining members last week deadlocked on whether to uphold Floyd’s effort to overturn the design committee’s approval of the narrow setback.

    Building differing visions in the area
    All of the sides seem intent on making the area a great downtown/MidTown neighborhood. But their visions are clearly different, even if not sharply defined.
    Floyd argues she is not trying to dictate the neighborhood’s future, though she notes it is one of the city’s oldest, having been platted more than 100 years ago. She wants some basic guidelines, including setbacks, and disagrees with the contention that she is seeking strict design controls similar to those in place in neighborhoods such as Heritage Hills.

    Wells agrees there should be setbacks as well, though he’s unable to say where the setback should be. Wells has established a Web site — Free SoSA — that advocates turning the neighborhood into a laboratory for modern and experimental design. And he’s even arguing the area’s name, "the Cottage District,” should be changed to "SoSA,” (South of Saint Anthony).

    As I listen to both sides argue their case, I’m reminded of just how lost the neighborhood was two decades ago.


    SoSA, Cottage District — it’s home
    A community has arisen in place of the drug dealers, pimps and prostitutes, and although these new residents might not be enjoying any block parties any time soon, it appears the future of NW 7 is an exciting one. Regardless of any setback.

  16. #91
    mcgrawsdad is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Just my humble opinion, but I wonder if 50 years from now, what will society think of urban design such as mr. fitzsimmons? Will they think that urban concrete design was ahead of the curve, or will they ask ...WTF were they thinking?

  17. #92
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    "urban concrete design" Where did that come from? I don't see anyone pushing "urban concrete design". Mr. Fitzsimmons' design is modern, urban in that it tries to maximize the land it is on. The concrete is the proposed material of this one structure. I don't see that concrete was a big part of his own home, another modern, urban design. Also don't see a lot of concrete in the garage that he helped design for his former neighbor, Phil Bewley. I'm sure future residents will be just as opinionated as we are, but I doubt he'll be judge for the materials of 1 structure.

  18. #93
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by mturner View Post
    I just checked out the article. Whew, if the speed at which people have been posting over there is any indication, I am sorry to have missed the BOA session. Any updates this week?
    Resolution of BOA 3/5/09 hearing: 5-0 vote denied Randy Floyd's appeal of UDC's unanimous decision. Project allowed to go forth after 4 months of delay.

  19. #94
    metro is offline VIP Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    FYI...the Lovallo residence broke ground yesterday.


  20. #95
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    They didn't waste any time after that final decision on the appeal.
    Don't Edmond My Downtown

  21. #96
    mturner is offline Participating Member
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Should they have? A moment of reflection and contemplation? I heard they've been delayed 4 months already.

  22. #97
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    No they certainly shouldn't have. That wasn't a criticism. The smilies aren't working lately.
    Don't Edmond My Downtown

  23. #98
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Quote Originally Posted by metro View Post
    Why is it funny? Also SOSA is not even close to the same as Crown Heights on so many levels. SOSA is filled more with modern thinkers, engineers and architects and the downtown crowd. Crown Heights is a more trendy crowd (Western Ave. crowd) and more traditional architecture.
    Wow, that's a whole lotta unfair generalizations jammed into one post. Who knew that "SOSA" (the name could use some work...) contained the lion's share of modern thinkers, engineers, architects and "downtown crowd" than Crown/Edgemere...

  24. #99
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    Sustainable urban design thrives in Cottage District
    Fitzsimmons Architects set to break ground on new, modern home


    (OKLAHOMA CITY) April 2 – A significant milestone affirming one man's dream, an architect’s vision and a neighborhood's continued rebirth is set for 10 a.m. April 6, as Fitzsimmons Architects prepares to break ground on the Cottage District's newest residential project, located at 825 NW 7.

    A vacant lot in the burgeoning downtown neighborhood holds the future residence of Bill Lovallo. The Cottage District's newest infill project, dubbed "Oklahoma Case Study House," is nothing less than the fruition of Lovallo's life-long dream of building a home inspired by the classic mid-century architectural style of the California and Connecticut Case Study Homes, which stand as hallmarks of efficient, affordable, modern design.
    Architect Brian Fitzsimmons, hired to design and build Lovallo's dream house, said the residence is a return to the roots of classic modernism. "The stars sort of aligned for this project in a way that felt good from the start," said Fitzsimmons. "From the beginning, the design evolved in such a way that only this home, on this site, at this time, could be built for this man."

    Construction of the Oklahoma Case Study House will begin immediately following groundbreaking and is slated for completion in spring/summer 2010.

    Fitzsimmons said Monday's groundbreaking celebration is about more than one man's dream. "Bill was determined to make his home in the Cottage District," said Fitzsimmons. "His commitment reaffirmed the momentum of the neighborhood and my belief that this area holds great potential to be a community in the truest sense of the word. This is a big part of the reason for my own relocation to the area.”

    More than 40 neighbors and downtown community advocates are expected to attend the event.

    Fitzsimmons Architects, located in Oklahoma City's Paseo area, designs residential and commercial architecture to be expressive of three unique characteristics: client, location and function. The firm manages all facets of the design process – from concept to completion – and believes that sustainability and green building design are fundamental considerations to that process. www.fitzsimmons-arch.com.



  25. #100
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    Default Re: South of St Anthony

    The Journal Record - Article

    Work begins on Cottage District home
    by Kelley Chambers
    The Journal Record April 7, 2009

    OKLAHOMA CITY – Work began Monday on what Bill Lovallo called his crazy idea.


    Bill Lovallo and architect Brian Fitzsimmons at the groundbreaking ceremony of Lovallo’s home in the Cottage District. (Photo by Maike Sabolich)

    Lovallo proudly stood on a pile of dirt at the top of a hill with a view of the downtown skyline, on what will be 825 NW Seventh St., and thanked about 30 friends and supporters for coming to the site of his future home.But the road was long for Lovallo to go from having no idea that homes were being built in the area dubbed the Cottage District, to a protest by two neighbors on the setback plans for his house, to final approval last month by the Board of Adjustment.

    The whole thing began three years ago when Lovallo was having a discussion with a friend over a cup of coffee at the Red Cup on Classen Boulevard.

    Gary Hargrave, owner of coffee roaster Prima Café, told Lovallo about new and renovated homes on NW Seventh Street, and the two drove down to have a look.
    In the midst of shacks and vacant lots were two homes renovated by architect Randy Floyd and her husband, Michael Smith, and an ultra-modern home built by Brian Fitzsimmons and his wife, TiTi Nguyen.

    “It planted an idea in my mind that it would actually be possible to build a house in a neighborhood like this, this close to downtown,” Lovallo said. “From that day that idea really never left my mind.”

    Lovallo has lived in a 1925 home in Jefferson Park for decades, but had the idea for a modern urban home in the back of his mind. When he began telling friends about the idea, not everyone thought it was such a good plan. At times Lovallo even questioned the decision to build in an area rife with urban decay.

    “There are times I thought, ‘Am I crazy enough to do this?’” he said with a laugh. “And yes, I guess I am.”

    A quick look around the neighborhood at the Fitzsimmons and Nguyen home, called Okasian, made Fitzsimmons the obvious choice to design Lovallo’s home.
    Fitzsimmons set to work on a design that immediately pleased Lovallo. It drew influence from California and Connecticut case study homes with a nod to modern home designs from the 1950s and 1960s.

    All was well until the final design included a cantilevered second level. Jutting out, it drew ire from neighbors Floyd and Smith. The matter came before the Urban Planning Commission late last year.

    Floyd contended that while the house was in line with the fronts of others homes on the street, the cantilevered portion would extend eight feet beyond the acceptable setback.
    After several rounds of debate the commission approved the plan but Floyd appealed and had it brought before the Board of Adjustment. In March the board denied Floyd’s appeal.

    Lovallo said he appreciated the support he received from others in the neighborhood, like Art and Beth Rutledge, even at the beginning of the permitting process.

    “I thought ‘this is really, really nice that I’m not even building yet and I’ve got neighbors who are willing to come out and sit there and support what we’re doing here in this neighborhood,’” Lovallo said.

    Beth Rutledge, who moved into a renovated 1925 Cottage District home, said she respected Floyd’s passion for historic preservation and her commitment to the neighborhood, even if they did not see eye-to-eye on plans for the Lovallo house.
    “As an investor in this neighborhood I couldn’t be happier to see Bill’s vision, this house, and the Cottage District’s momentum taking flight,” she said.

    On Monday Floyd and Smith were traveling abroad and unavailable for comment.
    Fitzsimmons echoed the admiration for Floyd and Smith, who renovated two hundred-year-old buildings and added two garage apartments to their property.

    “Randy and Michael were the true pioneers here,” Fitzsimmons said.
    Work began Monday on Lovallo’s 1,730-square-foot home and is set for completion in May 2010.

    “It’s a relief to finally be at this point,” Fitzsimmons said. “I’m so glad Bill stuck through the process because not many clients would be willing to go this extra mile to build a house.”

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